Academic & Student Affairs Handbook

Procedural guide for implementing BoR policies related to Academic Affairs

Appendices D - H

(Last Modified March 28, 2019)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.0, STUDENT AFFAIRS

↑ Top

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

Students are encouraged to submit their social security numbers as part of their admission applications, however, it is the student’s right to refuse. Institutions should include in the student handbook their policy regarding use of the student social security number and established procedures for handling confidential information.

↑ Top

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

SOURCE:
BoR POLICY 4.1.5, STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

The USG is committed to providing equal educational opportunities to all students. USG institutions offer students with disabilities a variety of services and accommodations to ensure that both facilities and programs are accessible. The information provided on working with students with disabilities is an overview of the resources available and the policies and procedures in place that are intended to facilitate accessibility and academic success.

All institutions of the USG shall adopt the common criteria for documenting disabilities and employ a common methodology for providing services to students with diagnosed disabilities.

The criteria for documenting disabilities can be found in Appendix D. Specific documentation guidelines for nine disability categories are described in Appendix E.

↑ Top

3.3.1 Regents’ Centers for Learning Disorders

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

Last reviewed: February 2019

Learning Disorders include Learning Disabilities, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Acquired Brain Injury, and Psychological Disorders as described in Appendix E. The Board of Regents of the USG has established the following three centers for the provision of assessment, resources, and research related to students who have learning disorders that impact academic, cognitive and/or behavioral/emotional functioning.

  • Regents’ Center for Learning Disorders at Georgia Southern University
  • Regents’ Center for Learning Disorders at Georgia State University
  • Regents’ Center for Learning Disorders at The University of Georgia

Each Regents’ Center for Learning Disorders (RCLD) is responsible for serving designated colleges and universities (referring institutions) within a geographic region. The host institution serves as fiscal agent for each RCLD. See Appendix F for a list of RCLDs and their assigned institutions.

Purpose of the RCLDs

The RCLDs provide the following services:

  • Comprehensive standardized assessments for students with learning disorders
  • Review of documentation submitted by referring institutions in support of student requests for accommodations
  • Recommendations regarding appropriate accommodations and services
  • Assistance to students, faculty and staff at referring institutions through consultation, networking, and program development
  • Clinical training opportunities in graduate level psychology, education, and related programs
  • Research focusing on assessment and accommodation of students with disabilities in postsecondary settings

In addition to their primary mission of serving students enrolled in USG institutions, the Centers may be authorized to serve other groups of students. Current information on the availability of services for non-USG students can be obtained by contacting each RCLD directly.

Organizational Structure

The RCLDs consist of professionals who are specialists in the assessment of adults and in evaluation of disabilities that impair learning. Each RCLD has, at the minimum, the following personnel:

  • Director. The director is responsible for overseeing the daily operation of the RCLD and for carrying out USG policy regarding student disabilities. The Academic Vice President of the host institution is the supervisor of record.

  • Psychologist. The licensed psychologist oversees the evaluation process, including training, interviewing, scheduling, testing, staffing, and report writing. The psychologist ensures that the professional and ethical standards of the American Psychological Association are followed.

  • Liaison. The liaison promotes and maintains contact between the referring institutions and each RCLD, assists in the referral and feedback process for RCLD evaluations and RCLD review of documentation of disability, assists referring institutions in the development of policies and procedures to serve students with disabilities on their campuses, and provides community outreach and education to support the mission of the RCLD.

  • Other qualified personnel are involved directly in interviewing, testing, and writing reports for students who are evaluated in the RCLDs.

USG Accommodations for Students With Learning Disorders

In order to ensure consistency throughout the USG, all RCLDs use the same general evaluation procedures, test battery and report format. This common evaluation methodology ensures that all USG institutions employ the same definition and evaluation model.

Evaluations performed by external professionals or organizations will be reviewed using the same methodology as if the evaluation was conducted by an RCLD.

Some accommodations for USG requirements must be approved by an RCLD. Students with learning disorders who are requesting the accommodations outlined below, are required to submit documentation to an RCLD for approval:

Each USG institution is responsible for providing approved accommodations or modifications, including assistive technologies. The RCLDs and the AMAC Accessibility Solutions & Research Center are available to assist institutions with arranging for these accommodations.

Outside Evaluations

Referring institutions must have institutional policies and procedures for reviewing documentation of disabilities that is not based on an evaluation conducted by an RCLD. Institutional policies and procedures must be consistent with BoR policy.

Referring institutions are required to submit documentation of learning disorders to meet USG requirements to an RCLD when a student requests accommodations. Referring institutions may also elect to send outside documentation for review to the appropriate RCLD under other circumstances.

Referral for Evaluations

Referring institutions are required to submit a referral packet containing the following items to the appropriate RCLD to initiate the evaluation process:

  • Information letter and checklist completed by the Disability Service Provider (DSP)
  • Questionnaire on academic strengths and weaknesses, historical information, and behaviors that can affect learning (completed by the student)
  • Questionnaire on student’s functioning ability (completed by a person who knows the student well and can provide an independent view)
  • Academic transcripts from current and/or previous institutions
  • Recent vision and hearing sensory screenings
  • Samples of written work
  • Copies of previous medical or psychological evaluations related to learning difficulties

The DSP at the referring institution is responsible for coordinating the completion of the referral packet and communicating with the RCLD regarding the student’s referral, evaluation, and accommodations. See Appendix G for the referral process flowchart. For more information regarding disability documentation, see Appendices D and E.

Evaluation Considerations

  1. Professional Standards and Confidentiality

    • American Psychological Association ethical standards are upheld.
    • Information gathered before, during, and after an evaluation will be kept strictly confidential.
    • Information will not be released to any person or institution without written permission of the student.
    • The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) provide additional guidelines on right of access and disclosure of protected information.
  2. Liability Issues

    • Neither the referring institutions nor the RCLDs are liable for students while they are traveling to and from the RCLDs for the evaluation.
    • A contact person at the referring institution must be designated for emergency purposes while the student is on the RCLD campus.
    • RCLDs require liability insurance coverage for all RCLD personnel involved in the evaluation process. This liability coverage is necessary to meet the standards of professional practice as outlined in State Licensing Law.
  3. Cost of Evaluations

    • Students are assessed a $500 fee for each evaluation (subject to annual review).
    • Payment schedules may vary across RCLDs.
    • Evaluation scholarships may be available at individual RCLDs and/or referring institutions.
    • Students may contact their local Georgia Department of Labor, Rehabilitation Services to determine if they qualify for services, which may include funding to offset evaluation costs.
  4. Appeals Procedure

    Students wishing to dispute a decision of an RCLD with regard to eligibility for accommodations may appeal by submitting a request for independent review of their documentation by the directors of the other two RCLDs.

    The request must meet the following conditions:

    • Specify the issue(s) of disagreement in writing
    • Be submitted to the DSP at the student’s home institution
    • Be initiated within 30 days of receiving the disputed decision

    A student wishing to appeal the decision of the independent review may appeal to the President of the home institution. The President’s decision is final. The Board of Regents does not hear appeals for eligibility for accommodation.


↑ Top

3.3.2 AMAC Accessibility Solutions & Research Center

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

The AMAC Accessibility Solutions & Research Center, an initiative of the USG, is committed to removing barriers and providing access to knowledge for individuals with physical, sensory, and learning print-related disabilities. AMAC serves individuals with print-related disabilities in a variety of ways.

AMAC works with all USG institutions serving postsecondary students as well as high school students transitioning to postsecondary institutions. AMAC offers a variety of services to meet the individual needs of students with print-related disabilities and the institutions serving them, including access to the following:

  • Alternative media production
  • Electronic files (e-files) requested from publishers
  • High quality scanned image files
  • E-text formatting services
  • NEON, AMAC’s online repository of available alternative media that tracks students, orders, and media production
  • Assistive technology software and hardware
  • Other national repositories, services and products (e.g., Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic)
  • Password protected electronic material delivery service
  • Monthly student services reports
  • Training and technical assistance
  • Braille text conversion or contract services. AMAC specializes in math, science, foreign language Braille transcription services.

AMAC services and costs vary depending on membership status. AMAC services help institutions to:

  • Protect themselves against copyright infringement laws

  • Comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act standards and provide students with print-related disabilities equal and timely access to materials

  • Increase the knowledge of institutional information technology departments, faculty, and staff on accessible digital media and accessible information technology through the incorporation of universal design for learning environments

AMAC is not a replacement for disability services, but a resource that offers expertise in alternative media production and assistive technology software and hardware. The AMAC team works closely with disability service providers and students to ensure that they receive high quality and timely services.


↑ Top

3.3.3 Admissions Considerations

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

Applicants with disabilities are expected to have completed the Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) with the appropriate instructional accommodations. No exemptions or substitution are permitted for these required courses with the exception of the foreign language requirement.

Students who are unable to complete the RHSC foreign language requirement successfully due to a documented disability may petition for a substitution for the foreign language requirement (see Appendix H, Admissions Consideration Flowchart) using the following guidelines:

Foreign Language Requirement

Two years of a single foreign language or two years of American Sign Language is required for admission to USG colleges and universities. To receive permission for a substitution, students should do the following:

  • Notify the Office of Admission at the time of application that they are petitioning for a RHSC foreign language substitution
  • Contact the DSP at the institution for assistance in completing the petition.
  • Submit their petition documentation with the admission application

If the petition is approved, the student will be allowed to satisfy the RHSC foreign language requirement by substituting another type of course. The approval of a petition for substitution does not waive the requirement.

Approval of a petition for a course substitution for the RHSC foreign language requirement does not extend to the foreign language requirements of certain degree programs at the University level. Students must submit a separate petition, following their institution’s standard procedures for modifications to program requirements, to request a course substitution for foreign language coursework required for a specific program of study or degree.

Other Considerations

Students with disabilities will not be penalized for taking standardized admissions tests (e.g. ACT, SAT, GRE, LSAT, MCAT) with accommodations. Students seeking disability accommodation should contact the testing agencies (College Board and ACT).

To be considered for admission, students are expected to achieve the institution’s admission requirements, including minimum SAT or ACT scores with the testing accommodations.


↑ Top

3.3.4 Regents’ Test Administration

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

Last reviewed: February 2019

This section has been removed as the Regents’ Test is no longer administered in the USG.


↑ Top

3.3.5 Learning Support Considerations

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

Last reviewed: February 2019

Students with documented disabilities who are required to enroll in Learning Support must fulfill all stated requirements, including placement test and course requirements. Students will be provided with appropriate test and/or course accommodations. Documentation of accommodations provided must be maintained at the institution and summarized in the annual report on accommodations. Accommodations for students with learning disorders that can be granted with institutional approval are limited to the following:

  • Extended time on placement tests
  • Authorized use of a calculator for mathematics testing
  • Separate test administration

Accommodations and test administrations other than those listed above must be approved by an RCLD.


↑ Top

Appendix A: Memorandum: Admitting GED Students, 2006

(Last Modified January 16, 2018)   Report a broken link

Memorandum is no longer applicable.

Students who present a state-issued high school equivalency certificate or diploma earned through the successful completion of a high school equivalency test approved by the BoR may be considered for admission as outlined in Section 3.2.1, High School Graduation.


↑ Top

Appendix B: Pilot Admission Project

(Last Modified September 15, 2011)   Report a broken link

The Pilot Admission Project was approved for adoption May 2005 and modified June 2008.

This project was decommissioned August 2011.


↑ Top

Appendix C: ACT-SAT Concordance Tables

(Last Modified January 20, 2010)   Report a broken link

In 2005, the College Board added a required Writing test to the SAT and ACT added an optional Writing test to the ACT. Before 2005, the ACT and the College Board had periodically produced concordance tables to assist admissions officers who wanted to understand how students of comparable ability would score on the two college entrance examinations. Given the changes to both respective tests, the College Board and ACT are now providing updated concordance tables that are appropriate to the current versions of the two tests. Students who take the SAT receive three separate test scores: Critical Reading, Writing and Mathematics. Students who take the ACT receive a Composite ACT score and four subscores (Reading, English, Math and Science). Students who take the ACT Plus Writing receive the ACT Composite with the corresponding four subscores (Reading, English, Math and Science) and also receive a Writing subscore and a Combined English/Writing subscore. Two separate concordance tables have been developed:

  • Table 1 provides a concordance between the ACT Composite Score and the sum of SAT Critical Reading and Mathematics scores for 300,437 students.

  • Table 2 provides a concordance between the ACT Combined English/Writing Score and the SAT Writing Score for 190,148 students who completed the ACT Plus Writing.

Both tables are based on scores from students who took both tests between September 2004 (for the ACT) or March 2005 (for the SAT) and June 2006. Students in the sample represent the first high school graduating cohort since the introduction of the SAT with Writing and the optional Writing section on the ACT. The sample includes students who completed both tests and were matched across ACT and SAT files. While the ACT and the SAT are different tests, these two tables are provided to help the education community better understand how students of comparable ability will score on the two tests.

Notes to Consider
A research report describing the sample, methodology and results will be published by ACT and the College Board in the coming months. Additional information and updates will be made available on the Web sites of ACT (www.act.org) and College Board (www.collegeboard.org). The following notes and cautions should be considered before using the tables.

  • Because the SAT score scale has more score points than the ACT, a single ACT Composite score concords to a range of SAT scores. In each of the tables, a range of SAT scores is concorded to a single ACT score. For example, in Table 1, the SAT (Critical Reading plus Mathematics) scores of 980 to 1010 are all concorded to an ACT Composite score of 21. For those users who want to concord an ACT score to a single SAT score point, the most appropriate SAT score point within the range is provided. In this example, an ACT Composite score of 21 is concorded to a single SAT score of 990.

  • Many students do not take the ACT Plus Writing. Consequently, the sample used for Table 2 is more restricted than the sample for the other table. Students who took the ACT Plus Writing appear to differ from the total group of ACT test-takers in terms of ability and other relevant factors.

  • Concordance tables are dependent upon the sample used to establish the relationship between the two sets of scores. The ACT-SAT tables are based on an entire cohort of students who completed both tests, but this sample is not representative of either all ACT or SAT test-takers. The tables, therefore, may not be appropriate for use with scores from students who take either ACT only or SAT only. Overall, a student who receives a score on one test will not necessarily obtain the concorded score on the other test.

Table 1: Concordance Between ACT Composite Score
and Sum of SAT Critical Reading and Mathematics Scores

SAT CR+M (Score Range) ACT Composite Score SAT CR+M (SingleScore)
1600 36 1600
1540-1590 35 1560
1490-1530 34 1510
1440-1480 33 1460
1400-1430 32 1420
1360-1390 31 1380
1330-1350 30 1340
1290-1320 29 1300
1250-1280 28 1260
1210-1240 27 1220
1170-1200 26 1190
1130-1160 25 1150
1090-1120 24 1110
1050-1080 23 1070
1020-1040 22 1030
980-1010 21 990
940-970 20 950
900-930 19 910
860-890 18 870
820-850 17 830
770-810 16 790
720-760 15 740
670-710 14 690
620-660 13 640
560-610 12 590
510-550 11 530

Table 2: Concordance Between ACT Combined
English/Writing Score and SAT Writing Score

SAT Writing (Score Range) ACT English/Writing Score SAT Writing (Single Score)
800 36 800
800 35 800
770-790 34 770
730-760 33 740
710-720 32 720
690-700 31 690
660-680 30 670
640-650 29 650
620-630 28 630
610 27 610
590-600 26 590
570-580 25 570
550-560 24 550
530-540 23 530
510-520 22 510
480-500 21 490
470 20 470
450-460 19 450
430-440 18 430
410-420 17 420
390-400 16 400
380 15 380
360-370 14 360
340-350 13 340
320-330 12 330
300-310 11 310

Document Source: (http://professionals.collegeboard.com/profdownload/act-sat-concordance-tables.pdf) (8-2008)


↑ Top

Appendix D: Disability Documentation

(Last Modified November 20, 2015)   Report a broken link

Definition of Disability

An individual must demonstrate that his/her condition meets the definition of a disability under the Rehabilitation Act (1973) and/or the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, 1990, and its Amendment, 2008). The ADA defines a disability as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities when compared to most people in the general population.

Whether a condition is substantially limiting to support an accommodation request is a decision made by qualified professionals based upon multiple sources of information using an individualized assessment. The condition, manner, or duration of an individual’s performance of a major life activity may be useful in determining whether impairment results in a substantial limitation.

Notably, a clinical diagnosis is not synonymous with a disability. As described in the most recent version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, diagnosis of a clinical disorder is insufficient for establishing a disability because “diagnosis does not imply a specific level of impairment or disability” and “impairments, abilities, and disabilities vary widely within each diagnostic category” (APA, 2013, p. 25). Greater information regarding functional limitations in major life activities is required to substantiate a disabling condition relative to most people in the general population.

Generally, the availability of mitigating measures to lessen the effects of a person’s disability will not change the analysis of whether the person has a qualifying disability.

Documentation Considered

The general and specific documentation guidelines detailed below are written for disability service providers, evaluators, and others who are responsible for making determinations of eligibility for academic accommodations in the University System of Georgia (USG) colleges and universities. The guidelines are intended to influence and direct the review of documentation by disability service providers, and encourage consistency of disability service delivery across the USG. During documentation reviews, all eligibility and accommodation decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis and will be informed by an interactive process. Notably, the criteria of the general and specific guidelines need not be met via a single stand-alone psychological, psychoeducational, or neuropsychological report. Institutions will consider all documentation, data, and information provided as potential evidence of a disability and need for accommodation. Considerable weight will be ascribed to documentation of previous diagnoses, disability determinations, and modifications and accommodations received (e.g., Individualized Education Plans [IEPs], Section 504 Plans, confirmation of accommodation eligibility on the SAT). Although considerable weight will be given to the information in various types of documentation, evidence of current substantial limitation should be indicated in the documentation so that appropriate accommodations can be provided. No single criterion in the specific documentation guidelines, in its presence or absence, will rule-in or rule-out eligibility.

Professionals seeking to provide a comprehensive evaluation that will document a disability and verify need for accommodations are encouraged to adhere to the USG guidelines.

General Documentation Guidelines

All institutions are required to have written policies and procedures for review of documentation submitted by students with disabilities. Academic accommodations are provided by the disabilities services office or a designated office at an individual college or university. Decisions for system-level accommodations for cognitive/linguistic disabilities (i.e., learning disabilities, ADHD, autism spectrum disorders, acquired brain injuries, communication disorders, and psychological disorders) are made by the associated Regents’ Center for Learning Disorders. All disability eligibility and accommodation decisions are made on a case-by-case basis.

In order to establish disability status and eligibility for disability services, institutions of the University System of Georgia require documentation from a qualified evaluator that:

  • attests to the presence of a disabling condition as defined by the ADA and
  • demonstrates substantial limitations impacting performance in the academic environment when compared to most people in the general population.

Documentation is used to determine eligibility for disability services, as well as to inform accommodation decision-making.

General documentation guidelines pertain to all disabilities. The following are provided to guide evaluators, students, and family members as they seek to document a disability under the ADA.

Appropriate evaluators

  • Evaluators must be licensed qualified professionals whose training and credentials are consistent with expertise in the disability for which they provide documentation and/or eligibility classification under the IDEA/Section 504.
  • Evaluators may not be friends or family members of the student.

Documentation of a physical and/or mental impairment

  • A diagnostic statement based on the most current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and/or International Classification of Diseases (ICD) should be included, unless the evaluator is unable to do so due to school system regulations.
  • Evaluators should demonstrate how the assessment results meet diagnostic criteria.
  • The progression of the condition should be detailed if its impact on the student’s functioning is expected to change over time.
  • Because diagnostic methodologies vary by disorder, further guidance for meeting this requirement can be found in the specific guidelines.

Documentation of a current substantial limitation in a major life activity

  • The substantial limitation in a major life activity should be described.
  • Quantitative and qualitative information should be used to demonstrate that the difficulties are substantially limiting when compared to most people in the general population.
  • Evidence that the difficulties are substantially limiting to the student in the academic environment should be presented.
  • Because substantial limitations may vary by disorder, further guidance for meeting this requirement can be found in the specific guidelines.
  • In some cases, documentation of a current substantial limitation in the educational domain may be difficult to produce due to use of effective accommodations and interventions. In such cases, the documentation of the substantial limitation should include a description of the substantially limited abilities and skills, the accommodations and interventions implemented to address those limitations, the degree of the effectiveness of each, and justification for continued need.

Accommodation recommendations

  • Any accommodation recommendations made must be supported by a rationale that explains the necessity based on the student’s measured impairments and current substantial limitations.
  • Documentation of accommodations approved in the past is encouraged but does not guarantee approval at the postsecondary level.

Identifying information of the evaluating professional.

  • Identifying information includes the names, signatures, titles, identifying credentials (e.g., license numbers), and contact information of evaluating professionals.
  • Dates of evaluations must be included.

Recency

In order to determine eligibility for disability services and provide the most appropriate accommodations and services, documentation should provide an adequate representation of the student’s current functional abilities. Conditions served vary by developmental course and functional impact. As a result, guidance regarding recency requirements is provided in the specific documentation guidelines for each disorder. However, professional judgment will be used in determining the acceptability of any documentation provided.

Provisional accommodations

For students with a documented history of disability whose documentation fails to meet USG guidelines, institutions are encouraged to provide accommodations provisionally for a period of time (usually one semester) that would be reasonably sufficient for the student to gather the necessary information.


↑ Top

Appendix E: Specific Documentation Guidelines

(Last Modified December 15, 2015)   Report a broken link

The following specific documentation guidelines are organized into nine disability categories:

Learning Disabilities
Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Autism Spectrum Disorders
Acquired Brain Injuries
Psychological Disorders
Sensory Disorders
Mobility Disorders
Systemic Disorders
Communication Disorders
Other Disabilities

In addition, all disability categories are required to follow the general documentation guidelines provided in Appendix D.

Learning Disabilities

Learning disabilities is a general term that refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders manifested by significant difficulties in the acquisition and use of listening, speaking, reading, writing, reasoning, or mathematical skills. These disorders are intrinsic to the individual, presumed to be due to central nervous system dysfunction, and may occur across the life span. Problems in self-regulatory behaviors, social perception, and social interaction may exist with learning disabilities but do not, by themselves, constitute a learning disability. Although learning disabilities may occur concomitantly with other disabilities (e.g., sensory impairment, intellectual disability, serious emotional disturbance), or with extrinsic influences (such as cultural differences, insufficient or inappropriate instruction), they are not the result of those conditions or influences. (From the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities, Learning Disabilities: Issues on Definition)

Specific documentation guidelines for Learning Disabilities include the following:

  • General documentation guidelines listed in Appendix D.

  • Documentation should reflect data collected within the past three years at the time of request for services or after the age of 18 so long as the documentation continues to represent current functioning.

  • Clear and specific identification of a learning disability must be stated. For example, the terms “Learning styles” or “Learning differences” are not synonymous with a learning disability.

  • Documentation of a developmental and educational history consistent with a learning disability.

  • Documentation of learning disabilities should include standardized measures of academic achievement, cognitive/linguistic processing, and/or intellectual functioning that have normative data representing the general population. All standardized measures must be represented by standard scores and percentile ranks based on published age-based norms.

  • Documentation of one or more cognitive/linguistic processing deficits that is associated in a meaningful way with the identified area(s) of academic limitation. Cognitive/linguistic processes commonly associated with academic achievement (selection dependent upon case) include the following:

    • Fluency/Automaticity
    • Executive functioning
    • Memory/Learning
    • Oral Language
    • Phonological Processing
    • Orthographic Processing
    • Visual-Motor
    • Visual-Perceptual/Visual-Spatial
  • Documentation suggesting that the academic limitations are unexpected is necessary. As a result, evidence that substantially limited areas of achievement fall significantly below higher-level cognitive and/or linguistic abilities (e.g., broad intellectual functioning, reasoning, vocabulary, crystallized knowledge) must be included.

  • Objective (quantitative and qualitative) evidence that symptoms are associated with significant functional impairment in the academic setting. In the case of Learning Disabilities, documentation must include evidence of substantial limitation(s) in one or more of the following areas of academic achievement:

    • Reading (decoding, fluency, and/or comprehension)
    • Mathematics (calculations, math fluency, and/or applied reasoning)
    • Written Language (spelling, fluency, and/or written expression)
  • Academic impairments, processing deficits, and evidence of intact functioning in other domains (e.g., higher-level cognitive functioning), should be evident on multiple measures.

  • Documentation that alternative explanations for the academic and cognitive/linguistic limitation(s) have been considered and ruled out (e.g., low cognitive ability, other mental or neurological disorders, lack of adequate education, visual or auditory dysfunction, emotional factors such as anxiety or depression, cultural/language differences, poor motivation, symptom exaggeration).

return to top

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD)

AD/HD is a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that is more frequently displayed and more severe than is typically observed in individuals at a comparable level of development. By definition, the disorder is developmental in nature, and therefore, diagnosis requires the manifestation of several symptoms prior to age 12 years. Furthermore, a diagnosis of AD/HD is not sufficient, in and of itself, to determine appropriate accommodations. Therefore, objective data provided in a comprehensive assessment of cognitive processing and academic functioning may be required to establish the nature and severity of the student’s functional limitations. Such data may include, but are not limited to, the following: rating scale information, performance on continuous performance tasks, cognitive processing test results, and/or the results of achievement tests.

Specific documentation guidelines for AD/HD include the following:

  • General documentation guidelines listed in Appendix D.

  • Documentation should reflect data collected within the past three years at the time of request for services.

  • A diagnosis consistent with the most recent DSM/ICD.

  • Evidence of the following diagnostic criteria must be included in the documentation:

    • Some evidence, beyond simple self-report, of clinically significant inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms prior to the age of 12 (in accordance with the DSM). Possible data sources for evidence of early symptoms include the following: parent/guardian report, medical reports, school records, and past evaluations.
    • Evidence of current clinically significant symptoms of either inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity must be documented using appropriate standardized rating scales or norm-referenced measures of cognitive/executive functioning that provide comparisons to similarly aged individuals. However, in some cases, a detailed written statement from a qualified evaluator who has sufficient experience with the student and the student’s symptom history may be sufficient.
    • Symptom presence must be assessed using student self-report and corroborated by an independent informant who has been able to observe the student’s recent functioning.
    • Current clinically significant symptoms must be present in at least two settings and interfere with social, academic, or occupational functioning.
  • Verifiable evidence that symptoms are associated with significant functional impairment in the academic setting. Suggested sources for evidence of academic functional impairment include the results of a comprehensive psycho-educational evaluation, school records, and/or a comprehensive clinical interview that is described in a written statement by the evaluator.

return to top

Autism Spectrum Disorders

Autism Spectrum Disorders are characterized by impairment in several areas of development including social communication and social interaction across contexts, and the presence of restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests or activities.

Specific documentation guidelines for Autism Spectrum Disorder include the following:

  • General documentation guidelines listed in Appendix D.

  • Documentation should reflect data collected within the past three years at the time of request for services.

  • A diagnosis consistent with the most recent DSM/ICD.

  • Assessment of the following diagnostic criteria is required and evaluation results should include:

    • Developmental history that includes evidence of Autism Spectrum Disorder symptoms in early childhood.
    • Documentation of current qualitative impairment in social interaction and social communication and their level of severity. A standardized assessment approach is encouraged (e.g. Autism Diagnostic Observation System; Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised; Social Communications Questionnaire).
    • Documentation of current restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, and activities and their level of severity.
    • Assessment of broad cognitive ability using standardized assessment measures with age-appropriate norms (e.g., WAIS-IV, DAS, RIAS, C-TONI).
  • Documentation of current functional impact or limitation of the disability on learning or other major life activities and how it impacts the individual in the learning environment. This may be in the form of a comprehensive psychoeducational evaluation, school records, and/or other relevant records.

return to top

Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

Brain injury can result from external trauma, such as a closed head or an object penetration injury, or internal trauma, such as a cerebral vascular accident or tumor. Additionally, individuals may acquire brain impairment as a result of neurological illnesses, such as epilepsy or multiple sclerosis. ABI can cause physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and vocational changes that can affect an individual for a short period of time or permanently. Depending on the location and extent of the injury, symptoms can vary widely. Understanding functional changes after an injury and resulting implications for education are more important than only knowing the cause or type of injury.

Specific documentation guidelines for ABI include the following:

  • General documentation guidelines listed in Appendix D.

  • Impairments following an acquired brain injury may change rapidly in the weeks and months after the injury, and a more stable picture of residual weaknesses may not be apparent for 1-2 years after an injury. Therefore, timeframes for currency of documentation may vary substantially, and additional documentation may be necessary to adequately assess the student’s current accommodation needs.

  • A diagnosis consistent with the most recent DSM/ICD, if appropriate.

  • Documentation of the date or period of time of occurrence and diagnosis.

  • Documentation of the nature of the neurological illness or traumatic event that resulted in brain injury.

  • Objective (quantitative and qualitative) evidence that symptoms are associated with significant functional impairment in the academic setting. The functional impact of the brain injury must be documented by appropriate, objective measures (e.g., cognitive and academic skills, psychosocial-emotional functioning, and/or motor/sensory abilities) relevant to the academic environment.

Notably, in most cases, a concussion is a temporary condition that will require temporary accommodations for approximately one semester, as deemed appropriate by a qualified professional.

return to top

Psychological Disorders

Many different psychological disorders can interfere with cognitive, emotional, and social functioning and may negatively impact a student’s ability to function in an academic environment. Some individuals experience significant disruptions in mood, thinking, and behavioral regulation that are secondary to a psychological disorder. The symptoms and associated impairment may be either chronic or episodic. Complete descriptions and diagnostic criteria for psychological disorders are available in the current version of the DSM or ICD. Test anxiety by itself is not considered a psychological disorder.

Specific documentation guidelines for psychological disorders include the following:

  • General documentation guidelines listed in Appendix D.

  • Documentation should reflect data collected within three years at the time of request for services; however, more recent documentation may be required by a disability service provider on a case-by-case basis.

  • A diagnosis consistent with the most recent DSM/ICD.

  • Description of history, current symptoms, and severity of the disorder.

  • Additional descriptions of (1) the expected progression, duration, and stability of the condition and (2) relevant side effects of medications are strongly encouraged.

  • Description of current functional limitations impacting academic performance resulting from the disorder.

return to top

Sensory Disorders

Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing experience a reduction in sensitivity to sound. Amplification may not assist the individual in interpreting auditory stimuli. Individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing from birth may experience lags in the development of speech and most often have language-based deficiencies.

Specific documentation requirements for hearing disorders include the following:

  • General documentation guidelines listed in Appendix D.

  • Documentation should reflect data collected within three years of the request for services unless the condition is of a permanent and non-varying nature. However, if additional accommodations are requested due to changes in functional limitations, updated documentation may be requested.

  • A diagnosis consistent with the most recent DSM/ICD, if appropriate.

  • Description of the history, current symptoms, and severity of the disorder, (e.g., audiogram and audiological summary).

  • Description of the expected progression or stability of the disorder.

  • Description of the current functional limitations impacting the student in the academic setting.

Blind and Loss of Vision
Visual impairments are disorders in the function of the eyes that have not been adequately corrected by medical or surgical intervention, therapy, or conventional eyewear. Individuals with visual disorders may not have any usable vision or the vision may be significantly limited.

Specific documentation requirements for visual disorders include the following:

  • General documentation guidelines listed in Appendix D.

  • Documentation should reflect data collected within three years of the request for services unless the condition is of a permanent and non-varying nature. However, if additional accommodations are requested due to changes in functional limitations, updated documentation may be requested.

  • A diagnosis consistent with the most recent DSM/ICD, if appropriate.

  • Description of the history, current symptoms, and severity of the disorder, (e.g., ocular report).

  • Description of the expected progression or stability of the disorder.

  • Description of the current functional limitations impacting the student in the academic setting.

return to top

Mobility Disorders

Mobility impairments refer to conditions that limit a person’s coordination or ability to move. Some mobility impairments are congenital while others are the result of illness or physical injury. The functional abilities and limitations resulting from the impairment will vary from individual to individual.

Specific documentation requirements for mobility disorders include the following:

  • General documentation guidelines listed in Appendix D.

  • Documentation should reflect data collected within three years of the request for services unless the condition is of a permanent and non-varying nature. However, if additional accommodations are requested due to changes in functional limitations, updated documentation may be requested.

  • A diagnosis consistent with the most recent DSM/ICD, if appropriate.

  • Description of the history, current symptoms, and severity of the disorder.

  • Description of the expected progression or stability of the disorder.

  • Description of the current functional limitations impacting the student in the academic setting.

return to top

Systemic Disorders

Systemic disabilities are conditions affecting one or more of the body’s systems, including the respiratory, immunological neurological, circulatory, or digestive systems. Systemic disabilities may change over time. Therefore, the need for - and type of - reasonable accommodations may require updated documentation.

Specific documentation requirements for systemic disorders include the following:

  • General documentation guidelines listed in Appendix D.

  • Documentation should reflect data collected within three years of the request for services unless the condition is of a permanent or non-varying nature. However, if additional accommodations are requested due to changes in functional limitations, updated documentation may be requested.

  • A diagnosis consistent with the most recent DSM/ICD, if appropriate.

  • Description of the history, current symptoms, and severity of the disorder.

  • Description of the expected progression or stability of the disorder.

  • Description of the current functional limitations impacting the student in the academic setting.

Communications Disorders

Communication disorders is a general term that refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders manifested by significant difficulties in language, speech and, communication. This includes difficulties in receptive and expressive language, including the production of sounds, articulation and fluency deficits, difficulty in the acquisition and production of language across modalities (i.e., spoken, written), and difficulties in the social use of verbal and nonverbal communication.

Specific documentation guidelines for Communication Disorders include the following:

  • General documentation guidelines listed in Appendix D.

  • Documentation should reflect data collected within the past three years at the time of request for services.

  • A diagnosis consistent with the most recent DSM/ICD.

  • Evaluation/Assessment of the following diagnostic criteria is required and evaluation results should include:

    • Developmental history of the communication difficulties in early childhood, unless acquired later in life, in which the resulting event and disorder history should be documented.
    • A summary of present symptoms which meet the criteria for diagnosis of a communication disorder.
    • Treatments, medications, accommodations/auxiliary aids, services currently prescribed or in use.
  • Objective (quantitative and qualitative) evidence that symptoms are associated with significant functional impairment in the academic setting. Suggested sources for evidence of academic functional impairment include the results of a comprehensive psycho-educational evaluation, speech/language evaluation, neurological report, physical evaluation report, and/or school records.

Other Disabilities

Disabilities as defined by the ADA that are not covered by the guidelines described above may be eligible for accommodations within USG policies. For more information, please contact the disability services office or other designated office at the USG institution in which you are enrolled or seeking services.


↑ Top

Appendix F: Regents’ Centers for Learning Disorders

(Last Modified December 17, 2015)   Report a broken link

Each Regents’ Center for Learning Disorders (RCLD) is responsible for serving designated colleges and universities within a geographic region (referring institutions). The host institution serves as fiscal agent for each Center.

Georgia Southern University
Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College East Georgia State College
Albany State University East Georgia State College - Statesboro
Armstrong State University Georgia Southern University
Bainbridge State College Savannah State University
College of Coastal Georgia South Georgia State College
Darton State College Valdosta State University
Georgia State University
Atlanta Metropolitan College Georgia Southwestern State University
Clayton State UniversityGeorgia State University
Perimeter College of Georgia State University
Columbus State University Gordon State College
Dalton State CollegeKennesaw State University
Georgia Highlands CollegeUniversity of West Georgia
Georgia Institute of Technology
University of Georgia
Georgia Gwinnett College Fort Valley State University
Middle Georgia State University Augusta University
University of North Georgia University of Georgia
Georgia College & State University

↑ Top

Appendix G: Referral Packet Flowchart

(Last Modified January 13, 2010)   Report a broken link

Referral Process


↑ Top

Appendix H: Admission Consideration Flowchart

(Last Modified January 13, 2010)   Report a broken link

Admission Consideration Flowchart


↑ Top

3.4 Student Affairs Professionals Resource Guide

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

Student Affairs Professionals Resource Guide


↑ Top

3.3.6 Core Mathematics Course Substitutions

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

Last reviewed: February 2019

As a part of the core curriculum, all USG students are required to complete three hours of coursework that address learning outcomes in quantitative reasoning (i.e., core mathematics requirement; Learning Goal A2: Quantitative Outcomes)

Students who are unable to complete this core mathematics requirement as a result of a documented disability must still complete the core curriculum but may petition for a substitution of the requirement.

To be eligible for a core mathematics substitution, it must be determined that (1) a student has a disability currently impacting his or her mathematics skill that precludes the potential for academic success despite reasonable accommodations and good faith effort and (2) substitution of the core curriculum mathematics course will not result in a fundamental alteration of the nature of the student’s major/program of study.

Eligibility determinations will follow the procedure as outlined below.

  • The student will submit petition materials to the Disability Services Office of the student’s home institution. The materials should minimally include the following:

    1. a formal written request for a mathematics core course substitution,
    2. documentation of a disability that substantially limits mathematics skills relative to most people in the general population as determined by a qualified professional,
    3. secondary and postsecondary transcripts documenting prior mathematics coursework, and
    4. a signed consent form authorizing release of the documentation to the reviewing parties.
  • Documentation should meet guidelines as specified in Appendix D: Disability Documentation and Appendix E: Specific Documentation Guidelines.

  • The disability service provider will submit the request and associated documentation to the RCLD serving the institution, which will determine whether the documentation provided is sufficient to justify a substitution for the core mathematics requirement. The RCLD may seek additional information from the student to aid in their decision-making.

Students wishing to dispute the decision of the RCLD for the home institution with regard to eligibility for substitution of the core mathematics requirement may appeal by submitting a request for a second review of their documentation by the directors of the other two RCLDs. The appeal request must meet the following conditions:

  • Specify the issue(s) of disagreement in writing.

  • Be submitted to the DSP at the student’s home institution.

  • Be initiated within 30 days of receiving the disputed decision.

A student wishing to dispute the decision of the second RCLD review may appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs (VPAA) or Provost of the home institution. A student wishing to dispute the decision of the VPAA/Provost may appeal to the President of the home institution.

If a request for a core mathematics substitution is made within a reasonable time after the start of the semester (to be determined by the institution), the decision on the student’s request should be completed within a timely manner such that the student can make informed registration decisions for the next semester.

Should the student be deemed eligible for a substitution, an institution-level committee will determine if the core mathematics requirement represents an essential component of the student’s major/program of study. The committee should, at minimum, include designees from the Office of Disability Services, the Department of Mathematics, the petitioning student’s school or college (e.g., the student’s academic advisor), and the institution’s committee charged with providing oversight of the general education curriculum.

If the student is found to be pursuing a major/program of study for which mathematics is not considered an essential component, the institution-level committee will identify a substitute course best suited to the student’s major/program of study.

Each institution shall develop policies and procedures detailing the institution-level committee composition; committee responsibilities; title of the final decision-making authority; methods of communication between the committee, the final decision-making authority, and the student; time frames for the completion of each step; and an appeals process.

Approval of a petition for a course substitution for the core mathematics requirement extends to Learning Support requirements in mathematics.

The approval of a petition for substitution of the core mathematics requirement does not waive the requirement. If the student changes major/program of study, the substitution as well as any unsatisfied Learning Support requirements in mathematics may be re-evaluated.

Further, approval of a petition for a course substitution for the core mathematics requirement does not extend to the requirements of certain majors/programs of study. Students must submit a separate petition, following their institution’s standard procedures for modifications to program requirements, to request a course substitution for mathematics coursework required for a specific major/program of study.

In addition to Core Area A2, students may be required to take mathematics and science courses with mathematical prerequisites in Area D. Students with approved mathematics substitutions for Area A2 mathematics courses should make every effort to complete Area D by taking non-mathematics courses and science courses that do not have mathematics prerequisites.

Institutions may waive mathematics prerequisites for Area D sciences courses for students with RCLD approval for Area A2 mathematics substitutions if there is a reasonable chance that the students will be successful in the courses without the Area A2 mathematics prerequisite.

Only if all efforts to complete Area D courses without mathematical prerequisites or by waiving mathematics prerequisites have been exhausted may students with RCLD approval for Area A2 mathematics substitutions petition their institutions for substitutions for Area D courses. Before approving Area D substitutions, institutions must verify that it is not possible for students to complete Area D without mathematics prerequisites. Institutions may not approve substitutions for Area D courses that may be taken without mathematics prerequisites. The maximum number of substitutions that may be approved is equal to the number of required Area D courses minus the number of Area D courses that may be taken without mathematics prerequisites. For example, if three Area D courses are required, and one Area D course is available with no mathematic prerequisites, then a maximum of two course substitutions may be approved.


↑ Top

3.1.1 Admission Requirements for Programs Leading to an Associate or Baccalaureate Degree

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2, UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION

The following section provides the standards, procedures, and guidelines related to the admission of undergraduate applicants. Institutions have the authority, unless explicitly prohibited by policy, to require additional or higher requirements for general admission to the institution or to special programs at the undergraduate level.

Institutions seeking exceptions to policy or these standards, procedures, and guidelines must receive written approval from the USG’s Chief Academic Officer and must maintain record of the approval.

The USG Office of Student Affairs provides the following documents to provide prospective students, parents, and high school counselors with easy access to the admission requirements for the system institutions:

Institutions must promptly notify the USG Office of Student Affairs when admission requirements are revised so these documents may be appropriately updated.

3.1.1.1 Freshman Requirements

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.1.1, FRESHMAN REQUIREMENTS

These criteria apply to freshman applicants and applicants who have not earned the equivalent of 30 semester hours of transferable credit. Applicants who are not of the traditional college-going age may be eligible for consideration under the requirements for non-traditional student admission.

Academic Record
Institutions shall require completion of the USG’s Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) and graduation from a public school regulated by a school system and state department of education or graduation from a high school accredited by one of the following approved accrediting bodies:

The RHSC is comprised of the following 17 units:

  • Four units of mathematics to include:

    • One unit of Coordinate Algebra or Algebra I or the equivalent;
    • One unit of Analytic Geometry or Geometry or the equivalent;
    • One unit of Advanced Algebra or Algebra II or the equivalent; and,
    • One additional approved fourth mathematics unit.

  • Four units of English which have as their emphasis grammar and usage, literature (American, English, World), and advanced composition skills.
  • Four units of science with at least one laboratory course from the life sciences and one laboratory course from the physical sciences. The four units shall include the following for Georgia Public high school graduates:

    • One unit of Biology I or the equivalent;
    • One unit of Physical Science or Physics or the equivalent;
    • One unit of Chemistry, Earth Systems, Environmental Science, or an Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate science course or the equivalent; and,
    • One additional approved science unit.

  • Three units of social science, with at least one unit focusing on United States studies and one unit focusing on world studies.
  • Two units of the same foreign language emphasizing speaking, listening and writing, or 2 units of American Sign Language, or 2 units of computer science emphasizing coding and programming.

The Office of Student Affairs maintains a complete list of courses that can be used to satisfy the RHSC requirements on the Staying on Course document.

Applicants graduating from non-accredited homeschools or high schools may demonstrate their graduation and completion of the RHSC in an alternative way:

  • An applicant who has completed the equivalent of each of the areas of the RHSC may document completion through the submission of a portfolio of work and/or other evidence.
  • An applicant who has achieved designated scores on each of the following SAT Subject Tests in an area will be considered to have demonstrated equivalent competence:

    • English
    • Literature
    • Math Level 1 or Math Level 2
    • U.S. History
    • World History
    • Biology E/M
    • Chemistry or Physics.

Applicants graduating from non-accredited homeschools or high schools with documentation of partial completion of the RHSC may be admitted on the same basis and with the same conditions as other applicants with deficiencies.

High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA)

A minimum 2.0 High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA) is required. The HSGPA is calculated on a 4.0 scale using the 17 units of the RHSC. Numerical grades indicated on transcripts should be converted to letter grades based on the conversion table provided by the high school. Institutions must obtain these tables. The letter grades should be converted to quality points as follows:

  • A = 4
  • B = 3
  • C = 2
  • D = 1
  • F = 0

The HSGPA may be calculated using the best grade or grades when the high school transcript indicates more than the required number of courses were taken in an RHSC area. When the transcript indicates two foreign languages were completed in high school, the two units with the best grades may be included in the HSGPA provided those units are comprised of the same foreign language. Institutions are required to use a standard procedure to calculate the HSGPA for reporting to the BoR, which includes not adding weights. Institutions may use other methods of HSGPA calculation for determining admission eligibility.

SAT/ACT Scores

Institutions may consider the highest scores from the same test type when scores from more than one test date are submitted. A combination of SAT and ACT scores cannot be considered.

Freshman Index

Institutions may utilize the highest SAT ERW and Math scores when scores from more than one test date are submitted.

3.1.1.2 International Freshman Requirements

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.1.2, INTERNATIONAL FRESHMAN REQUIREMENTS

Freshman international applicants may be considered for admission in any category or in this special category. International applicants may also be admitted as Presidential Exceptions.

Applicants whose secondary education was completed outside the United States system of education may be admitted with acceptable foreign credentials and English language proficiency as described below:

  • Foreign Credentials
    Academic performance described by a certificate, diploma, or other document deemed generally equivalent to a U.S. required high school curriculum by a reputable credential evaluator (internal or external to the institution) is acceptable.
  • English Language Proficiency Requirements
    Completion of a test of English language proficiency is required of all applicants. Please refer to the chart below for approved exams and minimum standards or some other USG-approved evaluation of English.

The minimum and recommended scores acceptable for admission:

 Minimum Score for Admission*Recommended Score for Admission
Internet TOEFL6979
Paper TOEFL (only accepted until October 2019)523550
IELTS66.5
Old SAT (Administered prior to March 2016) Critical Reading section 430  
New SAT (Administered March 2016 or later) Reading test 24  
ACT English 17  
EIKEN Pre-1  
MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery) 77  
Cambridge English Scale Score - which can be demonstrated in B2 First (First Certificate in English -FCE), C1 Advanced (Certificate in Advanced English - CAE) or C2 Proficiency (Certificate of Proficiency in English - CPE)169177
Cambridge International Examinations (CIE) IGCSE and “O” Level “English” exams“D” or Better 
UK GCSE “English” exam“C” or Better 
UK GCE A-Level “English” exam“C” or Better 
EdExcel International A-Levels and IGCSE English exams“D” or Better 
Pearson (PTE) Academic5358
Completion of an approved USG campus-based ESL program of study.Per USG approval. 
A waiver of the English proficiency requirement can be applied to students who have successfully completed academic instruction in English. Successful completion can be demonstrated by one of the following methods: 1) Proof of degree at the secondary or collegiate level either outside or inside the U.S. where English is the official language of academic instruction. 2) Proof of completion of the equivalent of English 1101 and/or 1102 with a grade of C or better in one or both courses, at an accredited U.S. institution.Per USG campus review. 
Students who are required to take Compass or Accuplacer placement tests, may be waived of the English Proficiency requirement if the calculated EPI places them directly into college level English with no required co-requisite.Per USG campus review. 

*Institutions and departmental programs within the institution may set higher minimum test scores for admission.

English and Math admissions criteria, including the SAT or ACT, and placement criteria are required for international students.

Institutions may develop procedures to determine whether there is a need for placement in Learning Support English and/or ESL courses for students who meet the minimum English Proficiency requirements. An academically admissible applicant with credentials from another country who meets the minimum English Proficiency requirements (as indicated by an approved method for determining English Proficiency described above), but could benefit from supplemental English language instruction may be admitted to a degree program on the condition that the student will receive the supplemental English language instruction in a System-approved program . If a student does not meet the minimum English Proficiency requirements (as indicated by an approved method for determining English Proficiency described above), then the student cannot be granted regular admission. If an institution has an approved English-as-a-Second Language program then the student can be referred to and admitted into that program*. Programs of English-as-a Second Language used under this provision must be approved by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer.

*Please note that for these cases for F-1 students, the English-as-a-Second Language program must be approved by the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) via an I-17. The I-20 for this type of case must be issued reflecting English Language Study.

U.S. Immigration Regulations

Federal regulations place significant responsibilities on students and universities in the administration of the U.S. laws pertaining to F-1 or J-1 non-immigrant students. Institutions are required to follow certain record-keeping and reporting requirements of the U.S. government.

Institutions enrolling international students are required to determine the academic admissibility and the financial resources of applicants prior to the issuance of the immigration document I-20 or DS-2019.

Only a Designated School Official appointed by the institution’s president and registered with the Student Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) may sign form I-20 and other F-1 student immigration-related documents. Only a Responsible Officer or Alternate Responsible Officer approved by the U.S. Department of State and SEVP may sign form DS-2019. For more information, see http://www.ice.gov/sevis/.

3.1.1.3 Exceptions to Freshman Requirements

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.1.3, EXCEPTIONS TO FRESHMAN REQUIREMENTS

The following are modified or additional requirements for specific groups of applicants.

Limited Admission
In recognition of the fact that a limited number of applicants do not meet established standards but demonstrate special potential for success, institutions may admit a limited number of applicants under the Limited Admission category.

The Limited Admission category of admission is comprised of a general Limited Admission provision and a Presidential Exception provision. Institutions are restricted by sector to a maximum number of applicants who may be admitted in this category. The number of traditional freshmen who can be granted Limited Admission for the entire academic year will be no more than the following percentages of the institution’s annual first-time freshman headcount enrollment.

Research UniversitiesUp to 7 percent
Comprehensive UniversitiesUp to 15 percent
State UniversitiesUp to 20 percent
State CollegesUp to 33 percent

Non-traditional freshmen are not included in the Limited Admissions percentage nor are they included in determining the base.

Limited Admission Provision
Institutions may consider applicants meeting all of the following for admission under this provision:

Research Universities

  • Graduation from high school and completion of the RHSC as outlined in Section 3.1.1.1
  • 24 on the Reading test and 22 on the Math test of the new SAT (administered March 2016 or later);
    430 SAT Critical Reading and 400 SAT Math (administered prior to March 2016); or, 17 ACT English and 17 ACT Math
  • 2020 Freshman Index

Comprehensive Universities

  • Graduation from high school and completion of the RHSC as outlined in Section 3.1.1.1.
  • 24 on the Reading test and 22 on the Math test of the new SAT (administered March 2016 or later); 430 SAT Critical Reading and 400 SAT Math (administered prior to March 2016); or, 17 ACT English and 17 ACT Math
  • 1830 Freshman Index

State Universities

  • Graduation from high school and completion of the RHSC as outlined in Section 3.1.1.1
  • 24 on the Reading test and 22 on the Math test of the new SAT (administered March 2016 or later); 430 SAT Critical Reading and 400 SAT Math (administered prior to March 2016); or, 17 ACT English and 17 ACT Math
  • 1790 Freshman Index

State Colleges

  • Graduation from high school as outlined in Section 3.1.1.1; or,
  • A state-issued high school equivalency diploma or certificate earned through the successful completion of the GED, TASC or HiSet test. An applicant who presents a state-issued high school diploma or certificate is expected to be at least 18 years of age and for his or her high school class to have graduated; however, institutions may make exceptions on a case-by-case basis. Certificates of attendance or special education diplomas are not acceptable.

Presidential Exception Provision
Each institution President or his or her designee may, under special and rare circumstances, grant exceptions to the above general Limited Admission provision if the applicant shows promise for academic success. Institutions shall use multiple measures, such as interviews, portfolios, and records of experiential achievements whenever possible.

At least one of the following must be held for consideration under the Presidential Exception provision:

  • A high school diploma from an accredited or approved high school as specified in Section 3.1.1.1 (certificate of attendance or special education diplomas are not acceptable)
  • A state-issued high school equivalency certificate or diploma earned through the successful completion of the GED, TASC, or HiSet test. An applicant who presents a state-issued diploma or certificate is expected to be at least 18 years of age and for his or her high school class to have graduated; however, institutions may make exceptions on a case-by-case basis. Certificates of attendance or special education diplomas are not acceptable.

Applicants admitted under the Presidential Exception provision are included in the number allowed for an institution under the Limited Admission category.

Applicants admitted with RHSC deficiencies shall be required to satisfy those deficiencies as outlined in the “Addressing RHSC Deficiencies” section below.

Summary of Minimum Freshman Admission Requirements
SectorRegular AdmissionLimited Admission ProvisionPresidential Exception Provision
Research Universities
  • High school diploma
  • 17 RHSC units
  • 2.0 HSGPA
  • 2500 FI
  • 24 Reading test and
    22 Math test (SAT taken March 2016 or later);
    430 SAT Critical Reading and 400 SAT Math (SAT taken prior to March 2016); or,
    17 ACT English and
    17 ACT Math
  • High school diploma
  • 17 RHSC units
  • 2.0 HSGPA
  • 2020 FI
  • 24 Reading test and 22 Math test (SAT taken March 2016 or later); 430 SAT Critical Reading and 400 SAT Math (SAT taken prior to March 2016); or, 17 ACT English and 17 ACT Math
High school diploma or approved state-issued high school equivalency certificate or diploma
Comprehensive Universities
  • High school diploma
  • 17 RHSC units
  • 2.0 HSGPA
  • 2040 FI
  • 24 Reading test and
    22 Math test (SAT taken March 2016 or later);
    430 SAT Critical Reading and 400 SAT Math (SAT taken prior to March 2016); or,
    17 ACT English and
    17 ACT Math
  • High school diploma
  • 17 RHSC units
  • 2.0 HSGPA
  • 1830 FI
  • 24 Reading test and
    22 Math test (SAT taken March 2016 or later);
    430 SAT Critical Reading and 400 SAT Math (SAT taken prior to March 2016); or,
    17 ACT English and
    17 ACT Math
High school diploma or approved state-issued high school equivalency certificate or diploma
State Universities
  • High school diploma
  • 17 RHSC units
  • 2.0 HSGPA
  • 1940 FI
  • 24 Reading test and
    22 Math test (SAT taken March 2016 or later);
    430 SAT Critical Reading and 400 SAT Math (SAT taken prior to March 2016);
    or,17 ACT English and 17 ACT Math
  • High school diploma
  • 17 RHSC units
  • 2.0 HSGPA
  • 1790 FI
  • 24 Reading test and
    22 Math test (SAT taken March 2016 or later);
    430 SAT Critical Reading and 400 SAT Math (SAT taken prior to March 2016); or,
    17 ACT English and 17 ACT Math
High school diploma or approved state-issued high school equivalency certificate or diploma
State Colleges
  • High school diploma
  • 17 RHSC units
High school diploma or approved state-issued high school equivalency certificate or diploma

Addressing RHSC Deficiencies
Applicants with RHSC deficiencies shall be required to satisfy deficiencies using one of the following methods:

Address Deficiency Prior to Enrollment
Applicants, including those coming from other states, who have Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) deficiencies but can demonstrate competency in the deficient area(s) will be deemed as meeting the RHSC requirements. Provided these applicants meet all other requirements for regular admission for the sector of institution to which he/she is applying, the institution will not be required to admit them under the Limited Admissions category.

An applicant can satisfy an RHSC deficiency by demonstrating competency in the subject matter area(s) considered deficient or by addressing the deficiency through an appropriate course successfully completed prior to enrollment at a USG institution. Institutions may set additional and/or higher requirements for demonstrating subject matter proficiency than those listed below.

Option 1: Demonstrate Subject Matter Proficiency Through Approved Standardized Tests
An applicant may demonstrate competency through standardized examinations such as the SAT, ACT, CLEP, DSST or other comparable examinations approved by the BoR. Written requests to use other examinations should be submitted to Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

Please note that applicants must complete four Board of Regents-approved science units, including two units with a laboratory component, as outlined in the Staying on Course document. Additionally, Georgia public high school students are required to complete coursework in four areas: 1) one unit of biology; 2) one unit of physical science or physics; 3) one unit of chemistry, earth systems, environmental science or an advanced placement science course; and 4) one unit of any other Board of Regents-approved science course listed on the Staying on Course document. Applicants with a science deficiency may address the deficiency prior to enrollment through a standardized examination provided the examination demonstrates competency in an area not already reflected in their high school coursework.

  1. An applicant whose SAT or ACT score in the deficient area is at or above the average SAT or ACT score of the previous year’s fall semester first-time freshmen admitted to the USG institution indicates competency in the area.
  2. An applicant may use the following SAT Subject Tests to demonstrate competency in a deficient area: English, Writing, Literature, Foreign Languages, Math Level 1 or Math Level 2, American History & Social Studies, World History, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Students may use SAT Subject Tests to demonstrate exposure and competencies for areas not reflected in their course work. Institutions using SAT Subject Tests to validate a student’s high school curriculum requirements are expected to establish required scores needed to demonstrate subject matter proficiency.
  3. An applicant may use the CLEP and DSST subject examination to demonstrate competency in a deficient area. Institutions using CLEP or DSST to validate a student’s high school curriculum requirements are expected to establish required scores needed to demonstrate subject matter proficiency. When possible institutions should refer to the credit recommendations of the American Council on Education Guide.
  4. Applicants with an English deficiency and placed into Learning Support English will satisfy the deficiency upon successfully exiting Learning Support English. Applicants with a mathematics deficiency and placed into Learning Support mathematics will satisfy the deficiency upon successfully exiting Learning Support mathematics. See Section 2.9.1 of the Academic and Student Affairs Handbook for more information on Learning Support exemption and placement.
  5. Comparable examinations approved by the BoR. Written requests to use other examinations should be submitted to Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

Option 2: Demonstrate Subject Matter Proficiency Through Approved Coursework.
An applicant may address the deficiency prior to enrollment by taking a USG-approved high school course in the deficiency area(s) or a three credit collegiate course (with a course grade of “C” or better) in the appropriate subject area(s). An applicant who has taken a terminal course in a subject area (for example, a student who has completed calculus in the 11th grade) will be deemed as meeting the RHSC requirement in that subject area.

Address Deficiency After Enrollment
Students who have RHSC deficiencies, which are addressed after enrollment, can be admitted under the Limited Admissions category. Students who have RHSC deficiencies and who successfully complete collegiate courses addressing all of their deficiencies within their first 30 credit hours will be considered as having satisfied the deficiency or deficiencies. These students will receive collegiate credit that can count towards the student’s degree program. If a student does not address the deficiencies within the first 30 credit hours, then the student may not register for other courses, unless they also register for the appropriate deficiency course or courses. Successful completion (“C” or better) of a three credit collegiate course in the appropriate subject area demonstrates collegiate-level preparedness and is sufficient for satisfying an RHSC deficiency in that subject area.

Admission of Applicants with Outstanding Scores
BoR Policy 4.2.1.3 permits institutions to consider those applicants who, through test scores and personal achievement, have demonstrated their potential for success in college. However, institutions are advised to assess the applicant’s readiness to do college work. Factors that should be considered include academic experience, historical attendance patterns, and level of maturity. Students under the age of 18 are at greater risk for failure, and institutions are advised to admit only those students who show the greatest potential for success. Institutions seeking to enroll students under the age of 16 should consult federal guidelines for compliance rules before offering letters of acceptance.

Applicants admitted under the Admission of Applicants with Outstanding Scores provision are not counted against the institution’s Limited Admission Exceptions.

Admission of Students with Disabilities
Applicants who meet regular admission requirements should be admitted without regard to disabilities. Applicants with documented disabilities seeking admission to a USG institution are required to meet the RHSC requirements and achieve the institution’s SAT or ACT score requirements with testing accommodations. Applicants who are unable to meet the foreign language requirement due to a documented disability may petition for a course substitution following the procedures described in Section 3.11.3. See Section 3.11 for additional information regarding students with disabilities.

3.1.1.4 Dual Enrollment Requirements

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.1.4, DUAL ENROLLMENT REQUIREMENTS

The USG provides the following two opportunities for high school students to enroll prior to their high school graduation:

  • Dual Enrollment provides eligible high school students with the opportunity to enroll in postsecondary courses for both high school and college credit.
  • Joint Enrollment provides eligible high school students with the opportunity to enroll in postsecondary courses for college credit only.

General Admission Requirements

Institutions shall establish requirements of at least the following for Dual Enrollment admission:

  • Enrollment in a public school regulated by a school system of state department of education or a school accredited by one of the approved accrediting bodies provided in Section 3.1.1.1;
  • Minimum SAT score of 970 (combined Verbal/Critical Reading and Mathematics sections) or ACT composite of 20. Institutions seeking to use alternative placement test(s) must seek prior approval from the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG;
  • Minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 3.0 as calculated by the institution for admission purposes;
  • Exemption of all Learning Support requirements;
  • Written consent of parent or guardian if the student is a minor; and,
  • Evidence in the transcript that student is on track towards the completion of the USG RHSC requirements and high school graduation.

Homeschooled students may be considered if they are enrolled in Non-traditional Educational Centers that are recognized by GAPSAC or by state departments of education. Students attending non-accredited home school programs or non-accredited high schools may also be eligible to participate if they meet all general admission requirements for dual enrollment and have validated they are on-track for completing the Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) units according to the policy of the institution to which they are applying. Institutions are encouraged to include information about their Dual Enrollment requirements for students from non-accredited home school programs or non-accredited high schools in their catalog and on their websites.

Institutions may have more restrictive requirements for high school juniors; however, establishing such higher requirements may not preclude high school juniors from participating in these programs.

The USG offers a residential Dual Enrollment option for gifted, talented, and motivated students through the Georgia Academy of Mathematics, Engineering, and Sciences at Middle Georgia State University. Admissions and program requirements are established by MGSU.

3.1.1.5 Transfer Requirements

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.1.5, TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS

A transfer applicant is any applicant seeking admission as a degree-seeking student and who has completed transferable coursework. Students with 30 or more transferable hours must meet transfer admission requirements. Students with fewer than 30 transferable semester credit hours are required to meet freshman admission requirements. Students who have completed 30 or more transferable hours, regardless of the date of high school graduation, may be admitted under transfer admission requirements. This includes students who have earned college credit through dual enrollment, early college, or examination (AP or IB).

Institutions must give priority consideration to students transferring from another USG institution who meet transfer standards higher than the USG policy standards. Transfer students must receive the same consideration as native students in determining program admissibility.

To receive priority consideration for transfer admission, students should meet the following criteria:

Sending InstitutionCredit HoursCriteria
All institutions except research universitiesStudents with 15-19 semester creditsMeet regular freshman admissions requirements
Minimum GPA of 2.0 in core curriculum at the sending institution
Research universitiesAssociate Degree or 60 semester credits in core curriculumMinimum GPA of 3.0

Students who have earned a career associate degree may apply for admission to a program leading to the baccalaureate degree according to the institution’s criteria for admission for the program. Students with an earned career associate degree will not be held to RHSC requirements.

Students completing non-transfer associate degrees (e.g., Associate of Applied Science, Associate of Science in various health areas, and Associate of Applied Technology) at regionally accredited institutions will be evaluated on an individual basis to determine their eligibility for admission.

3.1.1.6 International Transfer Requirements

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.1.6, INTERNATIONAL TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS

Students who are non-native speakers of English, who transfer from an institution of higher education outside the U.S. where English was not the language of instruction, are required to submit an English language proficiency exam score from one of the approved providers below along with their foreign credentials.

The minimum and recommended scores acceptable for admission:
ItemMinimum Score for Admission*Recommended Score for Admission
Internet TOEFL6979
Paper TOEFL (only accepted until October 2019)523550
IELTS66.5
Old SAT (administered prior to March 2016) Critical Reading section430 
New SAT (administered March 2016 or later) Reading test24 
ACT English17 
EIKENPre-1 
MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery)77 
Cambridge English Scale Score - which can be demonstrated in B2 First (First Certificate in English - FCE), C1 Advanced (Certificate in Advanced English - CAE) or C2 Proficiency (Certificate of Proficiency in English - CPE)169177
Cambridge International Examinations (CIE) IGCSE and “O” Level “English” exams“D” or Better 
UK GCSE “English” exam“C” or Better 
UK GCE A-Level “English” exam“C” or Better 
EdExcel International A-Levels and IGCSE English exams“D” or Better 
Pearson (PTE) Academic5358
Completion of an approved USG campus-based ESL program of study.Per USG approval. 
A waiver of the English proficiency requirement can be applied to students who have successfully completed academic instruction in English. Successful completion can be demonstrated by one of the following methods: 1) Proof of degree at the secondary or collegiate level either outside or inside the U.S. where English is the official language of academic instruction. 2) Proof of completion of the equivalent of English 1101 and/or 1102 with a grade of C or better in one or both courses, at an accredited U.S. institution.Per USG campus review. 

*Institutions and departmental programs within the institution may set higher minimum test scores for admission.

English and Math admissions criteria, including the SAT or ACT, and placement criteria are required for international students.

Institutions may develop procedures to determine whether there is a need for placement in Learning Support English and/or ESL courses for students who meet the minimum English Proficiency requirements. An academically admissible applicant with credentials from another country who meets the minimum English Proficiency requirements (as indicated by an approved method for determining English Proficiency described above), but could benefit from supplemental English language instruction may be admitted to a degree program on the condition that the student will receive the supplemental English language instruction in a System-approved program . If a student does not meet the minimum English Proficiency requirements (as indicated by an approved method for determining English Proficiency described above), then the student cannot be granted regular admission. If an institution has an approved English-as-a-Second Language program then the student can be referred to and admitted into that program*. Programs of English-as-a Second Language used under this provision must be approved by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer.

*Please note that for these cases for F-1 students, the English-as-a-Second Language program must be approved by the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) via an I-17. The I-20 for this type of case must be issued reflecting English Language Study.

3.1.1.7 Exceptions to Transfer Requirements

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.1.7, EXCEPTIONS TO TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS

Transfer applicants who do not meet USG requirements may be considered for admission under the Limited Admission provision. Institutions may admit up to 10% of all transfer students under this provision. The base of this percent is the number of unduplicated headcount new transfer students admitted over the previous fiscal year. This Limited Transfer Admission category is separate from the Freshman Limited Admissions category.

Transfer students admitted as Limited Admissions students, including Presidential Exceptions who have RHSC deficiencies documented from another USG institution, shall be required to satisfy those deficiencies by subject area in the same manner as defined for Limited Admission Freshmen.

3.1.1.8 Non-Traditional Requirements

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.1.8, NON TRADITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

In order to make the University System of Georgia more accessible to citizens who are not of traditional college-going age and to encourage a higher proportion of Georgians to benefit from life-long learning, institutions may admit as many non-traditional students as is appropriate based on institution mission, academic programs, and success in retaining and graduating non-traditional students.

Applicants who have been out of high school for at least five years are not required to submit SAT/ACT scores. However, in order to avoid additional testing, such applicants may submit SAT/ACT scores that are no older than seven years and which are at least 500 in both Verbal/Critical Reading and Mathematics or ACT scores of at least 21 on both English and Mathematics.

Non-Traditional Freshmen
The number of non-traditional freshmen an institution enrolls are not counted against the percent of Freshman Limited Admissions allowed each institution.

For students transferring from a Southern Association of College and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) accredited TCSG college, comparable scores from the TCSG college may be used according to guidelines issued by the USG Chief Academic Officer.

As an alternative, an institution may allow non-traditional freshmen who have within the past seven years posted SAT scores of at least 500 in both Critical Reading and Mathematics on an SAT administered prior to March 2016, or equivalent on the new SAT, or ACT scores of at least 21 on both English and Mathematics to exempt the placement test.

Non-traditional freshmen must hold a high school diploma from an accredited or approved high school as outlined in Section 3.1.1.1 or have a state-issued high school equivalency certificate or diploma earned through the successful completion of a high school equivalency test approved by the Board of Regents. The following high school equivalency tests are approved:

  • GED
  • HiSET
  • TASC

Students admitted as non-traditional are not subject to the RHSC requirements.

Students who were previously enrolled at a USG institution and who now can be considered as non-traditional are not subject to previous RHSC requirements.

Institutions may set additional criteria for non-traditional students.

Non-Traditional Transfers
The number of non-traditional transfers an institution enrolls will not be counted against the percent of Transfer Limited Admissions allowed each institution.

A non-traditional transfer student can be admitted, according to the institution’s policy, if his/her transfer GPA is below the transfer standard for the institution’s sector.

3.1.1.9 Persons Aged 62 or Over

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.1.9, PERSONS AGED 62 OR OVER

For information about eligibility rules for enrollment of persons 62 years of age or older in units of the USG, see BoR Policy 4.2.1.9, Persons Aged 62 or Over.


↑ Top

3.1.2 Admission Requirements for Undergraduate Programs Not Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree

(Last Modified April 3, 2019)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.2, ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS NOT LEADING TO THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

3.1.2.1 Admission to Career Programs

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.2.1, ADMISSION TO CAREER PROGRAMS

The following are the two types of admission to career programs:

  • Those with a Core-based general education component allowing more than 12 semester hours of Core Curriculum coursework.
  • Those with non-Core general education components allowing 12 or fewer semester hours of Core Curriculum coursework.
  1. Programs with More than 12 Semester Hours of Core Curriculum
    All applicants must have a high school diploma. At research, comprehensive and state universities and some state colleges, applicants must achieve the institutional sector’s Freshman Index (FI) for Limited Admission and must have the sector’s minimum SAT scores. Applicants are not held to RHSC requirements, and they will not be counted among the students in the Limited Admission category.

  2. Programs with 12 or Fewer Semester Hours of Core Curriculum
    Applicants must meet one of the following criteria:
    • Graduate from an accredited high school as specified in Section 3.2.1 with a minimum GPA of 1.8
    • Meet the beginning freshman RHSC criteria for the institutional sector
    • Possess a state-issued high school equivalency certificate or diploma as specified in Section 3.2.1, High School Graduation

For placement purposes, students admitted to career degree or certificate programs must be evaluated for Learning Support placement.

Comparable scores from Southern Association of Colleges Commission on College (SACSCOC) accredited institutions that are part of the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) may be used.

Students who do not meet or exceed the institution’s minimum criteria for placement in collegiate English or Mathematics will be required to enroll in Learning Support courses as follows:

  • For students who take courses that have Learning Support prerequisites, all Learning Support requirements for those courses must be met.
  • For students who do not take courses with Learning Support prerequisites, completion of Learning Support courses is not mandatory.

Students who meet the institution’s regular admission standards for programs leading to baccalaureate degrees are exempted from taking the CPE or COMPASS. Students may take only those Core Curriculum courses that are specified in their approved career program.

Students who have earned an Associate of Science (AS) degree in an allied health area or an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree may apply for admission to a program leading to the baccalaureate degree according to the institution’s criteria for admission. These students will not be held to RHSC requirements.

Students admitted in the career degree or certificate category or who have not completed a career degree may be considered for admission into a baccalaureate degree program if either of the following conditions is met:

  • The student meets the requirements for Regular or Limited Admission.
  • The student shows exceptional promise and is admitted as a Presidential Exception.

Students admitted in this category must fulfill all Learning Support and RHSC requirements.

3.1.2.2 Admission of Non-Degree Students

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.2.2, ADMISSION OF NON-DEGREE STUDENTS

3.1.2.3 Admission of Postbaccalaureate Students

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.2.3, ADMISSION OF POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENTS

Students who have earned the baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution may enroll as non-degree students in courses with no limitation on the number of undergraduate credit hours that can be earned.

Post baccalaureate students who are interested in staff development, Continuing Education Units (CEU), or professional learning units and who have not been admitted to the graduate school may enroll in courses for non-credit. However, such students must meet the prerequisites for the class.

3.1.2.4 Admission of Transient Students

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.2.4, ADMISSION OF TRANSIENT STUDENTS

Requirements for Transient Admission
A transient student is a student who is enrolled in one college or university and takes courses temporarily in another institution with the intention of transferring the course credit back to their home institution. Transient students are approved and admitted for one academic term at a time. Institutions may allow transient students to attend for consecutive terms but a new application and supporting documentation must be submitted for each term. Students seeking transient admission shall submit the following:

  • A completed application for admission to the institution to which transient admission is requested.
  • A permission letter or form from the registrar, department chair, advisor or other appropriate official from the applicant’s home institution. The letter must indicate the student has permission to enroll in the host institution for the term the student is applying.
  • Institutions may require transient applicants to submit an application fee. Institutions may set additional requirements for transient admission. Transient applicants must meet the immunization requirements for the institution to which they are applying. Transient admission does not guarantee course availability.

eCore and Transient Students
A student who is enrolled in one college or university not currently affiliated with eCore, and who wishes to take online general education course(s) provided through eCore shall receive eCore Transient status at the eCore administrative institution for enrollment in eCore courses only, acknowledging that:

  • An eCore Transient student must be in good academic standing not under suspension or exclusion from their home institution.
  • eCore Transient students who are eligible for financial assistance (grants, loans, HOPE scholarship, etc.) must make financial assistance arrangements with their “home” institution and will receive such aid through their home institution.

eCore courses, like any core curriculum course take at a USG institution, are fully transferable to the student’s home institution upon transfer to another USG institution.

3.1.2.5 Admission of Auditors

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.2.5, ADMISSION OF AUDITORS

Students who submit evidence of graduation from a high school as specified in Section 3.1.1.1, or have a state-issued high school equivalency certificate or diploma earned through the successful completion of an approved high school equivalency test may register for undergraduate classes as auditors. The following high school equivalency tests are approved:

  • GED
  • HiSET
  • TASC

Students registered as auditors shall be required to pay the regular tuition and fees for enrollment. As an auditor, the student earns no grade or credit for the course, however, the student is entitled to all of the consideration given to a credit student. A transcript documenting the student’s audit status is available upon request. Students who are admitted as auditors are not eligible to receive financial aid.

Under extraordinary circumstances, the president may waive the requirement of high school diploma or equivalent for auditors.


↑ Top

3.1.3 Additional Admission Requirements

(Last Modified April 5, 2019)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.3, ADDITIONAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

3.1.3.1 Institution Admission Requirements

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.3.1, INSTITUTION ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

3.1.3.2 Referral of Students to Other Institutions

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 4.2.3.2, REFERRAL OF STUDENTS TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS

Recognizing the differences in institutional missions and academic offerings, institutions should actively assist Georgia residents denied admission in finding another USG institution that appropriately match the applicants’ interests and credentials.

3.1.3.3 Right to Refuse Admissions

SOURCES:
BoR Policy 4.2.3.3 RIGHT TO REFUSE ADMISSIONS

3.1.3.4 Right to Limit Admissions

SOURCES:
BoR 4.2.3.4 RIGHT TO LIMIT ADMISSIONS


↑ Top