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Academic & Student Affairs Handbook

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.2, LEARNING SUPPORT PROGRAMS

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 10.0, INFORMATION, RECORDS, AND PUBLICATIONS

Each USG institution shall have an institutional catalog that provides, at a minimum, the following information:

  • General information about the institution, e.g., mission, accreditation, degrees and certificates offered
  • Admissions and enrollment
  • Registration and reentry
  • Academic resources
  • Policies and disclosures
  • Programs of study and required courses
  • Student services
  • Course descriptions
  • Administration and faculty
  • Graduation requirements

The catalog informs students of expectations. The institution has the right to change the catalog without notice to individual students. It is the student’s responsibility to keep apprised of current graduation requirements for a particular degree program.

2.3.1 Majors and Minors

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.1, CORE CURRICULUM
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.8.1, DEGREES,GENERAL

A record of all degrees offered by an individual institution shall be on file in the respective registrar’s office and shall be listed in the USG’s database of Degrees and Majors. A new degree, including external degrees, shall not be listed until it has been approved by the Board of Regents.

Major Programs

A baccalaureate degree must contain 120 semester hours (exclusive of physical education activity/basic health or orientation course hours that the institution may require).

A baccalaureate degree program must require at least 21 semester hours of upper division courses in the major field and at least 39 semester hours of upper division work overall.

All majors must be authorized by the Board of Regents.

Exceptions to degree semester hour requirements indicated above may be made only with approval of the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG

Minor Programs

A minor must contain 15 to 18 semester hours of coursework with at least 9 hours of upper-division coursework. Courses taken to satisfy Core Areas A through E may not be counted as coursework in the minor. Core Area F courses may be counted as coursework in the minor. University System institutions are required to notify the Office of Academic Programs when a new minor is established. Notification will be provided using the minor notification form (http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/changes/). Upon notification, minors will be listed on the Office of Academic Programs website. Changes in the name of a minor should also be sent to the Office of Academic Programs.


2.3.2 New Academic Programs

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.6.1, CREATION OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

New Degree Programs Overview

All proposals for new degree programs must be consistent with the college or university mission and must be high on the list of academic priorities as delineated in the institution’s strategic plan. It is expected that the institution will have already planned for redirected internal resources toward support of the proposed program before asking for new resources centrally. Program proposals requesting new state funding should be forwarded to the Chancellor as a part of the annual budget request, which will be the only time program proposals requiring new state funds will be accepted for review.

The Office of Academic Affairs in the University System Office will review new proposals using the guidelines at the following URL: http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/new_programs/.

2.3.2.1 Academic Program Forecast

Added: February 2011; Revised November 2014

An annual report should be forwarded electronically to the Office of Academic Planning presenting an academic program forecast of potential new programs. All programs included in the forecast should be consistent with the college or university mission and must be high on the list of academic priorities as delineated in the institution’s strategic plan. This forecast should only include programs the institution definitely plans to implement. Institutions are required to include new programs, existing programs if planning to evolve to an online teaching format that will exceed 50% online. Future online programs should also be included. New programs that are not part of the most current forecast may be forwarded to the BOR; however, submitting programs not included in the academic program forecast must be justified.

The academic program forecast should be forwarded by September 1st of each year to the Office of Academic Planning using the attached form.


2.3.3 Deactivation and Termination of Academic Programs

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.6.2, TERMINATION OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

When applied to educational programs, the terms “termination” and “discontinuation” refer to the same action. Termination means that the institution is no longer authorized to offer the program. Termination requires Board approval, and subsequent reinstatement must be handled as submission of a proposal for a new program.

When applied to educational programs, the terms “temporary suspension” and “deactivation,” refer to the same action. Presidents can temporarily suspend a program for a period not to exceed two academic years, without obtaining Board approval, and may subsequently reinstate the program within that period.

However, the President of the institution should advise the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG or the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs of such actions. If the suspension has not been (or will not be) lifted (i.e., the program has not been reactivated) by the end of the second academic year, the president should take action to terminate the program. The institution’s Office of Academic Affairs will submit a request to terminate an academic program with the following information:

  • Termination date to coincide with the a regularly scheduled Board meeting
  • Confirmation that no students are currently matriculating through the program or confirmation that any remaining students in the program have been appropriately advised and counseled concerning degree program options
  • Confirmation that termination of the program will not have an adverse impact on tenured and non-tenured faculty or students
  • Rationale for terminating the program
  • Length of time that the program was in a deactivated status, if at all, before requesting action to terminate

A suspended program remains an authorized program at the institution, but new students are no longer permitted to enroll. Suspended programs should not be listed in the college catalog but will remain in the Degrees and Majors inventory of the Board with a notation that they are on a deactivated status.

For details and forms related to the deactivation and termination process, see http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/changes/.


2.3.4 Program Modification

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 8.3.7.10, TERMINATION/LAYOFF OF TENURED PERSONNEL DUE TO PROGRAM MODIFICATION
BOARD MINUTES, 1/2008

Institutions that find themselves in programmatic decline as a result of a significant change in institutional mission or academic priorities, shall request a program modification from the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG or the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs. The President or Vice President of Academic Affairs shall include the following in the request:

  • List of programs that require permanent termination
  • List of impacted faculty, staff, and administrators
  • List of tenured faculty out of those impacted
  • Rationale for permanent reduction in programs
  • Request for in-depth study by academic staff
  • Request for report and timeline
  • Request to include outside evaluators with list of evaluators included
  • Request for action by the Board of Regents within the specified timetable
  • Analysis and impact statement on facilities and fiscal resources
  • Plan for student advisement with regard to other available academic programs
  • Plan for any current matriculants in programs slated for permanent termination
  • Plan for communications and notification to the campus community

For details and forms related to program modification, see http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/changes/.


2.3.5 Degree Requirements

Associate Degrees

An associate degree must include a minimum of 60 semester hours.

Associate of Arts and Associate of Science transfer degrees have a maximum of 60 semester hours (exclusive of physical education activity/basic health or orientation course hours that the institution may require).

Career degrees include the Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) and Associate of Science (A.S.) in allied health areas in designated fields. Career degrees may be awarded for the completion of two-year collegiate programs designed to prepare students for immediate employment. Associate of Applied Science degrees and Associate of Science career degrees in allied health and nursing have a maximum of 70 semester hours (exclusive of physical education activity/basic health or orientation course hours that the institution may require. These degrees must contain a minimum of 20 semester hours of general education.

Exceptions to the maximum degree length requirements indicated above may be made only with the approval of the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

Baccalaureate Degrees

A baccalaureate degree program must require at least 21 semester hours of upper division courses in the major field and at least 39 semester hours of upper division work overall.

Any changes above the 120 degree credit hour maximum must be presented in the form of a request for waiver to degree-credit hour length through the institution’s vice president for academic affairs with a rationale for such changes and a sketch of the existing and proposed curriculum. The rationale shall include references to external accrediting body requirements that exacerbate the need and requirement to increase credit hours in a program. Likewise, changes above the minimum requirement for associate and master’s degrees must be presented in the form of a request for waiver to degree-credit hour length with a rationale for such changes.

Master’s Degrees

Master’s degrees are established at a maximum of 36 semester hours. In some cases, the master’s degree may require fewer than 36 hours but not contain fewer than 30 semester hours.

To offer a program above the 36-semester hour maximum, a request must be made to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG for approval.


2.3.6 Comprehensive Program Review (CPR)

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.6.3, COMPREHENSIVE ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW
EFFECTIVE DATE: THIS POLICY AND ITS ACCOMPANYING PROCEDURES WERE DEVELOPED BY THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE ON INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS AND ENDORSED BY THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ON 7/18/ 2000. FURTHER REVISIONS TO COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM REVIEW (CPR) POLICIES WERE UNDERTAKEN BY THE TASK FORCE ON NEW AND COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM REVIEW IN A REPORT COMPLETED 1/2009.

The Comprehensive Program Review process is a campus-based program review with the University System Office serving in an oversight capacity to evaluate initial program review processes and conduct periodic audits. For information about institutional responsibilities and to view institutional program assessment plans, see http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/cpr/.

Comprehensive Academic Program Review

Each USG institution shall conduct academic program review on a periodic basis. Consistent with efforts in institutional effectiveness and strategic planning, each USG institution shall develop procedures to evaluate the effectiveness of its academic programs to address the quality, viability, and productivity of efforts in teaching and learning, scholarship, and service as appropriate to the institution’s mission. Institutional review of academic programs shall involve analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data, and institutions must demonstrate that they make judgments about the future of academic programs within a culture of evidence. Planning and conduct of academic program reviews shall be used for the progressive improvement and adjustment of programs in the context of the institution’s strategic plan and in response to findings and recommendations of the reviews. Adjustment may include program enhancement, maintenance at the current level, reduction in scope, or, if fully justified, consolidation or termination.

An institution’s cycle of review for all undergraduate academic programs shall be no longer than seven (7) years, and for all graduate programs no longer than ten (10) years. Newly approved programs should automatically be reviewed seven years after launch. If successfully reviewed, the new program will then become part of the regular institutional cycle. If unsuccessful, the institution will present a plan of action to the System Office. Programs accredited by external entities may not substitute an external review for institutional program review, but material submitted as part of an external accreditation process may be used in the institutional review. Institutions may align program review cycles with required external accreditation review, so long as no program review cycle at any level exceeds ten (10) years. Institutions must also review General Education every five (5) years; learning outcomes for each Area A-E of institutional core curricula must be approved by the Council on General Education. Institutions are also encouraged to review Learning Support programs.

Each USG institution shall provide a web link outlining institutional comprehensive program review procedures and shall post program review results on a password protected institutional web site, which shall include the institutional review cycle and a summary of current institutional reviews.

Academic Affairs staff will perform spot audits on the posted institutional comprehensive program reviews to ensure that reviews are being used to inform institutional decision-making on the issues of program quality, productivity and viability. The System Office staff will continue to provide data on programs with low enrollment for institutional information.


SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.1, CORE CURRICULUM
BOARD OF REGENTS MINUTES, 10/14/2009
EFFECTIVE DATE: ALL INSTITUTIONS WILL IMPLEMENT THIS POLICY NO LATER THAN FALL 2011 BUT MAY IMPLEMENT IT EARLIER. HOWEVER, IN ORDER TO ALLOW FOR CURRICULAR ALIGNMENT WITH FOUR-YEAR INSTITUTIONS, TWO-YEAR INSTITUTIONS MAY DELAY IMPLEMENTATION UNTIL FALL 2012. ALL INSTITUTIONS WILL IMPLEMENT THE OVERLAY REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS NEW TO THE SYSTEM EFFECTIVE FALL 2012.

2.4.1 General Education Learning Goals

The University System of Georgia (USG) is a composite of diverse institutions that, in spite of their diversity, require System-wide coherence to facilitate success for transfer students. To achieve these ends, the USG outlines general education learning goals that serve as guides for each institution to develop its own general education learning outcomes. Each institution is required to develop one or more learning outcomes for each learning goal. Instead of presenting the learning goals with descriptions or specific required outcomes, examples of learning outcomes that would fall under each learning goal are provided.

The learning outcomes for Goals A–E and Goals I–III developed by institutions must be approved by the Council on General Education. All learning outcomes must be collegiate level, not skills-based, and broadly focused. They must be consistent with the learning goals and with the mission of the USG.

The academic advisory committees will specify learning outcomes for each Area F. These learning outcomes must be collegiate level and provide an appropriate base for later learning outcomes in the relevant degree program. They must be consistent with the mission of the USG.

Per the USG Comprehensive Program Review Policy (BoR Policy 3.6.3, Comprehensive Academic Program Review), the assessment of general education learning outcomes is required at all institutions and must be a part of each institution’s regular report on comprehensive program review posted on the institution’s Comprehensive Program Review website. The Regents’ Administrative Committee on Effectiveness and Accreditation (RACEA) will conduct spot reviews of all institutional programs. SACS’ final recommendations and findings regarding the assessment of general education outcomes (if any) must also be sent to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Achievement.

Learning Goal A1: Communication Outcomes
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students produce well-organized communication that meets conventional standards of correctness, exhibits an appropriate style, and presents substantial material.
  • Students communicate effectively using appropriate writing conventions.
  • Students have the ability to assimilate, analyze, and present in oral and written forms, a body of information.
  • Students have the ability to adapt communication to circumstances and audience.
  • Students have the ability to interpret content of written materials on related topics from various disciplines.
  • Students demonstrate an understanding of what constitutes plagiarism and acknowledge the use of information sources.

Learning Goal A2: Quantitative Outcomes
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students have a strong foundation in mathematical concepts, processes, and structure.
  • Students effectively apply symbolic representations to model and solve problems.
  • Students have the ability to model situations from a variety of settings in generalized mathematical forms.
  • Students have the ability to express and manipulate mathematical information, concepts, and thoughts in verbal, numeric, graphical, and symbolic forms while solving a variety of problems.
  • Students have the ability to solve multiple-step problems through different (inductive, deductive, and symbolic) modes of reasoning.

Learning Goal B: Institutional Options
System institutions may develop additional learning goals (and their associated outcomes) that fit their respective missions.
Examples of possible additional goals include: collaboration, technology, ethics, civic responsibility and/or civic engagement, and service learning.

Learning Goal C: Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students can compare and contrast the meaning of major texts from both Western and non-Western cultures.
  • Students recognize themselves as participants in a particular culture and see how this affects their experiences and values.
  • Students have the ability to make informed judgments about art forms from various cultures including their own culture.
  • Students have the ability to recognize the fine arts as expressions of human experience.
  • Students have the ability to critically appreciate historical and contemporary fine art forms as they relate to individual and social needs and values.
  • Students have the ability to apply knowledge of historical, social, and cultural influences to understanding a work of art.
  • Students recognize that an ethical issue is present and can distinguish ethical choices from mere self-interest.
  • Students are aware of the ways that culture shapes ethical views and can critically evaluate those views.

Learning Goal D: Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Technology
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students have the ability to understand the physical universe and science’s relationship to it.
  • Students have the ability to understand the changing nature of science.

Learning Goal E: Social Sciences
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students have the ability to describe how historical, economic, political, social, and spatial relationships develop, persist, and change.
  • Students have the ability to articulate the complexity of human behavior as a function of the commonality and diversity within groups.

Learning Goal I: US Perspectives
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students understand the history of the U.S. and can see the effect of this history on contemporary culture.
  • Students understand the importance of cultural diversity in the U.S.
  • Students understand the constitutional principles and related political, social, and institutional developments and governmental processes fundamental to an understanding of American democracy and political participation, from colonial times to the present.

Learning Goal II: Global Perspectives
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students are engaged and informed global citizens, aware of global multicultural issues, and able to explain the differences among personal, social, political and economic decision-making processes at the state, federal and international levels of government.
  • Students effectively explore the place of the U.S. in the diverse realm of societies across the globe.
  • Students have communicative competence in a second language.
  • Students recognize individual and cultural differences across the globe and demonstrate an ability to communicate and interact effectively across cultures.

Learning Goal III: Critical Thinking
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students are active, independent, and self-directed thinkers and learners who apply thinking skills and innovation to solve problems.
  • Students confront ambiguous situations and go beyond traditional approaches to devise more useful and favorable solutions.
  • Students effectively identify, analyze, evaluate, and provide convincing reasons in support of conclusions.
  • Students have the ability to consider and accommodate opposing points of view.
  • Students have the ability to interpret inferences and develop subtleties of symbolic and indirect discourse.
  • Students have the ability to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.
  • Students have the ability to identify the audience, intent, value, and disciplinary perspective of potential sources of information.

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3, ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
BoR POLICY MANUAL 8, PERSONNEL
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.4.1, SEMESTER SYSTEM
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.4.2, UNIFORM ACADEMIC CALENDAR
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.4.3, RELIGIOUS HOLIDAY SCHEDULE
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.4.4, EXCEPTIONS
BoR POLICY MANUAL 8.2.6, HOLIDAYS

Procedures related to the Calendar of Academic Activities for USG institutions include the following information:

Semester System
Determination of specific days and times of course offerings is left to the discretion of the institution in order to provide for flexible scheduling within the parameters of BOR Policy 3.4.1

Uniform Academic Calendar
The starting and ending dates for each semester are determined by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG. The following link provides information concerning the earliest starting and latest ending dates by term for each institution: http://www.usg.edu/academics/calendars/.

Religious Holiday Schedule
Decisions as to which religious holidays are covered by institutional policy are left to the discretion of individual USG institutions since the characteristics of the student body and faculty may vary considerably among institutions. The intent and spirit of the policy should be honored by making special arrangements for individuals where such an action is deemed to be best for the institution as a whole.

Cancellation of Classes
If severe weather requires the cancellation of classes, “makeup” days shall be scheduled according to the academic calendar of the institution with sensitivity to institutionally established dates. Any rescheduling shall observe the institution’s policy on religious holidays.

Institutional Holidays
USG institutions shall have twelve official paid holidays each calendar year for employees. The paid holidays are in addition to earned vacation time. Terminated employees are not paid for official holidays or sick leave after the last working day of employment.

2.4.2 Areas A–F

Every institution in the USG will have a core curriculum of precisely 42 semester hours and an Area F of precisely 18 hours. All students must meet the core requirements of the institutions from which they receive their degrees. However, see the rules regarding transfer credit in Section 2.4.9, Transfer Rules.

Area Area Name Description Hours Required
A1 Communication Outcomes Courses that address learning outcomes in writing in English At least 6 hours
A2 Quantitative Outcomes Courses that address learning outcomes in quantitative reasoning At least 3 hours
B Institutional Options Courses that address general education learning outcomes of the institution’s choosing At least 3 hours
C Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics Courses that address learning outcomes in humanities, fine arts, and ethics At least 6 hours
D Natural Science, Mathematics, and Technology Courses that address learning outcomes in the natural sciences, mathematics, and technology. At least 7 hours. At least 4 of these hours must be in a lab science course.
E Social Sciences Courses that address learning outcomes in the social sciences At least 6 hours
F Lower-Division Major Requirements Lower division courses required by the degree program and courses that are prerequisites to major courses at higher levels. 18 hours

The minima for Areas D and E are lower than the hours required in these Areas in the 1998 core. This is not intended as a signal that institutions should reduce (or increase) the hours in these areas. The intent is to put this matter in the hands of the faculty of individual institutions by roughly requiring two courses in each of Areas C–E. See Section 2.4.4, for details regarding Area D.


2.4.3 US, GL, and CT Learning Goals

Each institution’s Areas A–E will include three additional requirements.

Areas US (US Perspectives) and GL (Global Perspectives) Learning Goals

Goal Description
US Perspectives Courses that address learning outcomes focused on the United States of America.
Global Perspectives Courses that address learning outcomes focused on countries other than the United States of America

Each institution will designate one or more courses in Areas A–E as US courses and one or more courses in Areas A–E as GL courses. No course may be both a US course and a GL course. As they are fulfilling the Area A–E requirements, every student must take at least one US course and at least one GL course.

Example: RELS 1234, Introduction to World Religions, is in Area C of the core at Decatur State University. It is designated a GL course. A student who takes RELS 1234 would satisfy the GL requirement and also earn hours toward the Area C requirement.

CT (Critical Thinking) Learning Goal
Each institution must have a core curriculum CT plan to ensure that students who complete Areas A–E attain learning outcomes regarding foundational critical thinking skills. Institutions are encouraged to be innovative in their CT plans.

Options include but are not limited to the following:

  • Designating a course or courses in Areas A–E as CT courses and requiring that as they are fulfilling the Area A–E requirements, every student must take at least one CT course.
  • Requiring students to develop a CT portfolio composed of materials from assignments in Area A–E courses. This portfolio would then be evaluated by designated faculty.
  • Requiring that students earn a particular score on a nationally recognized critical thinking test (e.g., the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, the Analytical Writing Section of the GRE General Test, the SAT Writing test).

All institutions will implement the overlay requirements for students new to the System effective fall 2012.


2.4.4 Details Regarding Areas A–F

All courses in Areas A–E must be taught at the collegiate level and be broadly focused. They must clearly address the general education learning outcomes of the institution. They must be consistent with the USG’s mission and strategic plan.

Area A1 Communication Skills
If offered, ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 must be placed in this area. Other approved courses may be placed in this area. See Section 2.4.6 for course approval rules.

Effective Fall 2010, for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2010, students who have earned 60 hours but have not completed Area A1 must enroll in the next course necessary to make progress toward completing this Area in every semester in which they take classes.

Effective Fall 2011, this hour limit is lowered to 45 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2011, Spring 2012, and Summer 2012.

Effective Fall 2012, the hour limit is lowered to 30 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2012 and thereafter.

Institutions are allowed to move to the 45/30 hour limits before they are required to do so. For students with Learning Support requirements in English, taking the required Learning Support course counts as making progress toward completing Area A1.

Area A2 Quantitative Skills
If offered, MATH 1111, MATH 1113 and either MATH 1001 or MATH 1101 must be placed in this area. MATH 1113 may also be placed in Area D. Other approved courses may be placed in this area. See Section 2.4.6 for course approval rules.

For students majoring in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, engineering technology, architecture, computer science, geology, geography (B.S.), forestry, pharmacy, physical therapy, secondary science, or mathematics education, pre-calculus must be the required mathematics course in Area A2 at all institutions. In this document, these majors are collectively referred to as “science programs.”

Institutions may require pre-calculus in Area A2 for majors in agricultural science and environmental science. While students may fulfill this requirement with a math course higher than pre-calculus, institutions may not require them to do so.

A calculus course is required in Area A2 for all engineering majors and for all programs at Georgia Institute of Technology. While students may fulfill this requirement with a math course higher than a first course in calculus, institutions may not require them to do so.

At institutions where trigonometry serves as an immediate prerequisite for Calculus I, the completion of trigonometry will be regarded as completion of pre-calculus in Area A2. Institutions do not need Council on General Education approval to add such trigonometry courses to Area A2, but the course catalog and the institution’s listing of Area A2 courses on the Academic Programs website (http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/information/core_curriculum_requirements_for_usg_colleges_and_universities/) should indicate that the trigonometry course in Area A2 meets the pre-calculus requirement.

Symbolic logic and math for liberal arts may not be used as substitutions for algebra or mathematical modeling in Area A2.

Institutions or programs may grant one semester hour of credit for an Area A2 course to count in Area F or in the general degree requirements.

Effective Fall 2010, for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2010, students who have earned 60 hours but have not completed Area A2 must enroll in the next course necessary to make progress toward completing this Area in every semester in which they take classes.

Effective Fall 2011, this hour limit is lowered to 45 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2011, Spring 2012, and Summer 2012.

Effective Fall 2012, freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2012 and thereafter, the hour limit is lowered to 30 hours.

Institutions are allowed to move to the 45/30 hour limits before required to do so. For students with Learning Support requirements in mathematics, taking the required Learning Support course counts as making progress toward completing Area A2.

Area B Institutional Options
These courses must include analytical, historical, critical and/or appreciative material.

Area C Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics
These courses must include analytical, historical, critical, and/or appreciative material.

Area D Natural Science, Mathematics, and Technology
These courses must be introductory and broadly focused. They must be analytic in nature and have a problem-solving component.

Science programs must require two four-hour laboratory science courses in Area D.

Science programs may specify a higher level math course in Area D.

Given the importance of natural science, mathematics, and technology, any institution that wishes to drop Area D below 10 hours must make a compelling intellectual case that its core proposal will not lead to students’ knowing less about the natural sciences, mathematics, and technology than under the current core.

An example of such a compelling case might be if the institution proposed to put 3 or more hours of math in Area B and 7 hours of natural science in Area D.

Institutions may have Area D requirements specific to all science programs, but no science program may require that students take a particular science in Area D. See the rules on prerequisites below.

For example, institutions may not require that chemistry majors complete Area D with chemistry courses.

Creative writing and technical communication courses may not be included in Area D.

Institutions or programs may grant one semester hour of credit for an Area D course to count in Area F or in the general degree requirements.

Students in the health professions, including nursing, must fulfill the Area D science requirement with a two-semester laboratory sequence in either physics, chemistry, or biology. The only biology courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are Introductory Biology (designed for non-science majors) and Principles of Biology (designed for science majors). The Survey of Chemistry sequence (CHEM 1151 and CHEM 1152) has been designed for the Area D health professions track. Health professions majors have the option of taking the Survey of Chemistry sequence or the sequence appropriate for science majors, but they may not fulfill their Area D requirements with chemistry courses designed for non-science majors.

Non-science majors may use the Survey of Chemistry sequence to fulfill the Area D requirements, but it may not be used to fulfill the science requirements for science majors not in the health professions.

Area E Social Sciences
These courses must include analytical, historical, critical and/or appreciative material. If course work is used to satisfy the U.S./Georgia history and constitutions requirements, these course(s) must be part of Area E.

Area F Lower-Division Major Requirements
This area must be composed exclusively of 1000/2000 level courses. These courses may be prerequisites for other Area F courses and/or for major courses at higher levels.


2.4.5 Rules Regarding Inclusion in Areas A–F

Every institution must offer a path to completing all Area A–E requirements composed exclusively of 1000 and 2000 level courses. Other approved 3000 and 4000 level courses may also be placed in Areas A–E. See Section 2.4.6 for course approval rules.

Physical education activity/basic health requirements may not be placed in Areas A–F. Up to four hours of physical education activity/basic health courses may be required outside of Areas A–F in excess of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees. Offerings in physical education/health in excess of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees must be limited to activity, basic health information, first aid, CPR, and safety courses. Transferring students taking physical education/basic health hours at one institution may not be required to duplicate these hours at the receiving institution.

Orientation courses may not be placed in Areas A–F. Up to four hours of orientation courses may be required outside of Areas A–F in excess of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees. Transferring students taking orientation hours at one institution may be required to take additional orientation hours (outside the maximum hours indicated for the undergraduate degree) at the receiving institution.

Courses with a primary emphasis on studio, performance, field study, or internship may not be placed in Areas A–E.

Institutions may decide that the first course in a foreign language falls outside of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees and/or outside of Areas A–F. Institutions that decide that the first course in a foreign language falls outside of the maximum number of hours are not required to grant transfer credit for such courses but may do so if they wish.

Courses in Areas A–F may not carry a fraction of a semester hour of credit.

Institutions may not permit the completion of any course to fulfill requirements in more than one Area A–F. Where the same course is authorized in more than one Area A–F, the student completing the course to meet the requirements of one area must take another course in the second area to meet the requirements of the second area.


2.4.6 Approval Procedures

Each institution will first submit the courses proposed for Areas A–E to the relevant Academic Advisory Committee and then to the Council on General Education. US/GL/CT courses and plans must be approved by the Council on General Education.

The courses in Area F must be approved by the relevant Academic Advisory Committee.

Courses previously approved for use in Area A–F at an institution do not require re-approval for use at that institution.


2.4.7 Prerequisites and Exceptions

Courses in one area (A–E) may be prerequisites for other courses in that area.

Except as noted below,

  • No course in Area A–E may be a prerequisite for any course outside Areas A–E
  • No course in one area (A–E) may be a prerequisite for any course in any other area (A–E).

Exception 1
If one particular course is required in order to complete an Area, that course may be a prerequisite for a course in another Area or for a course outside of Area A–E.

Exception 2
Degree programs may add courses in Areas A–E to their Area Fs. Students in such degree programs will receive credit for the course in Area F, and this course may be a prerequisite for courses in Area F or the major.

Exception 3
Institutions may require their students to complete their A2 requirements before taking math courses in Areas D and F. They may do so by making their A2 courses prerequisites for their math courses in Areas D and F.

Exception 4
A course that, according to an institution’s 2008–2009 catalog, appears in Area A–E (but not in Area F) and is a prerequisite for a course outside of Area A–E may remain a prerequisite for that course and remain in the core.

Exception 5
Institutions may apply for permission to specify that students in one or more of their degree programs are required to take particular courses within Areas A–E. Institutions may apply for up to 9 hours of such requirements. If permission is granted, these courses may be prerequisites for courses in Area F or in the major’s degree requirements.

Applications will be considered first by the relevant Academic Advisory Committees (the advisory committee for the degree program and the advisory committee for course), then by the Regents’ Administrative Committee on Academic Affairs (RACAA), then by the Council on General Education (Gen Ed Council). The Gen Ed Council will make a recommendation to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

Applications will be considered only if requiring particular courses in Areas A–E will allow the degree program to reduce the number of hours required for the degree.

In evaluating such requests RACAA and the Gen Ed Council will consider the following criteria:

  • The degree program is in an area in which demand for graduates in Georgia significantly outstrips the supply,
  • The degree program requires a special admission process beyond that required for admission to the institution,
  • The degree program has an accreditation body that requires so many hours it is difficult to design a degree program that is 120 hours without requiring particular courses in Areas A–E, and
  • Graduates of the degree program must pass a certification or licensure exam before they can exercise the relevant profession.

The courses required in Areas A–E must be available to and count in Areas A–E for all students, not just those in the degree program.

Some Examples:

  • PHIL 2010 is in Area C at Winder State. It is one of many courses in Area C and is not required in the philosophy Area F and is a prerequisite for upper-level philosophy courses. This is not allowed.
  • PHIL 2010 is in Area C at Decatur State. It is also required in the philosophy Area F and is a prerequisite for upper-level philosophy courses. Philosophy majors receive credit for PHIL 2010 in Area F and must take other courses to fulfill their Area C requirements. This is allowed.
  • Moultrie State requires ENGL 1101 and 1102 in Area A1. ENGL 1101 is a prerequisite for ENGL 1102. This is allowed.
  • Jesup State requires all students to take ENGL 1102 in Area A1. ENGL 1102 is a prerequisite for ENGL 2110 and ENGL 2110 is in Area C. This is allowed.
  • Seneca State requires nine hours in Area A1—ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, and one of the following four courses: ENGL 1105, Writing in the Humanities, ENGL 1106, Writing in the Fine Arts, ENGL 1107, Writing in the Natural Sciences, ENGL 1108, Writing in the Social Sciences. ENGL 1105 is a prerequisite for PHIL 2010 in Area C. This is not allowed.
  • Seneca State’s nursing program wants to move from 123 to 120 hours. To do so, they propose to require all nursing students to take a new course, PSYCH 1234, in Area E. PSYCH 1234 is approved for use in the core according to the procedures noted in Exception 5 and counts towards Area E for all students. This is allowed.

2.4.8 Rules for Change of Major

Students switching from a non-science major to a science major must meet the Area A2 and Area D requirements for science majors even if they have already completed the Area A2 and Area D requirements for non-science majors.


2.4.9 Transfer Rules

Students in the USG must declare one home institution at a time. Students who transfer from one institution to another automatically change their home institution.

Students must meet the USG-specified minimum number of hours in each Area A–E.

Students successfully completing a course in one institution’s Areas A–E will receive full credit in Areas A–E for the course upon transfer to another USG institution as long as the following conditions are met:

  • The course is within the Area hours limitations of either the sending institution or the receiving institution and
  • The student does not change from a non-science major to a science major

An Example to Illustrate Cross-Area Transfer Credit

Decatur State Winder State Moultrie State
Area A1 6 hours 6 hours 6 hours
Area A2 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours
Area B 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours
Area C 12 hours 9 hours 9 hours
Area D 9 hours 12 hours 9 hours
Area E 9 hours 9 hours 12 hours
Total 42 hours 42 hours 42 hours

A student transferring from Decatur State to Winder State having completed the Decatur State core must be given credit in Area D (Natural Science) for the 3 excess hours of work done in Area C (Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics). If a student took 12 hours of Area E (Social Science) courses at Decatur State, only nine of those hours would transfer to Winder State but all 12 would transfer to Moultrie State.

Students successfully completing a course in one institution’s Area F will receive full credit for the course upon transferring to another USG institution as long as the student retains the same major.

Students who transfer after having completed the US/GL/CT requirements of the sending institution may not be required to complete the US/GL/CT requirements of the receiving institution. Students who transfer after having completed Areas A–E but without having completed the US/GL/CT requirements must complete the US/GL/CT requirements at the receiving institution.

Receiving institutions may require transfer students to complete the requirements as specified for native students. However, the total number of hours required of transfer students for the degree must not exceed the number of hours required of native students for the same major.

Students who wish to take Area A–F courses (including distance learning courses) from a USG institution other than the home institution, either concurrently or intermittently, may receive transient permission to take and receive credit for Areas A–F courses satisfying home institution Area A–F requirements.

Provided that native and transfer students are treated equally, institutions may impose additional reasonable expectations, such as a grade of “C” in Area A–F courses.

Chief Transfer Officer
Each institution will designate a Chief Transfer Officer (CTO) to facilitate the transfer of students within the USG. The CTO must have senior administrative and/or faculty status. The CTO is the contact person for students, faculty, advisors, records and admissions personnel, and academic administrators when problems related to transfer of Area A–F course work across USG institutions occur. However, CTOs should also be proactive and work to develop institutional procedures that minimize transfer problems.

Students with questions or concerns about the transfer of credit between USG institutions should contact the CTO at the receiving institution.


2.4.10 Common Course Prefixes, Numbers, and Descriptions

SOURCES:
MEMORANDA FROM SENIOR VICE CHANCELLOR FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS, 5/2/1997; 5/23/1997; 6/3/1997; 6/30/1997; AND 11/19/1997 (APPROVED 6/1/1997, FOR IMPLEMENTATION WITH SEMESTER CONVERSION)

Following are common course prefixes, numbers, and descriptions that all institutions shall use for their programs of study.

Course Prefix and NumberCourse NameCourse Description
ACCT 2101Principles of Account IA study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts.
ACCT 2102Principles of Accounting IIA study of the underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts.
ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology  
ANTH 1103 Introduction to Social Anthropology  
ANTH 1104 Introduction to Archaeology  
ANTH 1105 Introduction to Physical Anthropology  
ANTH 1106 Introduction to Cultural Diversity  
ART See Fine and Applied Arts  
ASTR 1000 Introduction to the UniverseA survey of the universe, examining the historical origins of astronomy; the motions and physical properties of the Sun, Moon, and planets; the formation, evolution, and death of stars; and the structure of galaxies and the expansion of the universe.
ASTR 1010 Astronomy of the Solar SystemAstronomy from early ideas of the cosmos to modern observational techniques. The solar system planets, satellites, and minor bodies. The origin and evolution of the solar system.
ASTR 1020 Stellar and Galactic AstronomyThe study of the Sun and stars, their physical properties and evolution, interstellar matter, star clusters, our galaxy and other galaxies, and the origin and evolution of the Universe.
BiologyFor science courses in biology, chemistry, and physics, the sequences designed for non-science majors will be entitled “Introductory Biology, Introductory Chemistry, and Introductory Physics.”
The sequences designed for science majors will be entitled “Principles of Biology, Principles of Chemistry, and Principles of Physics.”
Combined lecture/lab courses should be indicated with a “K” suffix, and stand-alone lab courses should be indicated with an “L” suffix. The approved course descriptions shown for chemistry illustrate the use of the suffixes.
The Principles of Biology sequence will be numbered BIOL 1107 and 1108 (or BIOL 2107 and 2108 for institutions offering the courses in the second year).
BUSA 1105 Introduction to Business An integrative study of the functional areas of business (finance, operations, marketing, human resources, etc.)
BUSA 2105 Communicating in the Business Environment A course emphasizing both interpersonal and organizational communications; to include written and oral exercises appropriate to business practice.
BUSA 2106 The Environment of Business An introduction to the legal, regulatory, political, social, ethical, cultural environmental and technological issues which form the context for business; to include an overview of the impact and demographic diversity on organizations.
Chemistry For science courses in biology, chemistry, and physics, the sequences designed for non-science majors will be entitled “Introductory Biology, Introductory Chemistry, and Introductory Physics.”
The sequences designed for science majors will be entitled “Principles of Biology, Principles of Chemistry, and Principles of Physics.”
Combined lecture/lab courses should be indicated with a “K” suffix, and stand-alone lab courses should be indicated with an “L” suffix.
CHEM 1100 Introductory Chemistry A one-semester course covering basic concepts and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. There is no laboratory component.
CHEM 1101K Introductory Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. Topics to be covered include atomic structure and isotopes, periodicity and chemical equations. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1102K Introductory Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1101 Introductory Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. Topics to be covered include atomic structure and isotopes, periodicity and chemical equations.
CHEM 1101L Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1101.
CHEM 1102 Introductory Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors.
CHEM 1102L Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1102.
CHEM 1151K Survey of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Topics to be covered include elements and compounds, chemical equations, nomenclature, and molecular geometry. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1152K Survey of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1151 Survey of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Topics to be covered include elements and compounds, chemical equations, nomenclature, and molecular geometry.
CHEM 1151L Survey of Chemistry Laboratory I Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1151.
CHEM 1152 Survey of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors.
CHEM 1152L Survey of Chemistry Laboratory II Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1152.
CHEM 1211K Principles of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1212KPrinciples of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature.
CHEM 1211L Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1211.
CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors.
CHEM 1212L Principles of Chemistry Laboratory II Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1212.
COM See Fine and Applied Arts
CSCI 1301 Computer Science I The course includes an overview of computers and programming; problem solving and algorithm development; simple data types; arithmetic and logic operators; selection structures; repetition structures; text files; arrays (one-and-two-dimensional); procedural abstraction and software design; modular programming (including subprograms or the equivalent).
CSCI 1302 Computer Science II The course includes an overview of abstract data types (ADTs); arrays (multi-dimensional) and records; sets and strings; binary files; searching and sorting; introductory algorithm analysis (including Big-O); recursion; pointers and linked lists; software engineering concepts; dynamic data structures (stacks, queues, trees).
ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies.
ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze structure and performance of the market economy.
ENGL 1101 English Composition I A composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills.
ENGL 1102 English Composition II A composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101, that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods.
ENGL 2110 World Literature (one course only) A survey of important works of world literature.
ENGL 2111 World Literature I (as part of a two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid-seventeenth century.
ENGL 2112 World Literature II (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of world literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present.
ENGL 2120 British Literature (one course only) A survey of important works of British literature.
ENGL 2121 British Literature I (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of British literature from the Old English period through the neoclassical age.
ENGL 2122 British Literature II (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of British literature from the Romantic era to the present.
ENGL 2130 American Literature (one course only) A survey of important works of American literature.
ENGL 2131 American Literature I (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of American literature from the pre colonial age to the mid-nineteenth century.
ENGL 2132 American Literature II (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of American literature from the mid nineteenth century to the present.
Course Prefix and NumberCourse NameCourse Description
Fine and Applied Arts
ART The Visual Art Common Prefix for Area C and Area F courses is ART (with the fourth letter being an institutional prerogative).
ART 1010 Drawing I Introduction to the techniques, materials and principles of drawing.
ART 1011 Drawing II Techniques, materials and principles of drawing.
ART 1020 Two Dimensional Design The fundamentals of two dimensional design introduced through projects in a variety of media.
ART 1030 Three Dimensional Design An investigation of three dimensional forms and space using various materials and methods.
COMM 1100 Human Communications A broad approach to oral communications skills including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and public speaking
COMM 1110 Public Speaking The organization of materials and the vocal and physical aspects of delivery in various speaking situations.
MUSC 1100 Music Appreciation (or equivalent) Introduction to Music History and literature.
MUSC 1080 or 2080 Band (or equivalent) Study, rehearsal, and concert performance or literature for band.
MUSC 1090 or 2090 Choir (or equivalent) Study, rehearsal, and concert performance of literature for choir.
THEA 1100 Theatre Appreciation Survey and critical appreciation of Theatre.
Foreign Language Courses
____ 1001 1st semester elementary course (This course will not meet degree requirements at some USG institutions.)
____ 1002 2nd semester elementary course
____ 2001 1st semester intermediate course
____ 2002 2nd semester intermediate course
FREN 1001 Elementary French I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French and to the culture of French-speaking regions.
FREN 1002 Elementary French II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in French with further study of the culture of French-speaking regions.
GREK 1001 Elementary Greek Introduction to the grammar, reading, and translation of Classical Attic Greek.
GREK 1002 Elementary Greek II Continued study of the grammar of Classical Attic Greek begun in GREK 1001, with further reading and translation.
GRMN 1001 Elementary German I An introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Beginning of a survey of basic German grammar and the grammar and the development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Some aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. [INSTITUTIONAL OPTION: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.]
GRMN 1002 Elementary German II The second part of an introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Completion of the survey of basic German grammar and further development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. [INSTITUTIONAL OPTION: Work with other media(audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.]
ITAL 1001 Elementary Italian I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing in Italian and to the culture of Italian-speaking regions.
ITAL 1002 Elementary Italian II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in Italian with further study of the culture of Italian-speaking regions.
LATN 1001 Elementary Latin I Introduction to the Latin language: pronunciation, fundamentals of grammar, reading, and translation.
LATN 1002 Elementary Latin II Continued study of Latin grammar and syntax begun in LATN 1001, with further reading and translation.
PORT 1001 Elementary Portuguese I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing Portuguese and to the culture of Portuguese-speaking regions.
PORT 1002 Elementary Portuguese II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in Portuguese with further study of the culture of Portuguese-speaking regions.
SPAN 1001 Elementary Spanish I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish and to the culture of Spanish-speaking regions.
SPAN 1002 Elementary Spanish II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish with further study of the culture of Spanish-speaking regions.
Other Foreign Language Prefixes
ARAB Arabic
CHIN Chinese
FARS Farsi
HEBR Hebrew
JAPN Japanese
NORW Norwegian
RUSS Russian
YORU Yoruba
Geography
GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography A survey of global patterns of resources, population, culture, and economic systems. Emphasis is placed upon the factors contributing to these patterns and the distinctions between the technologically advanced and less advanced regions of the world.
GEOG 1103 Geographic Perspectives on Multiculturalism in the U.S. Geographic factors underlying multiculturalism and ethnic relationships in the United States. Three interrelated themes are emphasized: the spatial development and organization of culture; population growth, migration, and urbanization; and the spatial dimensions of political, economic, and social processes.
GEOG 1111 Introduction to Physical Geography (Earth Science Survey) An introduction to physical geography, surveying climate, vegetation, soils, landforms, and water resources in their areal interrelations and distributions.
GEOG 1112 Introduction to Weather and Climate
(3 credits lecture, 1 credit for optional lab, or 4 credits if combined)
Components of weather processes, and their measurement. Climatic elements and their control factors. Geographic classification of climatic and vegetative types on the Earth’s surface.
GEOG 1113 Introduction to Landforms (3 credits lecture, 1 credit for optional lab, or 4 credits if combined) Introductory analysis and classification of major types of land surfaces, stressing geographic characteristics. Study and interpretation of relationships between landforms and other phenomena through maps, air photos, and field observations. World coverage with stress on North America.
GEOG 1125 Resources, Society, and the Environment Interactions between physical systems and human activities, and their effects on environmental quality and sustainability are emphasized. Topics include: geography of population and resource consumption, food production, water and air quality, energy policy, land/biotic resource management. Contrasting social, ethical, and technological perspectives on environmental concerns are explored.
GEOL 1121 Introductory Geosciences I (institutional option name, such as Physical Geology) This course covers Earth materials and processes.
GEOL 1122 Introductory Geosciences II (institutional option name, such as Historical Geology) This course covers geologic time, sedimentary environments, fossils, and Earth history.
History The numbers and content of history courses depend on whether the courses are taught as one, two, or three-semester versions.
Survey of World History/Civilization (One-semester version)
HIST 1100 A thematic survey of World History to the present era.
Survey of World History/Civilization (Two-semester version)
HIST 1111 A survey of World History to early modern times.
HIST 1112 A survey of World History from early modern times to the present.
Survey of World History/Civilization (Three-semester version)
HIST 1011 A survey of World History to the post-classical period.
HIST 1012 A survey of World History from the post-classical to early modern times.
HIST 1013 A survey of World History from early modern times to the present.
Survey of Western Civilization (One-semester version)
HIST 1120 A thematic survey of Western Civilization to the present.
Survey of Western Civilization (Two-semester version)
HIST 1121 A survey of Western Civilization to early modern times.
HIST 1122 A survey of Western Civilization from early modern times to the present.
Survey of Western Civilization (Three-semester version)
HIST 1021 A survey of Western Civilization to the medieval period.
HIST 1022 A survey of Western Civilization from medieval to early modern times.
HIST 1023 A survey of Western Civilization from early modern times to the present.
Survey of U.S. History (One-semester version)
HIST 2110 A thematic survey of U.S. History to the present.
Survey of U.S. History (Two-semester version)
HIST 2111 A survey of U.S. History to the post-Civil War period.
HIST 2112 A survey of U.S. History from the post-Civil War period to the present.
Learning Support Courses
Learning Support courses with numbers ranging from 0096 to 0099 should not be offered after summer of 2015. Reading will not be offered as a separate course after summer of 2015. No later than fall of 2015, all Learning Support courses will have numbers in the 0987 to 0999 range and will match the descriptions listed below.
English
ENGL 0989 Foundations for English Composition This is the first course in a year-long pathway leading to ENGL 0999 and ENGL 1101 in the second semester.
ENGL 0999 Support for English Composition This course is intended to provide corequisite support for students requiring remediation in English or reading while they are enrolled in ENGL 1101 – English Composition I
Mathematics
MATH 0987 Foundations for Quantitative Reasoning This is the first course in a year-long pathway leading to MATH 0997 and MATH 1001 in the second semester.
MATH 0988 Foundations for Mathematical Modeling This is the first course in a year-long pathway leading to MATH 0998 and MATH 1101 in the second semester.
MATH 0989 Foundations for College Algebra This is the first course in a year-long pathway leading to MATH 0999 and MATH 1111 in the second semester.
MATH0997 Support for Quantitative Reasoning This course is intended to provide corequisite support for students requiring remediation in mathematics while they are enrolled in MATH 1001 – Quantitative Reasoning
MATH 0998 Support for Mathematical Modeling This course is intended to provide corequisite support for students requiring remediation in mathematics while they are enrolled in MATH 1101 – Introduction to Mathematical Modeling
MATH0999 Support for College Algebra TThis course is intended to provide corequisite support for students requiring remediation in mathematics while they are enrolled in MATH 1111 – College Algebra
Learning Support courses NOT to be offered after Summer 2015
English
ENGL 0096 Non exit level course
ENGL 0097 Non exit level course
ENGL 0098 Second exit level course (if applicable)
ENGL 0099 Exit level
Mathematics
MATH0096 Non exit level course
MATH 0097 Non exit level course
MATH 0098 Second exit level course (if applicable)
MATH 0099 Exit level course
Reading
READ 0096 Non exit level course
READ 0097 Non exit level course
READ 0098 Second exit level course (if applicable)
READ 0099 Exit level course
Course Prefix and NumberCourse NameCourse Description
MATH 1001 Quantitative Reasoning This course emphasizes quantitative reasoning skills needed for informed citizens to understand the world around them. Topics include logic, basic probability, data analysis and modeling from data.
MATH 1101 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling This course is an introduction to mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. Emphasis is on the use of elementary functions to investigate and analyze applied problems and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communication of quantitative concepts and results.
MATH 1111 College Algebra This course provides an in-depth study of the properties of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions as needed for calculus. Emphasis is on using algebraic and graphical techniques for solving problems involving linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions.
MATH 1113 Pre-calculus This course is an intensive study of the basic functions needed for the study of calculus. Topics include algebraic, functional, and graphical techniques for solving problems with algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their inverses.
MUSC See Fine and Applied Arts.
PHIL 1010 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 2 credit-hour critical thinking courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2010 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit introduction to philosophy courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2020 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hours critical thinking courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2030 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hour introduction to ethics courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2040 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hour introduction to philosophy of art courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2500 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hour symbolic logic courses. Specific course description not specified.
Physics For science courses in biology, chemistry, and physics, the sequences designed for non-science majors will be entitled “Introductory Biology, Introductory Chemistry, and Introductory Physics.”
The sequences designed for science majors will be entitled “Principles of Biology, Principles of Chemistry, and Principles of Physics”.
Combined lecture/lab courses should be indicated with a “K” suffix, and stand-alone lab courses should be indicated with an “L” suffix. The approved course descriptions shown for chemistry illustrate the use of the suffixes.
PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I An introductory course which will include material from mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used.
PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II An introductory course which will include material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics, Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used.
PHYS 1211 or 2211 Principles of Physics I An introductory course which will include material from mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. Elementary differential calculus will be used.
PHYS 1212 or 2212 Principles of Physics II (level 1 or 2 to be specified by institution) An introductory course which will include material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. Elementary differential and integral calculus will be used.
PHSC or PHYS 1011 Physical Science I PHSC or PHYS is the recommended prefix for common physical science courses that are developed. To date, there are no common physical science courses.
PHSC or PHYS 1012 Physical Science II
POLS 1101 American Government
POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science
POLS 2201 State and Local Government
POLS 2301 Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLS 2401 Global Issues
POLS 2501 Domestic Issues
POLS 2601 Introduction to Public Administration
PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology (Institutional option for name addendum - e.g. Principles I) A broad survey of the major topics in psychology including, but not limited to, research methodology, biological and social factors influencing behavior, development, learning, memory, personality, and abnormal.
PSYC 2101 Introduction to the Psychology of Adjustment (Institutional option for name addendum) An introductory examination of the applied psychological theory and research concerning mental health and well being.
PSYC 2103 Introduction to Human Development (Institutional option for name addendum) An introductory, non-laboratory based examination of human development across the lifespan with an emphasis on normal patterns of physical, cognitive, and social development.
Regents Test Remediation courses
RGTE 0199 Essay
RGTR 0198 Reading
Other Regents Test courses
RGTE 0197 Essay
RGTR 0196 Reading
SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology A survey of the discipline of sociology. Topics will include sociological theory, methods and selected substantive area.
SOCI 1160 Introduction to Social Problems A theoretical and empirical analysis of selected major social problems confronting American society.
SOCI 2293 Introduction to Marriage and Family An introduction to the structure, processes, problems and adjustments of contemporary marriage and family life.

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.5, GRADING SYSTEM

The BoR Policy Manual identifies official grades approved for use by institutions.

2.5.1 Academic Renewal

Last reviewed: January 2010

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 3.5.1, ACADEMIC RENEWAL
EFFECTIVE DATE: JUNE 1995, UPDATED 5/24/2000

Definition of Terms for the Purpose of These Procedures

Suspension: A temporary separation from an institution. A suspension may be for (a) a specified period of time or (b) indefinite. Upon expiration of the specified period of suspension, the student is eligible to re-enroll. A student under indefinite suspension must petition for reinstatement to the president of the institution.

Dismissal: A permanent separation of the student from the institution. A student who is dismissed is not eligible to return to the institution.

Procedures The following procedures should be applied for students seeking Academic Renewal:

  1. Applying for Academic Renewal Status
    1. Students are encouraged to apply for Academic Renewal status at the time of re-enrollment or enrollment as a transfer student at a USG institution. Students who do not request Academic Renewal status at that time must do so within an established period of time determined by the institution not to be less than one calendar year after enrollment.
    2. Each USG institution shall establish specific evaluative criteria and procedures for application evaluation, approval, denial and re-application for Academic Renewal.
    3. Each institution will establish a process to determine if a student is ready to return.
    4. Institutions can determine if Academic Renewal status can be requested as part of the readmission process or after enrollment.
    5. A student can be granted Academic Renewal Status only one time.
  2. All previously attempted coursework continues to be recorded on the student’s official transcript.
    1. A Renewal GPA is begun when the student resumes taking coursework following approval for Academic Renewal.
    2. The Academic Renewal GPA will be used for determining academic standing and eligibility for graduation.
      1. To earn a degree from the institution granting Academic Renewal, a student must meet the institution’s residency requirements (the number of credit hours that must be earned at the degree awarding institution) after acquiring Academic Renewal status
      2. Institutions will determine the eligibility for honors at graduation for those students granted Academic Renewal status based on their institution policies regarding honor graduation.
    3. Academic credit for previously completed coursework, including transfer coursework, will be retained only for courses in which a grade of A, B or C has been earned.
      1. Retained grades are not calculated in a Renewal GPA. Such credit is considered in the same context as transfer credit, credit by examination, and courses with grades of “S.”
      2. Courses with grades of D or F must be repeated at the Academic Renewal institution if they are required in the student’s degree program.
      3. Applicability of retained credit to degree requirements will be determined by the degree requirements in effect at the time Academic Renewal status is conferred on the student. Specific institutional program regulations must also be met.
      4. Institutions shall accept transient credits of students with Academic Renewal status per their policies regarding the acceptance of such credit.
  3. Undergraduate students who are transferring to a USG institution or are returning to a USG institution after a period of absence may be eligible for Academic Renewal.
    1. Readmitted Students
      1. USG undergraduate students who return to their home institution may be eligible for Academic Renewal for coursework taken prior to the period of absence.
        1. Students must be absent from the USG institution for a minimum period of time to be determined by the institution but that is no less than three (3) years and no longer than five (5) years.
        2. Transfer credit for any coursework taken during the period of absence should be granted according to the institution’s policies regarding transfer credits.
    2. Transfer Students
      1. Students who leave a regionally-accredited institution of higher education and transfer to a USG institution may be eligible for Academic Renewal for coursework taken prior to a period of time equal to the period of absence required for Academic Renewal eligibility for readmitted students (which is no less than three (3) years and no longer than five (5) years).
        1. Only coursework completed prior to the eligibility window can be considered for Academic Renewal
        2. The period of eligibility is calculated from the date of enrollment at the USG institution.
        3. Courses taken more recently than the period of eligibility are ineligible for consideration for Academic Renewal. However, transfer credit can be granted for coursework taken during this period according to the institution’s policies regarding transfer credits.
  4. Any scholastic suspensions that occurred in the past shall remain recorded on the student’s permanent record. If a suspension (either first or second) is on the record and the student encounters subsequent academic difficulty after having been granted Academic Renewal, the next suspension subjects the student to dismissal.

  5. The Renewal GPA begins with the semester following re-enrollment.

  6. Re-entry into any program is not automatic.

  7. The granting of Academic Renewal does not supersede financial aid policies regarding Satisfactory Academic Progress.

  8. The granting of Academic Renewal does not supersede the admissions requirements of certain programs, e.g., teacher education and nursing, which require a specific minimum grade point average based upon all coursework.

  9. Academic Renewal status granted by one USG institution shall be honored at all other USG institutions.


2.5.2 Withdrawal for Military Service:  Refunds and Grades

Last reviewed: January 2010

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 7.3.5.3, MILITARY SERVICE REFUNDS

The following administrative guidelines are established for implementation of this action:

  • Students must officially withdraw and present official orders to qualify for refunds of tuition and fees.
  • Elective fees are pro rated according to the date that the student officially withdraws.
  • A student who withdraws and receives a full tuition refund will receive a grade of “WM,” military withdrawal, for all courses. A grade of WM entails no penalties that would ordinarily apply for federal or state aid. For example, the student does not have to pay back money already spent for books and fees, and a WM does not count against attempted hours for HOPE.
  • Requests for exceptional relief are made directly to the president of the institution. The president will make a determination on each request expeditiously.

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.8, DEGREES

2.6.1 Degrees, General

Last reviewed: January 2010

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.8.1, DEGREES, GENERAL

A bachelor’s degree may not exceed 120 hours, exclusive of physical education activity/basic health or orientation course hours that the institution may require unless approved by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.


SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.9, ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT

Each institution shall follow these general guidelines in establishing their academic advising program:

  • Each institution shall establish academic advising procedures within the academic units that comprise the college or university.
  • These academic advising procedures shall have baseline minimal uniformity in application and simultaneously be tailored to the specific needs of individual students.
  • Each institution shall establish training sessions associated with academic advising such that faculty advisors are aware of the rules and regulations associated with the core curriculum, academic transfer, student status, and grading policies.
  • Institutions that have advising units outside of academic units will be responsible for keeping abreast of changes in academic curricula and requirements as stipulated by the institution and individual academic units.
  • Student appeals concerning academic advising will follow the institutional appeals process.

2.6.2 Graduate Degrees

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.8.2, GRADUATE DEGREES

A master’s degree may not exceed 36 hours unless approved by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.


2.7.1 Minority Advising Program

The Minority Advising Program, established in 1983, enhances the academic welfare of minority students in the USG. Its goals include the promotion of academic success, development of human potential, and the creation of an environment that fosters the success and retention of minority students.

Following are the institutional guidelines for minority advising programs:

  1. Each institution within the USG will establish and maintain a Minority Advising Program to supplement, not replace, regular academic advising activities.
  2. The Minority Advising Program will address students’ academic and non-academic needs, addressing cognitive and non-cognitive dimensions of intellectual, personal, and social self-actualization.
  3. Each Minority Advising Program will be structured to provide (directly or on a referral basis) the following services:
    • A careful follow-up of dropouts
    • Special individualized counseling for academically at-risk students and students placed on academic probation
    • Assistance to students in choosing a program of study and in the selection of an academic major
    • Help in considering the long-term implications of pursuing various courses of study, and careful consideration of career opportunities presented by various academic programs
    • Peer counseling to address a full spectrum of personal, social, and academic needs
    • Access to appropriate and effective tutoring
    • Help in identifying financial aid sources and review of procedures for obtaining financial aid
    • Access to, and facilitation of, career counseling
    • Reinforcement of the regular advisement system
    • Access to study skill activities
    • Articulation with high schools to help prepare minority students for college
    • Provision of culturally appropriate programming and a forum to bring effective role-models in contact with minority students to discuss their educational and other experiences
    • Periodic meetings with department chairs, academic officers, and the president to maximize the interrelationship of the Minority Advising Program with other aspects of the institution
  4. Each Minority Advising Program should establish advising units, coordinated by faculty members with special training in the advisement of minority students.
  5. The program should emphasize service to freshman and sophomore students but be open to any other minority student seeking its services.
  6. With the approval of the Chancellor, institutions may modify the structure and functions of the Minority Advising Program to render it more responsive to minority needs at that particular institution (e.g., size and nature of institution, demographic profile, unique problems, etc.) Institutions seeking program modifications should submit a detailed request, specifying the unusual circumstances and the modifications sought.
  7. An institution’s Minority Advising Program will be coordinated through the Office of Academic Affairs or the Office of Student Affairs. In either case, there must be formal provision for close co-ordination with the other office in the governance of the Minority Advising Program.
  8. The President is responsible for the operation and the success of the program and will provide institutional commitment and support to assure its success.
  9. The President shall appoint a Minority Advising Program Coordinator, who will oversee the program.
  10. The financial support of the Minority Advising Program is primarily the responsibility of the institution. Each institution will establish a separate budget for its Minority Advising Program and financially support its activities. Special funds allocated by the System Office to support Minority Advising Programs are intended only to supplement the operating budget provided by the institution.
  11. Each institutional President will submit an annual report to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG or the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs. The annual report should indicate the program’s goals and the activities sponsored in support of those goals. It should analyze the impact and effectiveness of program related activities, and should include a projected budget for the following year, with updated goals and objectives for the program.
  12. The Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs will provide consultation on Minority Advising Programs as needed.
  13. An annual System-wide conference will be held for the purpose of staff development, improvement of strategies for making the program more successful, and general information sharing. The planning committee for the annual conference will consist of representatives from each institution type.

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.7, REGENTS’ WRITING AND READING SKILLS REQUIREMENT (BOARD OF REGENTS APPROVAL OF REVISED POLICY EFFECTIVE AUGUST 4, 2004)
BOARD OF REGENTS MINUTES, 11/1987
BOARD OF REGENTS APPROVAL OF REVISED POLICY EFFECTIVE 8/4/2004
BOARD OF REGENTS APPROVAL OF REVISED REGENTS’ TEST GUIDELINES EFFECTIVE 3/21/2007

2.8.1 Regents’ Reading and Writing Skills Requirements and Exemptions

Students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs leading to the baccalaureate degree shall pass the Regents’ Reading Skills (RGTR 0198) and Regents’ Writing Skills (RGTE 0199) courses as a requirement for graduation. These courses are offered for institutional credit. Students may exempt these courses through examination by passing the Regents’ Tests or an approved alternative test in reading comprehension and in writing. Students enrolled in a Regents’ Skills course must pass the corresponding Regents’ Test in order to receive a passing grade for the course.

The following are the specific implementation procedures:

Exemption of Regents’ Skills Courses

  1. Students may exempt RGTR 0198 by scoring at or above specified scores on the following examinations:

    Examination Exemption Score
    Regents’ Reading Test 61
    SAT Reasoning, Critical Reading Section 510
    ACT Reading 23

    SAT or ACT scores must be from a national administration. Scores from institutional SAT or residual ACT tests are not acceptable for this purpose.

  2. Students may exempt RGTE 0199 by scoring at or above specified scores on the following examinations:

    Examination Exemption Score
    Regents’ Essay Test 2
    College Board Advanced Placement (AP) English Language and Composition 3
    College Board Advanced Placement (AP) English Literature and Composition 3
    International Baccalaureate (IB) higher-level English 4
    SAT II English Writing (this test is no longer administered) 650
    SAT Reasoning, Writing Section Test 560
    SAT Reasoning, Writing Section Test 500 for students who also have at least 510 on the SAT Reasoning, Critical Reading Section
    ACT Combined English/Writing Test 24
    ACT Combined English/Writing Test 22 for students who also have at least 23 on the ACT Reading Test

    The following exemptions are not available for students enrolling in the University System after Spring Semester 2008:

    • SAT reading score of 530 and above for students who earn an “A” in English 1101
    • SAT reading score of 590 and above for students who earn a “B” in English 1101
    • ACT English score 23 and above for students who earn an “A” in English 1101
    • ACT English score 26 and above for students who earn a “B” in English 1101

    English 1102 may be used if English 1101 was exempted or credited by exam.
    All ACT and SAT scores used for exemption must be from a national test administration.

  3. Additional standardized test scores may be specified by the institution’s Chief Academic Officer for use in exempting RGTR 0198 and RGTE 0199. Such scores must be from a national test administration and must indicate a very high probability (at least .95) of passing one of the courses or the associated component of the Regents’ Test. Tests used to exempt the writing requirement must include an externally-graded writing sample.


2.8.2 General Requirements

  1. As soon as possible upon entry, students must be informed of the Regents’ Skills Requirement and should be held accountable for taking the appropriate actions.
    • Effective communication to students about the requirement to take the Regents’ Test must be implemented by each institution. Institutions are encouraged to use appropriate incentives both for registering students to take the Regents’ Test and for insisting that they take it. Appropriate disincentives for ignoring requirements should also be adopted. These may include–at the institution’s discretion–charging a reasonable fee to students who choose not take the Regents’ Test when they are required to do so.
    • Since some students decline to take the Regents’ Test in spite of the institution’s best efforts, a non-appearance for a scheduled testing time except for sound medical or other reasons deemed sufficient by the institution will be treated administratively in the same way as a failure of the test. Institutions are responsible for effectively communicating their procedures.
  2. With few exceptions, all non-exempting students must take the Regents’ Test every semester, beginning with the initial semester, until they pass.

  3. Institutions should implement the core curriculum so that at least the minimum collegiate level of reading and writing ability will be developed and should offer focused instruction for students who need help.

  4. Part of English 1101 (or equivalent), as well as other core courses, should be devoted to facilitating and/or demonstrating students’ acquisition of the basic reading comprehension and writing skills at least to the level specified by Board of Regents’ Writing and Reading Skills Requirement and, in most cases, well beyond. In approaching this goal, it may be appropriate for the institution to develop out-of-class workshops or experiences taught concurrently with English 1101, but not as part of the credit requirements.

    Since the Regents’ Skills Requirement addresses the minimum levels of collegiate reading and writing skill, the core curriculum will develop that level in the great majority of students. However, there are some cases in which basic skills may be at such a low level that the student needs more help than offered through the core curriculum. So, in addition to the pass-fail status on the Regents’ Test, indicators of “low-failure” will be identified for institutional use. These indicate when students’ performance is not close to the cutoff point, which, in turn, will indicate that those students need early intervention in order to augment the core curriculum. The indicators (one for reading and one for writing) are included on students’ data records which are returned to institutions after each test administration (a “1” in column 54 of the Regents’ Test data record indicates a low-failure for reading and a “1” in column 55 of the Regents’ Test data record indicates a low-failure for essay).

  5. Students who perform at a very low level when taking the Regents’ Test for the first time should get immediate assistance. Others, at the discretion of the institution, may retake the Regents’ Test without such help.

    Low-Failure: If the score on the Regents’ Test is sufficiently low to be flagged at the low-failure level, the student will be required to participate in remediation in the next semester of enrollment. This remediation may be a set of non-credit workshops (or some similar intervention) designed to develop the specific skills necessary or may be the appropriate regular Regents’ Skills course.

    • Institutions may allow low-failure students to take an approved test to confirm the classification made by the first Regents’ Test administration. The test should be an official administration of the Regents’ Test if one is available prior to beginning the students’ remediation or a locally administered test approved by the Regents’ Testing Program Office. Because the low-fail classification has been shown to predict significant difficulty passing the Regents’ Test, a grade on the confirmatory test that is close to passing should be required before overturning that classification.
    • Students who do not test and are treated administratively as fails need not be automatically regarded as low-fails.
    • While the form of the remediation after the first failure is left to the institution, any remediation other than the Regents’ Skills course must meet two criteria:
    1. The institution’s VPAA must describe the intervention and assure the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG or her designee that the intervention has sufficient academic rigor to meet these needs; and
    2. The institution must monitor the impact on future Regents’ Test pass rates, report this effectiveness to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG or her designee, and make modifications as necessary to improve effectiveness.

    The decision of whether to charge for the workshop, and how much to charge, is regarded in the same way as any other course fee by the campus and needs approval by the President.

    Above Low-Failure: If the student fails the Regents’ Test at the first attempt, but scores higher than the low-failure level, informal advising/procedures may be used to determine whether the student should enroll in remediation (such as that mentioned for low-failure students), or whether another attempt of the Regents’ Test without remediation is advisable. This is an institutional decision.

  6. Students who perform at a very low level when taking the Regents’ Test for the second time must enroll in the Regents’ Skills course in the next semester of attendance. Other students who fail, but not at a low level, must participate in remediation, but the remediation may be the Skills course or another form of remediation.

    After the second failure of the Regents’ Test, remediation is required before the next attempt of the Regents’ Test. This remediation will follow the same parameters as for students classified as low-failure on the first attempt (see above). Students who are flagged as low-failures on the second administration should enroll in the appropriate regular Regents’ Skills course in the following semester unless a confirmatory test administration (as described above) indicates convincingly that the low-fail indicator was inaccurate.

  7. Students who fail the Regents’ Test for the third time must enroll in the appropriate Regents’ Skills course in the next semester of attendance. The number of hours completed is not a consideration in determining Skills course enrollment.

    After the third and any subsequent failure of the Regents’ Test, students must take the regular Regents’ Skills course in each semester of enrollment. However, institutions may treat part-time students somewhat differently as described below. When determining the number of failures of the Regents’ Test, institutions are not required to count a failure occurring during a semester in which a student is not taking any classes (students may be permitted to take the Regents’ Test during a semester in which they are not enrolled).


2.8.3 Special Categories of Students

Students Holding a Baccalaureate or Higher Degree
A student holding a baccalaureate or higher degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education will not be required to pass RGTR 0198 or RGTE 0199 in order to receive a degree from a USG institution.

Students Whose Native Language Is Not English
Each institution may develop special procedures for examining and exempting students whose native language is not English. These procedures shall require a formal examination of competence in English. At a minimum, the examination shall include the writing of an essay. The testing procedures may be locally developed and administered. The grading of the essay may be local and shall involve multiple raters, of which at least two of three must evaluate the essay as passing. The use of culturally neutral topics, the granting of extended time, and the use of translation dictionaries are permissible accommodations for the essay examination.

Students With Disabilities
Students with documented disabilities, who are competent in the skills required by the Regents’ Reading Skills and Regents’ Writing Skills Tests but who are unable to demonstrate competence in a standardized administration of the Regents’ Tests may request special testing accommodations as described in Section 2.8.10, Special Administrations of the Regents’ Test.

Former Students
All students, regardless of when they entered the system, must pass or exempt the Regents’ Skills courses as a requirement for graduation. Students who failed the Regents’ Reading Test before Fall Quarter, 1980, shall not be held to a higher passing standard at a subsequent retaking of the test than was in effect at the time of their original attempt.

Students Out of State
Students who are out of state may be permitted to have the Regents’ Tests administered out of state following guidelines established by their home institution and the procedures outlined in the Regents’ Testing Program Administration Manual.


2.8.4 Part-time Students

Part-time students must take the Regents’ Test each semester, but at the institution’s discretion, need not take required remediation until after earning 20 college-level credit hours.

A part-time student is defined here as a student who takes fewer than 12 hours during his/her first term of enrollment. Part-time students must take the Regents’ Test in the first and each subsequent semester but are not subject to mandatory remediation or Regents’ Test Skills courses requirements until the semester after 20 credit hours have been earned, except in the case of part-time students who are flagged as low fails. Such low-fail students are subject to the same requirements as full time students. After 20 hours are earned, all requirements are in effect. Institutions may choose to apply the Regents’ Test rules for full time students to part-time students, and institutions may allow part-time students a maximum of two semesters before applying the Regents’ Test rules rather than counting numbers of hours.


2.8.5 Transfer Students

Having passed RGTR 0198 and RGTE 0199 shall not be a condition of transfer into an institution.

Transfer students from non-USG institutions who do not exempt must take the Regents’ Test in the first semester of enrollment.

Any transfer student who is not specifically excluded through LS status (see above) must take the Regents’ Test in the first and each subsequent semester until passing it.

Because of the wide variety of start and stop times of summer semesters and mini-semesters, students coming from a non-USG institution (including a high school) who enter a USG institution for the first time during the summer semester, may take six semester credit hours or fewer without having that semester count towards the imposition of remedial work or the Regents’ Skills course.

No remedial work is required for out-of-system transfers in the initial semester. For subsequent semesters, transfer students should be classified for remediation and Regents’ Skills course purposes by how many semesters of coursework they transferred to the USG institution in addition to the one semester of attendance in the USG.

Example: After the first semester, a transfer student has been awarded 13 semester hours of transfer credit in addition to the 10 hours earned in the initial semester at another USG institution. At the beginning of the student’s second semester at the current institution, the student would be classified–for remediation and Regents’ Skills course purposes–as a third semester student and would therefore need some form of remediation if the Regents’ Test had not been passed.

Example: If this transfer student were awarded 30 semester transfer hours, then at the beginning of that student’s second semester at a USG institution, that student would be classified as a fourth semester student and would therefore need to enroll in the Regents’ Skills course if he/she had not passed the Regents’ Test in the first semester.

The confirmatory test as described in the section on low-failures may be permitted when out-of-system transfer students are required to enroll in the Skills course in the second semester at a USG institution.


2.8.6 Guidelines for Regents’ Reading Skills and Regents’ Writing Skills Courses

Institutions are responsible for enforcing the following requirements related to the Regents’ Reading Skills and Regents’ Writing Skills courses.

  • Students enrolled in a Regents’ course must pass the corresponding Regents’ Test in order to receive a passing grade for the course.
  • Students not passing the course receive a “U” and must repeat the course until they pass. Those passing receive a grade of “S.”
  • Following are the course descriptions:

Regents’ Reading Skills (RGTR 0198)
The Regents’ Reading Skills course is intended to ensure that all graduates of USG institutions possess certain minimum skills in reading comprehension. Students work on improving their comprehension of material drawn from a variety of subject areas (social science, natural science and humanities) with various modes of discourse (exposition, narration and argumentation). Critical thinking and the following four major aspects of reading are emphasized: vocabulary in context, inferential and literal comprehension, and analysis.

Regents Writing Skills (RGTE 0199)
The Regents’ Writing Skills course is intended to ensure that all graduates of USG institutions possess certain minimum skills in writing. Students learn to evaluate their own writing strengths and weaknesses and work on improving their writing skills so that they are able to write an essay meeting the Regents’ criteria.


2.8.7 Regents’ Skills Course Requirements

  1. After two terms in a Regents’ Skills course, qualifying students should take a section of that course with additional personalized instruction.

    For a student who has twice completed the regular Regents’ Skills course to the satisfaction of the instructors and institution but is still unsuccessful on the Regents’ Test, a Regents’ Skills course section must be offered with more personalized instruction than is afforded in the regular Skills courses. In this more focused course, the primary activity is reading and/or writing under the direct supervision and guidance of the instructor.

  2. After four terms in a Regents’ Skills course, qualifying students should take a section of that course with even more personalized instruction.

    For a student who has completed the regular Regents’ Skills course twice and has twice completed the first level of the more personalized Skills course to the satisfaction of the instructors and institution but is still unsuccessful on the Regents’ Test, an even more individualized Regents’ Skills course section must be offered.

    Examples include a one-on-one independent study and a lab course in which the primary activity is reading and/or writing under the direct supervision and guidance of an instructor who has background in the specific remedial subject. All students enrolled in this level of Skills course should be encouraged or required to be evaluated at a Regents’ Center for Learning Disorder (RCLD) or a similar campus facility for specific reading and writing impediments.

  3. The Board of Regents may allow waivers of the Regents’ Skills Requirement in very rare circumstances (estimated at no more than 1–2 a year System-wide) when, after enrollment, students develop documented medical conditions that make all testing methods inapplicable.

    To be eligible for the “medical waiver” a student must prove to the institution’s satisfaction that a medical condition with onset after the student’s initial enrollment in college resulted in reduced capacity to the point that the student cannot demonstrate the required level of reading and writing skill.

    The Chief Academic Officer at the student’s institution will provide to the Regents’ Testing Program (RTP) Office a report describing the justifications and documentation for the appeal. The documentation should include a detailed description of the medical condition on which the appeal is based and a statement affirming that the student has made all practical attempts to develop the required level of Regents’ skills through each appropriate level of Skills course at the institution. After the RTP Office assesses the adequacy and completeness of the appeal documentation, it is forwarded to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG or her designee for review. The final approval of the waiver is made by the Board of Regents.

    This waiver is restricted to students who have completed all coursework for graduation.


2.8.8 Test Review Procedure

Students who fail the Regents’ Reading Test may have their tests hand-scored upon request. Due to security procedures, “in-person” reviews of reading tests are restricted to representatives of campus Chief Academic Officers. CAOs may agree to arrange reviews of reading tests (within Regents’ Testing Program Office guidelines) but are not obligated to do so. Charges may apply.

Students who fail the Regents’ Essay Test may request a formal review of his or her Regents’ Essay Test. The review procedures shall be as follows:

  1. A student must initiate the review procedure by mid-term of his/her first semester of enrollment after the semester in which the essay was failed. The review must be initiated, however, within one calendar year from the semester in which the failure occurred.
  2. Students whose essays are under review are not exempted from enrollment in the Regents’ Writing Skills course.
  3. The review will be initiated at the campus level, with procedural matters to be determined by the institution. The on-campus review, however, will be conducted by three faculty members designated by the institution as a review panel. The on-campus review panel may (1) sustain, by majority opinion, the essay’s failing score, thus terminating the review process; or (2) recommend, using the guidelines established by the Regents’ Testing Program Office, the re-scoring of the essay by that office. The student will be notified concerning the results of the on-campus review. A decision by the on-campus review panel to terminate the review process is final.
  4. If the on-campus panel recommends re-scoring of the essay, that recommendation will be transmitted in writing, along with the essay, to the office of the System Director of the Regents’ Testing Program. The Director will utilize the services of three experienced Regents’ essay scorers other than those involved in the original scoring of the essay to review the essay, following normal scoring procedures for the Regents’ Essay Test. The decision of the panel on the merits of the essay will be final, thus terminating the review process. The student will be notified through the institution concerning the results of the review.

2.8.9 Test Administration

The Regents’ Reading Test and Regents’ Essay Test are to be administered in accordance with the instructions provided in the Regents’ Testing Program Administration Manual.


2.8.10 Special Administrations of the Regents’ Test

The Regents’ Testing requirement for reading and writing skills may not be waived, for students with disabilities, but appropriate accommodations will be provided.

  1. Students with Sensory, Mobility, or Systemic Disorders
    • An alternative means of exempting or examining students with sensory, mobility, or systemic disorders as described in Section 3, Appendix E, may be used. Such examination shall equal the standards of the Regents’ Tests. In most cases, a Regents’ Test would be administered with accommodations determined by the institution on the basis of the student’s needs.
    • The Regents’ Reading Test administration for a student with a sensory, mobility, or systemic disorder should correspond as closely as possible to the student’s usual means of obtaining information from text. A visually impaired student, for example, could use the Braille, large-print, recorded or text-to-speech version of the Reading Test. If it is necessary for the Reading Test to be scored locally rather than submitted to the Regents’ Testing Program Office for scoring, a test form designated by the Regents’ Testing Program Office may be used.
    • If a student with a sensory, mobility, or systemic disorder is unable to handwrite an essay on the regular Essay Test form for rating, the institution has two options: the essay may be locally rated in the format produced by the student (e.g., typed or written on enlarged paper), or the essay may be copied to the regular Essay Test form by a proctor and submitted to the Regents’ Testing Program Office for rating. The Regents’ Testing Program Office cannot obtain ratings for essays that are not written on the regular test form or that are otherwise identifiable as special administrations.
    • The Regents’ Testing Program Office does not have to be informed when a student takes or passes an alternative test. However, the student record system must indicate that alternative procedures have been used. The documentation for each student is to be evaluated and maintained by the institution and summarized in the institution’s Annual Report on Learning Disorders.
  2. Students With Learning Disabilities or Other Documented Needs
    The following procedure is for the accommodation of students who are competent in the skills required by the Regents’ Reading Skills and Regents’ Writing Skills courses but are unable to demonstrate competence in a standardized administration of the Regents’ Tests because of a learning disorder as described in Section 3.11, Students with Learning Disorders, and documented according to general and specific guidelines outlined in Section 3, Appendices D and E.

    The documentation for each student is to be evaluated and maintained by the institution.

    Allowable accommodations and restrictions
    Accommodations that may be made are limited to the following:

    • Extended time
    • Separate room for test administration
    • Large-print test format
    • Use of a word processor, typewriter, or scratch paper for composing the essay. The student must handwrite the essay on the regular essay form for grading, or, if the student’s diagnosis indicates an inability to copy the essay, the test administrator or proctor must copy the essay as written by the student with no changes and send both the original and copied essay to the Regents’ Testing Program Office. *Reading of the essay to the student. If the student’s diagnosis indicates a visual processing deficit that prevents the student from reading his or her own essay accurately, the proctor may read the essay aloud exactly as written while the student makes corrections to the essay.
    • Transcription of reading test responses to the scanner sheet.

    Rating the tests
    Essays must be rated through the usual rating process, which does not allow for the provision of any information about the student to the raters. Raters cannot be asked to take a student’s disabilities into account when rating an essay. Instead, appropriate modifications in the test administration process must allow the student’s essay to be rated through the usual process.

    All test administrations must meet the following conditions:

    • The Essay and Reading Test responses must be submitted to the Regents’ Testing Program Office for scoring.
    • The product submitted must be in the standard format for grading: the essay must be handwritten on the regular essay form with no extra paper, and the Reading Test responses must be recorded on the student’s scanner sheet.
    • Except as indicated above under allowable exceptions for students who are unable to copy or read their own essays, the product submitted for grading must be produced by the student with no assistance provided or changes made by any other person.
    • Tests must be administered under secure conditions, and all work must be completed under supervision.

    Accommodations other than those described above may be made only upon recommendation of a Regents Center for Learning Disorders. The Centers will make recommendations for students with learning disabilities or acquired brain impairment.

    The Regents’ Reading and Writing Skills courses may not be waived for students with disabilities. However, appropriate accommodations will be provided.

  3. Students Enrolled In Regents’ Reading Skills or Regents’ Writing Skills Courses At Least Twice
    Students who twice perform well in RGTR 0198 or RGTE 0199 may be given extended time on the Regents’ Test (evidence should indicate that a student has the skills required for passing the corresponding Regents’ Test but is unable to display the skills during a timed test administration).

2.8.11 Dictionary Use/Regents’ Test

SOURCES:
MEMORANDUM FROM VICE CHANCELLOR FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS TO CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICERS, 9/19/86
EFFECTIVE DATE: FALL QUARTER, 1986

Students are permitted to use dictionaries during the final fifteen minutes of the administration of the essay portion of the Regents’ Test. Students who wish to use dictionaries must bring their own dictionaries to the test administration. In order to ensure the smooth implementation of this provision, it is essential that the institution inform each student, in advance of the test administration, of the opportunity to bring a dictionary. Written notification should be provided to students registered to take the test, and may be provided as part of test registration materials if students receive such materials on your campus.


2.9.1 Administrative Procedures for Learning Support Programs

Last reviewed: November 2013

Last Revised: October 2014

Learning Support is a generic term for programs designed to prepare students for, or to assist students with, collegiate work. Institutions must serve students who fall below USG placement standards and have the flexibility to develop more rigorous academic criteria with which their students must comply. Learning Support programs are intended to serve students who need additional support in mathematics or English (reading/writing). Students who may be served within the Learning Support program are:

  1. Students who do not meet USG criteria to exempt Learning Support placement.
  2. Students who are determined by the institution to need academic assistance even though they are eligible to be admitted without Learning Support requirements under USG policy.
  3. Students who elect to enroll in Learning Support courses in order to prepare for core curriculum courses.

I. Organization and Staff

  1. Each institution that has students with Learning Support requirements will designate appropriate faculty or staff members who will be responsible for coordinating the evaluation of students for Learning Support placement in accordance with USG procedures.

  2. The record of each student’s Learning Support course work, including courses, grades, and the results of any applicable placement test administrations will be maintained in a USG-approved format by the registrar as part of each student’s academic record. Transcripts for all students with Learning Support requirements shall include placement and current status in each Learning Support academic area in a system-approved format. See Section 2.9.3.

  3. Each institution shall develop a set of procedures for its Learning Support programs. These procedures will include guidelines for implementing Board of Regents policy and administrative procedures and USG test administration guidelines as well as additional institutional policies and procedures. Such procedures shall be approved by the chief academic officer and the president. The chief academic officer of each institution will provide written notification to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG that the institutional procedures are consistent with Board Policy and Procedures..

II. Evaluation for Learning Support Placement

Students taking courses or seeking to enter applied associate degree or certificate programs with Learning Support prerequisites, or seeking to enter programs leading to the associate or baccalaureate degree, must be evaluated for Learning Support placement in English (reading/writing) and mathematics. (See Academic Affairs Handbook Section 3.2.4 for test score information.) In all cases, students should be encouraged to submit test scores that can be used to exempt placement testing.

To exempt placement screening a student must:

For English (reading/writing

  • score 430 SAT Critical Reading or higher; OR
  • score 17 ACT English or higher; OR
  • score at or above the advanced proficiency level on the Georgia High School Graduation Test – English Language Arts (Consult the GHAGT Concordance Chart on the Student Affairs Resource page); AND
  • have met the Required High School Curriculum requirement in English

For Mathematics

  • score of 400 SAT-Mathematics or higher; OR
  • score of 17 ACT- Mathematics or higher; AND
  • have met the Required High School Curriculum requirement in mathematics

Institutions may set higher scores or require additional measures for screening and placement into Learning Support courses. (Consult the USG Learning Support Concordance Chart - Student Affairs Faculty and Staff Resources) Refer to the admissions policy 3.2.4 Freshman Requirements for minimum English and Mathematics Placement Index scores needed for admission to USG institutions.

Absent SAT, ACT, or other scores high enough to exempt placement testing, the COMPASS exam will be used as the placement test. (Alternative tests to the COMPASS placement tests may be allowed with authorization of the Chief Academic Officer or designee. Scores from authorized alternative tests must be converted to equivalent COMPASS scores for purposes of calculating the placement indices described below. Refer to the CPE-COMPASS-ASSET Linkage Table.)

A Mathematics Placement Index (MPI) and an English Placement Index (EPI) will be calculated based on High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA), SAT or ACT and, when indicated, the COMPASS placement test or other approved placement test.

Indices will be composed of:

  1. HSGPA and SAT/ACT - when both are available
  2. HSGPA and COMPASS - when SAT/ACT are not available
  3. COMPASS - when neither HSGPA nor SAT/ACT is available

For some students who score below the cutoff EPI or MPI, COMPASS test scores add some additional information over that contained in HSGPA and SAT/ACT; those students will be required to take the appropriate COMPASS tests. The COMPASS score will be combined with the HSGPA and SAT/ACT and the resultant EPI or MPI will be compared to the System level cut scores to determine students’ Learning Support Placement.

When COMPASS testing is required, the COMPASS Math (Algebra) test will be used for math placement. The Compass Reading and COMPASS e-Write 2-12 tests will be used for English placement.

EPIs and MPIs will be calculated as listed below, in priority order for calculation. That is, if available, SAT or ACT and High School Grade Point Averages (HSGPA) must be used in the calculations.

For the purposes of calculating placement indices, it is recommended that scores be no older than the maximums listed below.

Measure or Score Recommended Maximum “Age”
SAT/ACT 7 years from date of administration
HSGPA 5 years from date of administration
COMPASS 1 year from date of administration

Institutions have the option to accept older scores and HSGPA.

Student has:EPIMPI
SAT and HSGPA (1603*HSGPA)+ SATV (291*HSGPA)+ SATM
with COMPASS added (1475*HSGPA )+ (0.3*SATV) + (5.1*(CompassR+e-Write))(287*HSGPA)+ (0.5*SATM) + (5*CompassM)
ACT and HSGPA (1553*HSGPA) + (34*ACTE) (298*HSGPA) + (25*ACTM)
with COMPASS added (1315*HSGPA) + (30*ACTE)+ (4.2*(CompassR +e-Write)) (250*HSGPA) + (27*ACTM)+ (2*CompassM)
GPA only (794*HSGPA )+ (23.6*(CompassR+e-Write)) (323*HSGPA)+ (6*CompassM)
No info 51.6*(CompassR+e-Write (10*CompassM) + 795
SAT only (6.3*SATV) + (17.1*(CompassR+e-Write))(1.8*SATM) + (14*CompassM)
ACT only (155.3*ACTE) + (13.8*(CompassR+ e-Write))(63.2 * ACTM) + (6.0 * CompassM)

Students with EPIs and MPIs equal to or greater than the minimum collegiate placement index scores listed below will be placed directly into the appropriate gateway college course(s). Note that because a higher level of preparation is required for success in Math 1111, a higher MPI will be required for direct placement into that course.

Minimum Collegiate Placement Index Scores
EnglishMathematics
ENGL 1101 MATH 1011 or 1101MATH 111
4230 11651265

Students with placement indices less than the minimum collegiate placement index will be placed into corequisite or Foundations-level Learning Support.

Students who score below the floor scores in both English and mathematics will be denied admission to all USG institutions. The floor scores for the two indices are as follows:

Floor Scores
EPIMPI
3032 928

If the EPI is less than 3032 AND the MPI is less than 928, then student may NOT be admitted to a USG institution.

Students who score below the floor index score in only one area may be admitted to USG institutions if their scores in the other area are equal to or greater than the offsetting index score listed below.

Minimum Offsetting Placement Index
EPIMPI
3905 1028

  • If the EPI is less than 3032, then the MPI must be greater than or equal to 1028.
  • If the MPI is less than 928, than the EPI must be greater than or equal to 3905.

Students who have taken USG-recognized COMPASS or ASSET placement tests at a SACSCOC-accredited TCSG college and transfer to a USG institution without interruption in their courses of study will not be required to take another placement test if the placement test was administered as part of the normal application process.

A USG institution may accept a student’s COMPASS scores administered by a USG or non-USG institution or agency as long as the receiving USG institution has given prior authorization to the USG or non-USG institution or agency to administer the test to the student. Receipt of COMPASS scores produced under this provision may be through official transcript, e-mail from a pre-approved e-mail address, or fax from a pre-approved fax number.

III. Rules regarding Learning Support Program Operation

  1. All USG institutions are encouraged to provide Learning Support for students as corequisites to college level courses. Such courses must be designed to provide instruction to supplement the specific core curriculum courses

  2. Institutions may offer corequisite remediation only or corequisite remediation and year-long remedial pathways that begin with stand-alone Foundation-level courses. The majority of students requiring remediation must be placed into corequisite courses

  3. Learning Support English (reading/writing) and mathematics programs must be structured so that students can complete all requirements in a maximum of two semesters, one of Foundations-level and one of corequisite-level Learning Support.

  4. Courses in the Learning Support program shall include English (reading/writing) and mathematics. Learning Support courses in English and mathematics shall carry course numbers of 0999 or below.

  5. Learning Support programs shall coordinate academic advisement of their students to ensure that these students are informed about their requirements.

  6. Each institution shall have a transfer admission policy and apply it consistently to all students with Learning Support requirements who transfer to the institution.

    Requirements above the USG minimum set by an institution are applicable only at that institution. Transferring students may be required to participate in Learning Support components in those areas in which they have not exited Learning Support at a USG institution, as long as they do not exceed the maximum number of attempts per academic area.

  7. No degree credit will be earned in Learning Support courses but institutional credit will be awarded.

  8. The following grades defined in detail in BoR Policy 3.5 are approved for LS courses in English (reading/writing), and mathematics:

    GradeDefinition
    A, B, C, S Passing course grade
    F, U, or WF Failing course grade
    IP Progress insufficient for completion of the course
    I Academic progress satisfactory, but coursework incomplete
    W Withdrawal without penalty
    WM Withdrawal without penalty for military service
    V Student auditing LS course that is not required but taken voluntarily
  9. Each institution may use any of these grades or symbols that it deems appropriate for its program.

IV. Rules for Students in Learning Support Programs

    Learning Support Attempts and Exit

  1. An attempt is defined as an institutional credit course in which a student receives any grade or symbol except “W” or “WM.

  2. If students do not complete requirements for Foundations-level English or mathematics in two attempts, they will be suspended for a calendar year. Suspended students may be considered for readmission before the end of one year if they can provide evidence that they have taken measures to improve their skills.

  3. Students who have been suspended from the institution without completing Learning Support requirements may complete their Learning Support requirements and additional collegiate-level work at SACSCOC-accredited TCSG institutions during the year of suspension.

  4. There are no limits on attempts in corequisite Learning Support courses.

  5. Students will exit Learning Support by successfully passing (as defined by the institution) the corresponding Area A collegiate-level course.

  6. Courses with Learning Support Prerequisites or Corequisites

  7. Students who are required to enroll in Learning Support courses are not permitted to enroll in credit courses that require the content or the skills of the prerequisite courses, although institutions may establish corequisite requirements for core curriculum courses.

  8. Institutions shall inform students of those collegiate courses that have Learning Support prerequisites or corequisites. The following core curriculum areas require students to complete or exempt certain Learning Support requirements.

    • Completion or exemption from Foundations-level Learning Support English is a prerequisite for Social, Natural, and Physical Science courses. (Additional areas for exit or exemption such as Learning Support Mathematics are at the discretion of the institution.)
    • Completion or exemption from Foundations-level Learning Support English or placement into corequisite English is required for placement into college-level English courses.
    • Completion or exemption from Foundations-level Learning Support mathematics or placement into corequisite mathematics is required for placement into college level mathematics courses.
    • Completion or exemption from Foundations-level Learning Support mathematics is a prerequisite for physics and chemistry courses.
    • Institutions may set higher prerequisite standards, such as completion of Learning Support requirements at the corequisite level.
    • Any courses with prerequisite of any other college-level course would require exit or exemption from related Learning Support requirements.
    • It is recommended that courses such as music, art, and drama remain open for students with Learning Support requirements whenever possible.


    USG-mandated Enrollment in Learning Support Courses

  9. The following requirements apply to those students who have USG-mandated Learning Support requirements. Institutions are not required to apply them to students who exceed the USG requirements even though such students may have institutionally-mandated Learning Support requirements:

    • During each semester of enrollment, a student must first register for all required Learning Support courses before being allowed to register for other courses. This policy also applies to part-time students. Two exceptions are possible:

      • If two Learning Support areas are required and a student is enrolled in at least one Learning Support course, a freshman orientation course or physical education or other activity or performance course may be taken that semester instead of one of the required Learning Support courses.

      • In the event that a required Learning Support course is not available, a student may enroll in a course for degree credit if the student has met the course requirements, subject to the written approval of the president or designee.

    • Students who have accumulated a maximum of 30 semester hours of college-level credit and have not successfully completed required Learning Support courses may enroll only in Learning Support courses until requirements are successfully completed. Students with transfer credit or credit earned in a certificate or prior degree program who are required to take Learning Support courses for their current degree objectives may earn up to 30 additional hours of college-level credit. After earning the additional hours, such students may enroll in Learning Support courses only. Institutions have the authority to limit accumulation of college-level credit to 20 hours.


    Enrollment in Institutionally-Required Learning Support Courses

  10. Students who exceed the USG minimum requirements but are required by the institution to take Learning Support courses in order to prepare for core curriculum courses may, at the institution’s option, be exempted from any or all of the requirements specified in Section IV H. However, all such requirements imposed by the institution must be satisfied by the time the student has earned 30 semester credit hours or the student must enroll in course work that will satisfy the requirements every semester of enrollment until the requirements are satisfied. Institutions have the authority to limit accumulation of college-level credit to 20 hours.

  11. Voluntary Enrollment in Learning Support Courses

  12. Students who are required to take Learning Support courses in an area may not register as auditors in any Learning Support course in that area.

  13. Students who are not required to take Learning Support courses in a disciplinary area may elect to enroll in Learning Support courses in a non-required area for institutional credit or on an audit basis. Such students are limited to a maximum of two attempts if they elect to enroll in Foundations-level English (reading/writing) or math but are not subject to the requirements specified in Section IV B. There is no limit on attempts for students who elect to enroll in corequisite Learning Support courses.

  14. Learning Support for Transfer Students

  15. Time spent in Learning Support course work in a disciplinary area shall be cumulative within the USG. A transfer Learning Support student with fewer than two attempts in Foundations-level English (reading/writing) and/or mathematics may be granted an additional semester in Foundations-level Learning Support.

  16. Students who complete course work and exit an area of Learning Support at any institution in the USG shall not be required to re-enter that area of Learning Support upon transfer to another USG institution. For students transferring from SACSCOC-accredited TCSG colleges, exit will be considered according to guidelines issued by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

  17. Learning Support Rules for Returning Students

  18. Students who leave a USG school for any reason may be re-admitted without Learning Support requirements if they meet one of the following conditions:

    • Students have completed all Learning Support requirements at a SACSCOC TCSG institution and completion of Learning Support requirements is documented on their TCSG transcript.
    • Students have earned transferable credit at a regionally-accredited non-USG institution for ENGL 1101 or 1102 (for completion of the Learning Support English requirement) or an Area A mathematics course (for completion of the Learning Support Mathematics requirement). (USG receiving institutions will decide whether to grant Area A credit for courses taken elsewhere. Provided that native and transfer students are treated equally, institutions may impose additional reasonable expectations, such as a minimum grade of “C” in Area A courses.)
    • Students have completed Learning Support at another USG institution and completion of Learning Support requirements is documented on their transfer transcript.

  19. Students who leave a USG school and return without having satisfied their Learning Support requirements in the interim may be readmitted to the college under the following conditions:

    • Students who have been suspended from the institution for a calendar year for failure to complete Foundations-level Learning Support within two attempts have two options on their return.
      • Students may return to placement in Foundations-level Learning Support and have two more attempts.
      • Students may take the COMPASS test and accept Learning Support placement according to a placement index calculated on the basis of COMPASS alone. If placed in Foundations-level Learning Support, they will have two more attempts to complete this level.
    • Students in Learning Support who voluntarily leave a USG institution for periods of less than one calendar year will return to the level of Learning Support (Foundations-level or corequisite) they were in immediately prior to their absence.
      • Time spent in Learning Support course work in a disciplinary area is cumulative within the USG. Students who return to an institution less than one calendar year after one attempt in Foundations-level Learning Support will return on their second attempt in Foundations-level Learning Support.
      • Students who had completed requirements for Foundations-level Learning Support and had been recommended for corequisite Learning Support may reenter at the corequisite support level.
    • Students in Learning Support who voluntarily leave a USG institution for periods of one calendar year or more must be retested with the COMPASS in any previously unsatisfied Learning Support area.
      • Such students may be readmitted without a Learning Support requirement if they meet the institutional criteria for exemption.
      • Students who do not score high enough on the COMPASS test to exempt Learning Support may be placed in either Foundations-level or corequisite Learning Support, depending on institutional placement policies.
      • Students placed in Foundations-level Learning support may be readmitted and allowed up to two additional attempts in Foundations-level Learning Support in both English and mathematics, as applicable, if individual evaluation indicates that the student has a reasonable chance of success on readmission.

  20. Students readmitted under this provision are subject to the 30-hour limit on college-level coursework and may not take credit work if they had earned 30 or more credit hours during their previous period(s) of enrollment and have not completed Learning Support requirements in the interim.

  21. Completion of transferable Area A courses in English or mathematics from any institution will eliminate further Learning Support requirements in that area upon transfer back to a USG institution.

  22. Students with Special Needs

  23. Students with documented learning disorders as defined in the Academic & Student Affairs Handbook, Section 3.11.1,who are required to enroll in Learning Support, must fulfill all stated requirements, including placement testing (COMPASS or system-approved alternate) and course requirements. General and specific guidelines for documentation of learning disorders appear in Section 3, Appendices D and E. Students will be provided with appropriate testing and/or course accommodations as described in 3.11.5, Learning Support Considerations.

  24. Appropriate course and testing accommodations should be made for students with sensory, mobility, or systemic disorders. General and specific guidelines for documentation of these disorders appear in Section 3, Appendices D and E. Such students may be granted up to two additional semesters of Foundations-level Learning Support courses at the institution’s discretion. Documentation on such students is to be maintained at the institution and summarized in the annual report on accommodations for students with disabilities.


2.9.2 Numbering of Learning Support Courses

Last reviewed: January 2010

A uniform procedure is to be used in reporting credit for remedial and Learning Support courses on the workload of both teacher and student. These courses should be reported on the workload of both teacher and student in the same way that regular courses are reported.

All remedial and Learning Support courses should carry course numbers of 0999 or below. These courses should not form a part of associate degree or baccalaureate programs. Any credit which may be given for these courses should not be used in fulfilling the requirements for associate or baccalaureate degrees.

Non-credit service courses are not included in the category of Learning Support courses.


2.9.3 Reporting and Recording Learning Support Status on Transcripts

Last reviewed: October 2014

All students enrolled in Learning Support courses will be reported in the USG Data Warehouse as having Learning Support requirements or enrolling as volunteers.

USG procedures for Learning Support programs require that records of each student’s Learning Support placement evaluation and current status be maintained in a USG-approved format. Transcripts of all students evaluated for Learning Support need to include placement and current status information for each Learning Support area using the codes and formats listed below.

I. Evaluation for Learning Support Placement

The following information is to be recorded on students’ transcripts each time they are evaluated for Learning Support placement (upon admission and each time the student takes a placement test).

For students admitted from Fall 2015 to present:

Placement Index
EPI English Placement Index (0 - 7212)
MPI Mathematics Placement Index (0 - 2875)
Date of Index Calculation
MMMYY Date on which the EPI or MPI was calculated (could be admissions date or date of placement testing)
Placement Code
L Area was satisfied through alternative procedures approved by the Chancellor for international students and students whose native language is not English
N Career degree student who did not exempt Learning Support in this Area but whose program does not require Learning Support in this area.
P Placed in Learning Support in this area
X Exempted Learning Support in this area by meeting all institutional requirements for exemption
Reason for Placement
(as defined by the ADM Data Element Dictionary Learning Support Requirement Indicator for English or Mathematics)
S System requirement
IInstitutional requirement
V Volunteer
Placement Level
(for students who place into Learning Support)
FND Student placed into Foundations-level course
COR Student placed into corequisite Learning Support course

For placement and exit codes for students entering Fall Quarter 1994 through Summer Semester 2015, click here.

For placement and exit codes for students entering prior to Fall Quarter 1994, click here.

Sample Transcript Notations

Student Q enters with a 431 SAT Verbal, a 580 SAT Math, and a 2.4 high school grade point average. The institution places the student in a corequisite Learning Support English course based on the English Placement Index (EPI) of 4278, which is higher than the system minimum (4230) but below the institutional requirement (4330). The transcript notation would be as follows:

EPI/4278/JUL14/ P/I/COR

  1. The “EPI” indicates that this is information related to the English Placement Index and Learning Support in the English area.
  2. The “4278” is the student’s calculated EPI.
  3. The “JUL14” is the date on which the EPI was calculated.
  4. The “P” indicates that the student was placed in Learning Support in this area (English).
  5. The “I” indicates that the placement is due to an institutional rather than USG requirement since the student’s EPI exceeded the system minimum of 4230.
  6. The “COR” indicates that the student was placed into corequisite level Learning Support in English.

Students will be evaluated for Learning Support placement in English and mathematics. The transcript notations for the English placement evaluation are described above. Student Q would also have a transcript notation for Learning Support evaluation in mathematics.

MPI/1278/JUL14/X

  1. The “MPI” indicates that this is information related to the Mathematics Placement Index and Learning Support in the mathematics area.
  2. The “1278” is the student’s calculated MPI.
  3. The “JUL14” is the date on which the MPI was calculated.
  4. The “X” indicates that the student met requirements for exemption from Learning Support in this area (mathematics).

II. Current Learning Support Status or Exit Information

The following information is to be recorded on students’ transcripts to indicate students’ current Learning Support status or completion of Learning Support requirements.

For students admitted from Fall 2015 to present:

Learning Support Area
LSELearning Support English
LSMLearning Support Mathematics
Current Status
CStudent has completed Learning Support requirements in the area
DStudent has been suspended for failure to exit the area – suspension continues for one year from the date of suspension
CORStudent is enrolled in Learning Support at the corequisite level
FNDStudent is enrolled in Learning Support at the Foundations level
Status Date
MMMYYDate of current status (date on which the status became effective; date of completion, initial date of suspension, or date of placement into current level of Learning Support)

For placement and exit codes for students entering Fall Quarter 1994 through Summer Semester 2015 click here.

For placement and exit codes for students entering prior to Fall Quarter 1994, click here.

Sample Transcript Notations

After two semesters, Student Q passes English 1101, thus completing the requirement to exit Learning Support. The following entry would be made on the transcript: LSE/C/AUG14

  1. The “LSE” indicates that this is information related to the student’s status in Learning Support English.
  2. The “C” indicates that the student has completed Learning Support requirements in this area.
  3. The “AUG14” is the date on which the student completed Learning Support English requirements.

SOURCES:
ACADEMIC COMMON MARKET HANDBOOK SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD, 1985.

The Academic Common Market is an interstate agreement for sharing educational programs and facilities so that students can participate in selected programs not offered in their home states without having to pay out-of-state tuition charges. The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) coordinates the activities of the Academic Common Market for the 14 participating states (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia).

One of the primary functions of the Academic Common Market is to assist states in offering together what they cannot offer alone. Programs are added to and removed from the Market on an annual basis in order to reflect the changing needs of participating states.

States are asked to indicate to SREB the kinds of programs that are unavailable through their own institutions, and in which they want to gain access in other states. This information is shared with other states, which can then determine if they have programs that would be appropriate for the Common Market. On this basis, in early spring, states recommend programs from their own institutions to be included in the Common Market. The recommendations are compiled and circulated among the states. If one or more states select a given recommended program, it is included in the Market for residents of the state(s) which selected it. If a program is not selected at this time, it remains on the nominated program list for two more years. An updated booklet and other publicity materials are then prepared and distributed. For more information, see http://www.sreb.org/programs/acm/acmindex.aspx .

Georgia currently makes program changes once annually during the spring.

Students wishing to enter a program as a Common Market student should take the following steps: It is the student’s responsibility to contact their respective State Coordinator about possible access through the Academic Common Market.

  1. The student must first be accepted for admission into a program for which his/her state has access through the Academic Common Market. Unless accepted for admission, all other preparations could be wasted effort should the student not be accepted by the institution.
  2. The student must then be certified as a resident of his/her home state. Each state has developed its own forms and procedures for certifying students. The Georgia form for certifying students is located at http://www.usg.edu/academics/academic_common_market_procedures/ The .criteria for certification are at least as strict as those used by the state in classifying students as residents for its own academic programs. As long as the student remains enrolled, this certification will be valid.
  3. After certifying the residency of an applicant, the State Coordinator, sends a notice of certification to the student and to the Institutional Coordinator at the receiving institution.
  4. The Institutional Coordinator then makes arrangements with the appropriate officials at his institution so that the student is not charged out-of-state tuition fees.
  5. For programs no longer available through the Market, students already enrolled will be given a reasonable amount of time to complete the degree program while receiving Market benefits.

For more information, see http://www.usg.edu/academics/academic_common_market/.

SOURCES:
REPORT TO THE BOARD: COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AGENDA ITEM NO. 1, NOVEMBER 13, 1986 MEETING OF THE BOARD
EFFECTIVE DATE: 7/9/1986

The Regents’ Engineering Transfer Program (RETP) is based upon the concept of students successfully completing two or more years of pre-engineering education at designated units of the USG and then finishing their engineering degrees at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The following institutions participate in the program:

  • Albany State University
  • Armstrong Atlantic State University
  • Columbus State University
  • Gainesville State College
  • Georgia Southern University
  • Dalton State College
  • Macon State College
  • Middle Georgia College
  • North Georgia College & State University
  • Savannah State University
  • Southern Polytechnic State University
  • Valdosta State University
  • University of West Georgia

Admissions Policies
To be admitted to the RETP at GIT, students must have achieved at least:

  1. Minimum of 560 on the mathematics portion of the SAT or 24 on ACT Mathematics
  2. Minimum of 440 on the verbal portion of the SAT or 17 on ACT English
  3. Minimum of 1090 SAT Total score or ACT Composite score of 24
  4. 3.0 high school grade point average

The program is open only to Georgia residents.

Exception Policy at Initial RETP Entry
Any student admitted to an Engineering Program at GIT solely on his/her academic record, who matriculates at an RETP college but does not satisfy the RETP entrance requirements, should be admitted to the RETP. If an RETP Coordinator is of the opinion that a student would have been accepted for admission to an Engineering Program at Georgia Tech, based on his/her academic record, he/she may be considered for admission to the RETP.

Additional RETP Access Point
For students at RETP colleges who did not qualify for the RETP initially, but wish to join the RETP after the end of their Freshman Year, the following acceptance criteria apply:

  • completion of Calculus I and Calculus II, with grades of at least “B” (3.0)
  • completion of the first required physics and chemistry courses (first two required chemistry courses for Chemical Engineering), with grades of at least “B” (3.0)
  • an overall college GPA of 3.0
  • Finally, students who complete all of the courses included in the first two years of the desired Georgia Tech engineering program with a GPA of at least 2.7 in those courses may be admitted to the RETP at the discretion of the Georgia Tech RETP Coordinator.

Additional Transfer Agreements
Participating institutions will be encouraged to develop transfer agreements with senior engineering institutions other than GIT. These agreements will ensure students a wide access to various types of engineering education.

Approved Catalog Statement
On December 12, 1986, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs sent to presidents of institutions participating in the RETP the following statement to be used in catalogs and other publications of the institutions related to the RETP:

Qualified students seeking a bachelor of engineering degree may begin their college studies at ______________________ College through the Regents Engineering Transfer Program. Upon successful completion of the pre-engineering curriculum, students may transfer to the Georgia Institute of Technology to complete the degree requirements. It is expected that students in this program, like other Georgia Tech graduates, will normally require four to five and one-half years to complete the degree requirements, depending on their pre-college preparation, involvement in extra-curricular activities, and engineering major.

This institution’s faculty members have worked closely with Georgia Tech’s faculty to assure a curriculum which is well- coordinated with that of Georgia Tech. Specific times each year have been established for students to visit the Georgia Tech campus and meet with representatives of their anticipated major.

Regents Engineering Transfer Program students who satisfactorily complete the pre-engineering curriculum and apply for transfer will be accepted to Georgia Tech.

Information for this topic can be found under 2.3.7 of the Academic Affairs Handbook and the Board Policy 3.3.3, Instruction Offered Externally and Board Policy 9.3, Off-Campus Instructional Sites.

Information on Study Abroad and other International programs may be found on each institution’s web site.
Click here for a list of web sites - http://www.usg.edu/student_affairs/students/study_abroad

SOURCES:
INFORMATION ITEM, BOARD OF REGENTS, 11/1979

Research Centers
A research “center” provides an organizational base for research in a given academic area or closely related areas. It often provides a vehicle for interdisciplinary research in a given area involving faculty and students from a variety of internal administrative structures. A center may be involved in offering continuing education activities related to its area(s) of interest. The center structure may facilitate efforts of the college or university to obtain extramural funding in specific areas. It serves as a formalized link between the academic community and the professional community in the area(s) of focus. A center, however, is not an autonomous structure within the internal statutory organization of a college or university. It is administratively most often an appendage of one of the traditional administrative structures, such as a department. A center is not involved in the independent offering of credit course or degree programs.

Institutes
An “institute” shares a center’s focus on research, provision of opportunity for interdisciplinary activity, involvement in continuing education activities, value in facilitating efforts to obtain extramural funding, and service as a link between the academic and professional communities. An institute, however, is a far more formalized structure and may be equivalent to an autonomous unit within the internal structure of the college or university such as a department, division, school or (university level) college. Unlike a center, an institute may offer credit courses and degree programs.

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.6, ASSOCIATE DEGREES
BOARD MINUTES 1989-90, PP. 368–369
BOARD MINUTES, 2004–2005

2.15.1 Implementation Guidelines for Career Degrees

Following are guidelines to assist institutions implementing career degrees:

  1. All cooperative degree programs are to be listed as one of the following:

       
    A.A.S. in Business (AASBC) CIP 52.9999
    A.A.S. in Health (AASHC) CIP 51.9999
    A.A.S. in Services (AASSC) CIP 43.9999
    A.A.S. in Technology (AASTC) CIP 48.9999
  2. Although the four degree names and CIP codes may also be used for A.A.S. degrees offered independently by USG institutions, these four acronyms (AASBC, AASHC, AASSC, AASTC) may only be used for cooperative degrees. The “C” in each acronym will allow the University System Office to determine the number of students completing these cooperative programs.

  3. The options listed by institutions under one of these four cooperative degrees may not all be from the same CIP group as the degree itself. For example, there may be horticultural programs (CIP 01) listed as options under the business degree (CIP 07).

  4. The listed options and related CIP numbers should reflect the program names and CIP numbers approved for the cooperating technical institute by the State Board of Technical and Adult Education.

  5. Institutions wishing to propose new cooperative degree programs should complete the
    Outline for Proposal of New Cooperative A.A.S. Degree Programs

    Approval of such proposals will require Board action.

  6. Institutions wishing to propose modifications to existing independent A.A.S. programs may do so by using the
    Request to Reaffirm and/or Modify Existing A.A.S. Programs form


2.15.2 “REM” Courses

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 4.2.2, ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS NOT LEADING TO THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

For those students in career associate degree, certificate, or non- degree programs who need remediation in an area but are not otherwise required to take Learning Support in that area, the institution should establish appropriate remedial experiences. If an institutional credit course is required for these students, it should be designated by the prefix “REM” and numbered below 100. Only students in career associate degree, certificate, or non-degree programs may register for “REM” courses.


SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.5, COLLABORATION BETWEEN THE USG AND THE TECHNICAL COLLEGE SYSTEM OF GEORGIA (TCSG)
EFFECTIVE DATE: 1/2012
Revised: 9/24/2014

According to a January 2012 agreement between the USG and the TCSG known as the “Complete College Georgia Articulation Agreement,” the courses listed below will transfer between USG and Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC)-accredited TCSG institutions, and comparable placement and exit test results are honored between systems.

General Education Transfer list

Following are guidelines for implementation of the policy.

The Complete College Georgia articulation agreement is based on the principles of serving student needs, avoiding duplication of mission, using state resources efficiently, and expanding opportunities for post-secondary attainment in Georgia.

  1. USG institutions may create more expansive agreements with a local TCSG institution. This information should be published on the institutional website.
  2. USG institutions must notify BOR Office of Academic Affairs as soon as possible when discussions begin about potential AS degree articulation agreements with a TCSG institution AND before entering into an AS degree articulation with a TCSG institution. TCSG has agreed that AS degrees will be limited in number and meet the following criteria:
    1. Focused on specific career opportunities associated with a specific local community, i.e. AS in Logistics Management by Savannah Technical College with Georgia Southern University.
    2. Initiated in regions of the state where the proposed degree is not currently offered by a USG institution therefore avoiding unnecessary duplication.
    3. If a USG institution does have the program, consideration of necessary v. unnecessary duplication will be predicated on the capacity and willingness of the USG institution to offer the degree in the area.
  3. TCSG institutions will not offer AA degrees. These procedures shall apply to all TCSG degrees with one exception, Nursing.

  4. USG institutions must notify BOR Office of Academic Affairs prior to establishing expansive articulation agreements that include all TCSG institutions.

This transfer agreement is effective for those students from SACSCOC-accredited TCSG institutions:

  • who enrolled in any of the courses on the General Education Transfer list in January 2012 or later OR
  • who enrolled in ENG 191 and/or MAT 190 or 191 courses that began in January 2002 or thereafter
    AND
  • who meet the minimum requirements for exemption from Learning Support OR
  • who successfully complete and meet the requirements for exit from Learning Support English and/or mathematics beginning January 2002

To be eligible for articulation agreement transfer credit, students must have exempted or completed Learning Support requirements at a TCSG institution. To calculate Math Placement (MPI) and English Placement (EPI) Indices using USG formulae, a CPE-COMPASS-ASSET Linkage Table is supplied. Since the formulae for calculating MPI and EPI do not use CPE or ASSET, these scores will have to be converted to equivalent COMPASS scores to calculate the placement indices.

  1. TCSG transfer students meeting USG standard admissions criteria are exempt from Learning Support evaluation (see BOR Policy Manual 4.2.1.1).
  2. Students who have taken a COMPASS or ASSET placement test at a SACSCOC-accredited TCSG college and transfer to a USG institution will not be required to take another placement test if they have attended the institution and have the placement scores recorded on the transcript.
  3. USG and TCSG will accept comparable placement scores.
  4. Test scores from non-SACSCOC-accredited TCSG institutions will not be accepted for exemption or exit from Learning Support.
  5. Exit from Learning Support at a SACSCOC-accredited TCSG institution will be honored at all USG institutions. Students who exempts Learning Support but transfer without credit for the core curriculum course may be placed in Learning Support at the receiving institution based on institutional requirements higher than the USG minimum.
  6. The current policy allowing institutions to individually evaluate courses other than the mini-core courses and make decisions about acceptance will continue.


List of SACSCOC - accredited TCSG Institutions

SOURCES:
UNIVERSITY SYSTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL, 8/17/90 MINUTES

Institutions that choose to offer credit for military service should use the following criteria.

Academic Credit
When a student requests academic credit based on experience in the military service, the following procedure is recommended:

  1. Registrar researches the American Council on Education (ACE) Guide to determine the recommendation made by that organization.
  2. Registrar advises appropriate academic department head(s) of ACE recommendation(s).
  3. The appropriate academic officer advises registrar of what credit, if any, is to be granted in that specific discipline. Credit should not be awarded for course/experiences not offered by that academic institution.
  4. Registrar records appropriate credit on official transcript and advises both the student and academic advisor of the credit that has been granted.

Physical Education Credit
The granting of physical education credits should be based upon the following recommendations:

  1. Basic military training should serve as substitutes for Physical Conditioning and Marksmanship for a total of two (2) semester hour credits.
  2. Experience beyond basic military training should be evaluated based upon length and type of activity and the level of accomplishment in the specific activity. For example:
    • A Navy Seal should receive credit for swimming.
    • A Medic should receive credit for first aid.
    • A Military Policeman should receive credit for self defense.
  3. Credit by examination may be offered to students having mastered a specific area of the basic physical education requirement.
  4. If recommendations 1, 2, and 3 are not satisfactory, then the evaluation process will be determined by the appropriate academic office.

SOURCES:
UNIVERSITY SYSTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL, 08/17/90 MINUTES

Institutional Chief Academic Officers will encourage faculty to clarify for students, at the beginning of each course, the basis on which grades will be determined and to provide timely academic feedback as the course progresses. This encouragement should include the following:

  1. A statement in the syllabus stating whether the professor intends to have a portion of the cumulative class grade reported to the student prior to the midpoint of the total grading period and reference to how that portion of the grade is determined.
  2. Prior to midpoint of the total grading period, all assigned and “turned in” graded class assignments and examinations should be graded and available to the student.
  3. The instructor and student should make every effort to be available during instructor’s office hours for discussion of the student’s academic standing prior to the midpoint of the total grading period (particularly for classes that use subjective grading).

Each individual Chief Academic Officer should clarify his/her position on these points; discuss them with the faculty of his/her institution; establish policy or guidelines based upon faculty input; and, when appropriate, publish the campus response to these points in campus literature.

The Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG shall establish guidelines concerning the designation and sale of textbooks required for coursework.

Educational material is defined as any instruments, devices, software, web content, or copied or published materials used in the classroom, laboratory, on-line courses, or correspondence courses.

All information required for ordering educational materials should be submitted to institutional bookstores. Exceptions can be approved at the departmental level. The institutional bookstore will distribute lists of these educational materials to private competitors. Recommendations to students, as to source for materials, should not list one supplier over another.

  1. There are no restrictions on the adoption of textbooks written by faculty members. Prior to the adoption of a textbook, approval must be obtained from the departmental committee. The existence of such a committee is necessary to prevent any possible conflicts of interest.
  2. No faculty member may charge/collect remuneration for educational materials directly from the students.
  3. If any conflict of interest arises as a result of sales of textbooks or other educational materials, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, in consultation with the Deans Council, Faculty Senate, and Student Government, will appoint a committee to hear the case and advise the Vice President for Academic Affairs on a course of action.
  4. Copyright clearance must be obtained by the issuing department or faculty, where necessary, for compilations to be sold through institutional bookstores. Institutional and System general counsel may insist on this process.
  5. Royalties may not be paid to individual faculty for compilations he/she produces for copy and resale through an institutional bookstore.

2.3.7 External Degrees: Off-Campus & Online Instructional Delivery

According to BOR Policy 3.3.3, the Board recognizes two categories of external degree offerings, off-campus instruction and distance education.

a) Off-campus instruction is defined as traditional face-to-face classroom instruction that occurs at a location away from the home premises of the institution.

b) Distance education is defined as a formal educational process in which the majority of the instruction occurs when student and instructor are not in the same place and the instruction is delivered using technology.

2.3.7.1 Off-Campus Delivery Approval Procedures

The designation of an off-campus instructional location as a campus, center, or consortium requires approval by the Board of Regents through its Committee on Academic Affairs. (See BOR Policy 9.3 - Off-Campus Instructional Site for additional information on off-campus instruction.)

After an instructional site has been approved by the Board, the institution may offer 50% or more of any of their existing approved programs at the instructional location by obtaining administrative approval through the Office of Academic Affairs at least 60 days prior to the implementation of the additional program(s) at the site.

Institutions may also seek to offer 50% or more of any of their existing approved programs at a location that is not a Board-approved instructional campus, center, or consortium (e.g., a public school, a company, or an agency). Such program delivery arrangements do not involve the naming of this location as an official institutional instructional site and are usually contractual and time-limited. Institutions seeking to deliver 50% or more of any existing degree program at such a site must obtain administrative approval through the Office of Academic Affairs at least 60 days prior to the implementation of the program(s) at the site.

For all types of off-campus instructional delivery, it is desirable, in terms of program availability and mission appropriateness, to have the closest qualified institution respond to off-campus credit course needs. In cases where requests for services exceed the qualifications, mission, program availability, or capability of the closest institution, then attempts should be made to have such requests met by other qualified university system institutions.

Academic programs offered on campus are supported by processes, services, and infrastructure which were developed for campus-based educational delivery. When programs are delivered externally, those processes may be inappropriate or insufficient in the new location or format. Because academic and student support services are vital to the success of academic programs, those delivered in a non-traditional format or at an off-campus location must involve comparable levels of academic and student support services that contribute to overall student success and that are for students at that location.

Prior to the submission or a request for off-campus course work delivery, the president of the proposing institution will discuss and notify the president(s) of all other university system institution(s) located in closer geographic proximity to the site proposed for the off-campus course work. A letter of non-objection or support from the president of the closer proximity institution should be included in the administrative approval request. In the event the involved institutions are unable to arrive at a mutual agreement on the offering of off-campus credit courses, the issues will be referred to the Chief Academic Officer for final resolution.

Additional information and request forms for all off-campus instructional delivery may be found at the following website: http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/external/.

2.3.7.2 Distance Learning Approval Procedures

The Board of Regents encourages the use of distance learning to help meet the instructional needs of the citizens of the State. Approval procedures for delivery of distance learning programs follow SACS requirements and are intended to allow institutions to avoid duplication of effort in the development of material submitted to SACS and the Board of Regents for approval.

Prior approval by the Board of Regents is required for an initial program delivered fifty percent or more via distance learning by an institution and for any additional distance learning program(s) requiring SACS approval for substantive change (i.e., significant departure from originally approved programs). See SACS Policy on Substantive Change

Institutions must receive Board approval for their initial distance learning delivery of fifty percent or more of an existing approved program prior to implementing the program. However, once an institution is approved for distance delivery, only notification to the Office of Academic Affairs is needed to offer additional existing approved programs 50% or more via distance learning, unless the distance delivery of the program requires SACS approval for a substantive change. In the latter case, Board approval must be obtained in order to implement the additional program.

Additional information and request forms for all off-campus instructional delivery may be found at the following website: http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/external/.


2.3.8 Certificates

University System institutions are required to notify the Office of Academic Programs when a new certificate is established. Notification will be provided using the certificate notification form (http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/changes/). Changes in a certificate name should also be sent to the Office of Academic Programs as notification.

Embedded certificates, those certificates that are only awarded to a student upon completion of a degree and are a self-contained set of courses embedded in a major or stand-alone degree, do not require notification and are not listed separately on the Degrees and Majors inventory. Additional information may be found at the following website: http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/changes/


2.8.12 Institutional Exemption

Institutional exemptions to the Regents Reading and Writing Skills requirement may be granted by the USG Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer under delegated authority of the Chancellor in consultation with the Chair of the Academic Affairs Committee of the Board of Regents. Exemption requests will be reviewed based on institutional evidence of robust and effective student learning assessment and support for under-achieving students.

Exemptions are granted based on institutions’ assessment of communications outcomes in Area A1 classes (ENGL 1101 and 1102). Therefore, if a student has passed ENGL 1101 and 1102 at an exempt institution (or has been granted transfer credit for those classes AFTER ENROLLING at an exempt institution), then the student is exempt from Regents’ Test requirements at that point, regardless of where he/she may transfer.


2.3.9 Dual Degrees

Dual Degrees in the University System of Georgia are defined according to the SACS Collaborative Academic Arrangements Policy. Programs of study offered in which each institution awards a separate program completion credential require notification to the Office of Academic Programs at least two weeks prior to implementation. Only dual degrees comprised of academic programs that have been previously approved by the Board of Regents either at a single University System institution or between University System institutions shall be forwarded as notification items. All new degree programs in collaborative arrangements require Board approval. Dual Degrees within a single University System institution also require notification to the Office of Academic Programs at least two weeks prior to implementation. See the Office of Academic Programs Website for appropriate notification forms for dual degrees.

Each institution conferring the degree assumes responsibility for meeting SACS requirements for collaborative academic arrangements.

Should it be determined that a dissolution of the dual degree arrangement is in the best interest of the institution(s) involved, it is incumbent upon the institution(s) to advise faculty and students appropriately and in a timely manner of the conclusion of the dual degree program and with provisions for teach out agreements with one another. In such cases, notification of the dissolution of the dual degree arrangement will be submitted to the Office of Academic Programs two weeks prior to dissolution and within a timeframe that does not have an adverse impact on students or faculty.


2.3.10 Joint Degrees

Joint educational programs in the University System of Georgia are defined according to the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges Policy on Collaborative Academic Arrangements. A joint educational program is one whereby students study at two or more institutions and are awarded a single program completion credential bearing the names, seals, and signatures of each of the participating institutions. Only joint degrees comprised of academic programs that already exist and are Board of Regents approved programs either between or among University System institutions shall be forwarded as notification items. All new degree programs require Board approval.

All joint degree arrangements require each participating USG institution to notify the Office of Academic Programs at least two weeks prior to implementation. It is incumbent upon all USG institutions to meet SACS requirements for collaborative academic arrangements.

Three categories of joint degree arrangements are possible according to SACS. They are: 1) joint degrees with institutional partner(s) which are SACS-COC accredited; 2) joint degrees with an institutional partner(s) which is accredited by a USDE-recognized accreditor other than SACS-COC; and 3) joint degrees with an institutional partner(s) which is not accredited by a USDE-recognized accreditor.

Please see the website of the Office of Academic Programs for the appropriate notification forms and documentation required for these degree arrangements. (http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/changes/).

Should it be determined that a dissolution of the joint degree arrangement is in the best interest of the institutions involved, it is incumbent upon the institutions to advise faculty and students appropriately and in a timely manner of the conclusion of the joint degree program and with provisions for teach out agreements with one another. In such cases, notification of the dissolution of the joint degree arrangement will be submitted via a notification letter to the Office of Academic programs two weeks prior to closure and within a timeframe that does not have an adverse impact on students or faculty.


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