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Academic & Student Affairs Handbook

2.4 Core Curriculum

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.1, CORE CURRICULUM
BOARD OF REGENTS MINUTES, 10/14/2009
EFFECTIVE DATE: ALL INSTITUTIONS WILL IMPLEMENT THIS POLICY NO LATER THAN FALL 2011 BUT MAY IMPLEMENT IT EARLIER. HOWEVER, IN ORDER TO ALLOW FOR CURRICULAR ALIGNMENT WITH FOUR-YEAR INSTITUTIONS, TWO-YEAR INSTITUTIONS MAY DELAY IMPLEMENTATION UNTIL FALL 2012. ALL INSTITUTIONS WILL IMPLEMENT THE OVERLAY REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS NEW TO THE SYSTEM EFFECTIVE FALL 2012.

2.4.1 General Education Learning Goals

The University System of Georgia (USG) is a composite of diverse institutions that, in spite of their diversity, require System-wide coherence to facilitate success for transfer students. To achieve these ends, the USG outlines general education learning goals that serve as guides for each institution to develop its own general education learning outcomes. Each institution is required to develop one or more learning outcomes for each learning goal. Instead of presenting the learning goals with descriptions or specific required outcomes, examples of learning outcomes that would fall under each learning goal are provided.

The learning outcomes for Goals A–E and Goals I–III developed by institutions must be approved by the Council on General Education. All learning outcomes must be collegiate level, not skills-based, and broadly focused. They must be consistent with the learning goals and with the mission of the USG.

The academic advisory committees will specify learning outcomes for each Area F. These learning outcomes must be collegiate level and provide an appropriate base for later learning outcomes in the relevant degree program. They must be consistent with the mission of the USG.

Per the USG Comprehensive Program Review Policy (BoR Policy 3.6.3, Comprehensive Academic Program Review), the assessment of general education learning outcomes is required at all institutions and must be a part of each institution’s regular report on comprehensive program review posted on the institution’s Comprehensive Program Review website. The Regents’ Administrative Committee on Effectiveness and Accreditation (RACEA) will conduct spot reviews of all institutional programs. SACS’ final recommendations and findings regarding the assessment of general education outcomes (if any) must also be sent to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Achievement.

Learning Goal A1: Communication Outcomes
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students produce well-organized communication that meets conventional standards of correctness, exhibits an appropriate style, and presents substantial material.
  • Students communicate effectively using appropriate writing conventions.
  • Students have the ability to assimilate, analyze, and present in oral and written forms, a body of information.
  • Students have the ability to adapt communication to circumstances and audience.
  • Students have the ability to interpret content of written materials on related topics from various disciplines.
  • Students demonstrate an understanding of what constitutes plagiarism and acknowledge the use of information sources.

Learning Goal A2: Quantitative Outcomes
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students have a strong foundation in mathematical concepts, processes, and structure.
  • Students effectively apply symbolic representations to model and solve problems.
  • Students have the ability to model situations from a variety of settings in generalized mathematical forms.
  • Students have the ability to express and manipulate mathematical information, concepts, and thoughts in verbal, numeric, graphical, and symbolic forms while solving a variety of problems.
  • Students have the ability to solve multiple-step problems through different (inductive, deductive, and symbolic) modes of reasoning.

Learning Goal B: Institutional Options
System institutions may develop additional learning goals (and their associated outcomes) that fit their respective missions.
Examples of possible additional goals include: collaboration, technology, ethics, civic responsibility and/or civic engagement, and service learning.

Learning Goal C: Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students can compare and contrast the meaning of major texts from both Western and non-Western cultures.
  • Students recognize themselves as participants in a particular culture and see how this affects their experiences and values.
  • Students have the ability to make informed judgments about art forms from various cultures including their own culture.
  • Students have the ability to recognize the fine arts as expressions of human experience.
  • Students have the ability to critically appreciate historical and contemporary fine art forms as they relate to individual and social needs and values.
  • Students have the ability to apply knowledge of historical, social, and cultural influences to understanding a work of art.
  • Students recognize that an ethical issue is present and can distinguish ethical choices from mere self-interest.
  • Students are aware of the ways that culture shapes ethical views and can critically evaluate those views.

Learning Goal D: Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Technology
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students have the ability to understand the physical universe and science’s relationship to it.
  • Students have the ability to understand the changing nature of science.

Learning Goal E: Social Sciences
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students have the ability to describe how historical, economic, political, social, and spatial relationships develop, persist, and change.
  • Students have the ability to articulate the complexity of human behavior as a function of the commonality and diversity within groups.

Learning Goal I: US Perspectives
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students understand the history of the U.S. and can see the effect of this history on contemporary culture.
  • Students understand the importance of cultural diversity in the U.S.
  • Students understand the constitutional principles and related political, social, and institutional developments and governmental processes fundamental to an understanding of American democracy and political participation, from colonial times to the present.

Learning Goal II: Global Perspectives
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students are engaged and informed global citizens, aware of global multicultural issues, and able to explain the differences among personal, social, political and economic decision-making processes at the state, federal and international levels of government.
  • Students effectively explore the place of the U.S. in the diverse realm of societies across the globe.
  • Students have communicative competence in a second language.
  • Students recognize individual and cultural differences across the globe and demonstrate an ability to communicate and interact effectively across cultures.

Learning Goal III: Critical Thinking
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students are active, independent, and self-directed thinkers and learners who apply thinking skills and innovation to solve problems.
  • Students confront ambiguous situations and go beyond traditional approaches to devise more useful and favorable solutions.
  • Students effectively identify, analyze, evaluate, and provide convincing reasons in support of conclusions.
  • Students have the ability to consider and accommodate opposing points of view.
  • Students have the ability to interpret inferences and develop subtleties of symbolic and indirect discourse.
  • Students have the ability to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.
  • Students have the ability to identify the audience, intent, value, and disciplinary perspective of potential sources of information.

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2.4.2 Areas A–F

Every institution in the USG will have a core curriculum of precisely 42 semester hours and an Area F of precisely 18 hours. All students must meet the core requirements of the institutions from which they receive their degrees. However, see the rules regarding transfer credit in Section 2.4.9, Transfer Rules.

Area Area Name Description Hours Required
A1 Communication Outcomes Courses that address learning outcomes in writing in English At least 6 hours
A2 Quantitative Outcomes Courses that address learning outcomes in quantitative reasoning At least 3 hours
B Institutional Options Courses that address general education learning outcomes of the institution’s choosing At least 3 hours
C Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics Courses that address learning outcomes in humanities, fine arts, and ethics At least 6 hours
D Natural Science, Mathematics, and Technology Courses that address learning outcomes in the natural sciences, mathematics, and technology. At least 7 hours. At least 4 of these hours must be in a lab science course.
E Social Sciences Courses that address learning outcomes in the social sciences At least 6 hours
F Lower-Division Major Requirements Lower division courses required by the degree program and courses that are prerequisites to major courses at higher levels. 18 hours

The minima for Areas D and E are lower than the hours required in these Areas in the 1998 core. This is not intended as a signal that institutions should reduce (or increase) the hours in these areas. The intent is to put this matter in the hands of the faculty of individual institutions by roughly requiring two courses in each of Areas C–E. See Section 2.4.4, for details regarding Area D.

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2.4.3 US, GL, and CT Learning Goals

Each institution’s Areas A–E will include three additional requirements.

Areas US (US Perspectives) and GL (Global Perspectives) Learning Goals

Goal Description
US Perspectives Courses that address learning outcomes focused on the United States of America.
Global Perspectives Courses that address learning outcomes focused on countries other than the United States of America

Each institution will designate one or more courses in Areas A–E as US courses and one or more courses in Areas A–E as GL courses. No course may be both a US course and a GL course. As they are fulfilling the Area A–E requirements, every student must take at least one US course and at least one GL course.

Example: RELS 1234, Introduction to World Religions, is in Area C of the core at Decatur State University. It is designated a GL course. A student who takes RELS 1234 would satisfy the GL requirement and also earn hours toward the Area C requirement.

CT (Critical Thinking) Learning Goal
Each institution must have a core curriculum CT plan to ensure that students who complete Areas A–E attain learning outcomes regarding foundational critical thinking skills. Institutions are encouraged to be innovative in their CT plans.

Options include but are not limited to the following:

  • Designating a course or courses in Areas A–E as CT courses and requiring that as they are fulfilling the Area A–E requirements, every student must take at least one CT course.
  • Requiring students to develop a CT portfolio composed of materials from assignments in Area A–E courses. This portfolio would then be evaluated by designated faculty.
  • Requiring that students earn a particular score on a nationally recognized critical thinking test (e.g., the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, the Analytical Writing Section of the GRE General Test, the SAT Writing test).

All institutions will implement the overlay requirements for students new to the System effective fall 2012.

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2.4.4 Details Regarding Areas A–F

All courses in Areas A–E must be taught at the collegiate level and be broadly focused. They must clearly address the general education learning outcomes of the institution. They must be consistent with the USG’s mission and strategic plan.

Area A1 Communication Skills
If offered, ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 must be placed in this area. Other approved courses may be placed in this area. See Section 2.4.6 for course approval rules.

Effective Fall 2010, for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2010, students who have earned 60 hours but have not completed Area A1 must enroll in the next course necessary to make progress toward completing this Area in every semester in which they take classes.

Effective Fall 2011, this hour limit is lowered to 45 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2011, Spring 2012, and Summer 2012.

Effective Fall 2012, the hour limit is lowered to 30 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2012 and thereafter.

Institutions are allowed to move to the 45/30 hour limits before they are required to do so. For students with Learning Support (LS) requirements in reading or writing, taking the required LS course(s) counts as making progress toward completing Area A1.

Area A2 Quantitative Skills
If offered, MATH 1111, MATH 1113 and either MATH 1001 or MATH 1101 must be placed in this area. MATH 1113 may also be placed in Area D. Other approved courses may be placed in this area. See Section 2.4.6 for course approval rules.

For students majoring in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, engineering technology, architecture, computer science, geology, geography (B.S.), forestry, pharmacy, physical therapy, secondary science, or mathematics education, pre-calculus must be the required mathematics course in Area A2 at all institutions. In this document, these majors are collectively referred to as “science programs.”

Institutions may require pre-calculus in Area A2 for majors in agricultural science and environmental science. While students may fulfill this requirement with a math course higher than pre-calculus, institutions may not require them to do so.

A calculus course is required in Area A2 for all engineering majors and for all programs at Georgia Institute of Technology. While students may fulfill this requirement with a math course higher than a first course in calculus, institutions may not require them to do so.

At institutions where trigonometry serves as an immediate prerequisite for Calculus I, the completion of trigonometry will be regarded as completion of pre-calculus in Area A2. Institutions do not need Council on General Education approval to add such trigonometry courses to Area A2, but the course catalog and the institution’s listing of Area A2 courses on the Academic Programs website (http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/information/core_curriculum_requirements_for_usg_colleges_and_universities/) should indicate that the trigonometry course in Area A2 meets the pre-calculus requirement.

Symbolic logic and math for liberal arts may not be used as substitutions for algebra or mathematical modeling in Area A2.

Institutions or programs may grant one semester hour of credit for an Area A2 course to count in Area F or in the general degree requirements.

Effective Fall 2010, for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2010, students who have earned 60 hours but have not completed Area A2 must enroll in the next course necessary to make progress toward completing this Area in every semester in which they take classes.

Effective Fall 2011, this hour limit is lowered to 45 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2011, Spring 2012, and Summer 2012.

Effective Fall 2012, freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2012 and thereafter, the hour limit is lowered to 30 hours.

Institutions are allowed to move to the 45/30 hour limits before required to do so. For students with LS requirements in mathematics, taking the required LS course counts as making progress toward completing Area A2.

Area B Institutional Options
These courses must include analytical, historical, critical and/or appreciative material.

Area C Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics
These courses must include analytical, historical, critical, and/or appreciative material.

Area D Natural Science, Mathematics, and Technology
These courses must be introductory and broadly focused. They must be analytic in nature and have a problem-solving component.

Science programs must require two four-hour laboratory science courses in Area D.

Science programs may specify a higher level math course in Area D.

Given the importance of natural science, mathematics, and technology, any institution that wishes to drop Area D below 10 hours must make a compelling intellectual case that its core proposal will not lead to students’ knowing less about the natural sciences, mathematics, and technology than under the current core.

An example of such a compelling case might be if the institution proposed to put 3 or more hours of math in Area B and 7 hours of natural science in Area D.

Institutions may have Area D requirements specific to all science programs, but no science program may require that students take a particular science in Area D. See the rules on prerequisites below.

For example, institutions may not require that chemistry majors complete Area D with chemistry courses.

Creative writing and technical communication courses may not be included in Area D.

Institutions or programs may grant one semester hour of credit for an Area D course to count in Area F or in the general degree requirements.

Students in the health professions, including nursing, must fulfill the Area D science requirement with a two-semester laboratory sequence in either physics, chemistry, or biology. The only biology courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are Introductory Biology (designed for non-science majors) and Principles of Biology (designed for science majors). The Survey of Chemistry sequence (CHEM 1151 and CHEM 1152) has been designed for the Area D health professions track. Health professions majors have the option of taking the Survey of Chemistry sequence or the sequence appropriate for science majors, but they may not fulfill their Area D requirements with chemistry courses designed for non-science majors.

Non-science majors may use the Survey of Chemistry sequence to fulfill the Area D requirements, but it may not be used to fulfill the science requirements for science majors not in the health professions.

Area E Social Sciences
These courses must include analytical, historical, critical and/or appreciative material. If course work is used to satisfy the U.S./Georgia history and constitutions requirements, these course(s) must be part of Area E.

Area F Lower-Division Major Requirements
This area must be composed exclusively of 1000/2000 level courses. These courses may be prerequisites for other Area F courses and/or for major courses at higher levels.

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2.4.5 Rules Regarding Inclusion in Areas A–F

Every institution must offer a path to completing all Area A–E requirements composed exclusively of 1000 and 2000 level courses. Other approved 3000 and 4000 level courses may also be placed in Areas A–E. See Section 2.4.6 for course approval rules.

Physical education activity/basic health requirements may not be placed in Areas A–F. Up to four hours of physical education activity/basic health courses may be required outside of Areas A–F in excess of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees. Offerings in physical education/health in excess of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees must be limited to activity, basic health information, first aid, CPR, and safety courses. Transferring students taking physical education/basic health hours at one institution may not be required to duplicate these hours at the receiving institution.

Orientation courses may not be placed in Areas A–F. Up to four hours of orientation courses may be required outside of Areas A–F in excess of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees. Transferring students taking orientation hours at one institution may be required to take additional orientation hours (outside the maximum hours indicated for the undergraduate degree) at the receiving institution.

Courses with a primary emphasis on studio, performance, field study, or internship may not be placed in Areas A–E.

Institutions may decide that the first course in a foreign language falls outside of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees and/or outside of Areas A–F. Institutions that decide that the first course in a foreign language falls outside of the maximum number of hours are not required to grant transfer credit for such courses but may do so if they wish.

Courses in Areas A–F may not carry a fraction of a semester hour of credit.

Institutions may not permit the completion of any course to fulfill requirements in more than one Area A–F. Where the same course is authorized in more than one Area A–F, the student completing the course to meet the requirements of one area must take another course in the second area to meet the requirements of the second area.

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2.4.6 Approval Procedures

Each institution will first submit the courses proposed for Areas A–E to the relevant Academic Advisory Committee and then to the Council on General Education. US/GL/CT courses and plans must be approved by the Council on General Education.

The courses in Area F must be approved by the relevant Academic Advisory Committee.

Courses previously approved for use in Area A–F at an institution do not require re-approval for use at that institution.

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2.4.7 Prerequisites and Exceptions

Courses in one area (A–E) may be prerequisites for other courses in that area.

Except as noted below,

  • No course in Area A–E may be a prerequisite for any course outside Areas A–E
  • No course in one area (A–E) may be a prerequisite for any course in any other area (A–E).

Exception 1
If one particular course is required in order to complete an Area, that course may be a prerequisite for a course in another Area or for a course outside of Area A–E.

Exception 2
Degree programs may add courses in Areas A–E to their Area Fs. Students in such degree programs will receive credit for the course in Area F, and this course may be a prerequisite for courses in Area F or the major.

Exception 3
Institutions may require their students to complete their A2 requirements before taking math courses in Areas D and F. They may do so by making their A2 courses prerequisites for their math courses in Areas D and F.

Exception 4
A course that, according to an institution’s 2008–2009 catalog, appears in Area A–E (but not in Area F) and is a prerequisite for a course outside of Area A–E may remain a prerequisite for that course and remain in the core.

Exception 5
Institutions may apply for permission to specify that students in one or more of their degree programs are required to take particular courses within Areas A–E. Institutions may apply for up to 9 hours of such requirements. If permission is granted, these courses may be prerequisites for courses in Area F or in the major’s degree requirements.

Applications will be considered first by the relevant Academic Advisory Committees (the advisory committee for the degree program and the advisory committee for course), then by the Regents’ Administrative Committee on Academic Affairs (RACAA), then by the Council on General Education (Gen Ed Council). The Gen Ed Council will make a recommendation to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

Applications will be considered only if requiring particular courses in Areas A–E will allow the degree program to reduce the number of hours required for the degree.

In evaluating such requests RACAA and the Gen Ed Council will consider the following criteria:

  • The degree program is in an area in which demand for graduates in Georgia significantly outstrips the supply,
  • The degree program requires a special admission process beyond that required for admission to the institution,
  • The degree program has an accreditation body that requires so many hours it is difficult to design a degree program that is 120 hours without requiring particular courses in Areas A–E, and
  • Graduates of the degree program must pass a certification or licensure exam before they can exercise the relevant profession.

The courses required in Areas A–E must be available to and count in Areas A–E for all students, not just those in the degree program.

Some Examples:

  • PHIL 2010 is in Area C at Winder State. It is one of many courses in Area C and is not required in the philosophy Area F and is a prerequisite for upper-level philosophy courses. This is not allowed.
  • PHIL 2010 is in Area C at Decatur State. It is also required in the philosophy Area F and is a prerequisite for upper-level philosophy courses. Philosophy majors receive credit for PHIL 2010 in Area F and must take other courses to fulfill their Area C requirements. This is allowed.
  • Moultrie State requires ENGL 1101 and 1102 in Area A1. ENGL 1101 is a prerequisite for ENGL 1102. This is allowed.
  • Jesup State requires all students to take ENGL 1102 in Area A1. ENGL 1102 is a prerequisite for ENGL 2110 and ENGL 2110 is in Area C. This is allowed.
  • Seneca State requires nine hours in Area A1—ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, and one of the following four courses: ENGL 1105, Writing in the Humanities, ENGL 1106, Writing in the Fine Arts, ENGL 1107, Writing in the Natural Sciences, ENGL 1108, Writing in the Social Sciences. ENGL 1105 is a prerequisite for PHIL 2010 in Area C. This is not allowed.
  • Seneca State’s nursing program wants to move from 123 to 120 hours. To do so, they propose to require all nursing students to take a new course, PSYCH 1234, in Area E. PSYCH 1234 is approved for use in the core according to the procedures noted in Exception 5 and counts towards Area E for all students. This is allowed.

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2.4.8 Rules for Change of Major

Students switching from a non-science major to a science major must meet the Area A2 and Area D requirements for science majors even if they have already completed the Area A2 and Area D requirements for non-science majors.

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2.4.9 Transfer Rules

Students in the USG must declare one home institution at a time. Students who transfer from one institution to another automatically change their home institution.

Students must meet the USG-specified minimum number of hours in each Area A–E.

Students successfully completing a course in one institution’s Areas A–E will receive full credit in Areas A–E for the course upon transfer to another USG institution as long as the following conditions are met:

  • The course is within the Area hours limitations of either the sending institution or the receiving institution and
  • The student does not change from a non-science major to a science major

An Example to Illustrate Cross-Area Transfer Credit

Decatur State Winder State Moultrie State
Area A1 6 hours 6 hours 6 hours
Area A2 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours
Area B 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours
Area C 12 hours 9 hours 9 hours
Area D 9 hours 12 hours 9 hours
Area E 9 hours 9 hours 12 hours
Total 42 hours 42 hours 42 hours

A student transferring from Decatur State to Winder State having completed the Decatur State core must be given credit in Area D (Natural Science) for the 3 excess hours of work done in Area C (Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics). If a student took 12 hours of Area E (Social Science) courses at Decatur State, only nine of those hours would transfer to Winder State but all 12 would transfer to Moultrie State.

Students successfully completing a course in one institution’s Area F will receive full credit for the course upon transferring to another USG institution as long as the student retains the same major.

Students who transfer after having completed the US/GL/CT requirements of the sending institution may not be required to complete the US/GL/CT requirements of the receiving institution. Students who transfer after having completed Areas A–E but without having completed the US/GL/CT requirements must complete the US/GL/CT requirements at the receiving institution.

Receiving institutions may require transfer students to complete the requirements as specified for native students. However, the total number of hours required of transfer students for the degree must not exceed the number of hours required of native students for the same major.

Students who wish to take Area A–F courses (including distance learning courses) from a USG institution other than the home institution, either concurrently or intermittently, may receive transient permission to take and receive credit for Areas A–F courses satisfying home institution Area A–F requirements.

Provided that native and transfer students are treated equally, institutions may impose additional reasonable expectations, such as a grade of “C” in Area A–F courses.

Chief Transfer Officer
Each institution will designate a Chief Transfer Officer (CTO) to facilitate the transfer of students within the USG. The CTO must have senior administrative and/or faculty status. The CTO is the contact person for students, faculty, advisors, records and admissions personnel, and academic administrators when problems related to transfer of Area A–F course work across USG institutions occur. However, CTOs should also be proactive and work to develop institutional procedures that minimize transfer problems.

Students with questions or concerns about the transfer of credit between USG institutions should contact the CTO at the receiving institution.

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2.4.10 Common Course Prefixes, Numbers, and Descriptions

SOURCES:
MEMORANDA FROM SENIOR VICE CHANCELLOR FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS, 5/2/1997; 5/23/1997; 6/3/1997; 6/30/1997; AND 11/19/1997 (APPROVED 6/1/1997, FOR IMPLEMENTATION WITH SEMESTER CONVERSION)

Following are common course prefixes, numbers, and descriptions that all institutions shall use for their programs of study.

Course Prefix and NumberCourse NameCourse Description
ACCT 2101Principles of Account IA study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts.
ACCT 2102Principles of Accounting IIA study of the underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts.
ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology  
ANTH 1103 Introduction to Social Anthropology  
ANTH 1104 Introduction to Archaeology  
ANTH 1105 Introduction to Physical Anthropology  
ANTH 1106 Introduction to Cultural Diversity  
ART See Fine and Applied Arts  
ASTR 1000 Introduction to the UniverseA survey of the universe, examining the historical origins of astronomy; the motions and physical properties of the Sun, Moon, and planets; the formation, evolution, and death of stars; and the structure of galaxies and the expansion of the universe.
ASTR 1010 Astronomy of the Solar SystemAstronomy from early ideas of the cosmos to modern observational techniques. The solar system planets, satellites, and minor bodies. The origin and evolution of the solar system.
ASTR 1020 Stellar and Galactic AstronomyThe study of the Sun and stars, their physical properties and evolution, interstellar matter, star clusters, our galaxy and other galaxies, and the origin and evolution of the Universe.
BiologyFor science courses in biology, chemistry, and physics, the sequences designed for non-science majors will be entitled “Introductory Biology, Introductory Chemistry, and Introductory Physics.”
The sequences designed for science majors will be entitled “Principles of Biology, Principles of Chemistry, and Principles of Physics.”
Combined lecture/lab courses should be indicated with a “K” suffix, and stand-alone lab courses should be indicated with an “L” suffix. The approved course descriptions shown for chemistry illustrate the use of the suffixes.
The Principles of Biology sequence will be numbered BIOL 1107 and 1108 (or BIOL 2107 and 2108 for institutions offering the courses in the second year).
BUSA 1105 Introduction to Business An integrative study of the functional areas of business (finance, operations, marketing, human resources, etc.)
BUSA 2105 Communicating in the Business Environment A course emphasizing both interpersonal and organizational communications; to include written and oral exercises appropriate to business practice.
BUSA 2106 The Environment of Business An introduction to the legal, regulatory, political, social, ethical, cultural environmental and technological issues which form the context for business; to include an overview of the impact and demographic diversity on organizations.
Chemistry For science courses in biology, chemistry, and physics, the sequences designed for non-science majors will be entitled “Introductory Biology, Introductory Chemistry, and Introductory Physics.”
The sequences designed for science majors will be entitled “Principles of Biology, Principles of Chemistry, and Principles of Physics.”
Combined lecture/lab courses should be indicated with a “K” suffix, and stand-alone lab courses should be indicated with an “L” suffix.
CHEM 1100 Introductory Chemistry A one-semester course covering basic concepts and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. There is no laboratory component.
CHEM 1101K Introductory Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. Topics to be covered include atomic structure and isotopes, periodicity and chemical equations. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1102K Introductory Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1101 Introductory Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. Topics to be covered include atomic structure and isotopes, periodicity and chemical equations.
CHEM 1101L Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1101.
CHEM 1102 Introductory Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors.
CHEM 1102L Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1102.
CHEM 1151K Survey of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Topics to be covered include elements and compounds, chemical equations, nomenclature, and molecular geometry. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1152K Survey of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1151 Survey of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Topics to be covered include elements and compounds, chemical equations, nomenclature, and molecular geometry.
CHEM 1151L Survey of Chemistry Laboratory I Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1151.
CHEM 1152 Survey of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors.
CHEM 1152L Survey of Chemistry Laboratory II Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1152.
CHEM 1211K Principles of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1212KPrinciples of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature.
CHEM 1211L Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1211.
CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors.
CHEM 1212L Principles of Chemistry Laboratory II Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1212.
COMM See Fine and Applied Arts.
CSCI 1301 Computer Science I The course includes an overview of computers and programming; problem solving and algorithm development; simple data types; arithmetic and logic operators; selection structures; repetition structures; text files; arrays (one-and-two-dimensional); procedural abstraction and software design; modular programming (including subprograms or the equivalent).
CSCI 1302 Computer Science II The course includes an overview of abstract data types (ADTs); arrays (multi-dimensional) and records; sets and strings; binary files; searching and sorting; introductory algorithm analysis (including Big-O); recursion; pointers and linked lists; software engineering concepts; dynamic data structures (stacks, queues, trees).
Learning Support Courses
English
ENGL 0099 Exit level course
ENGL 0098 Second exit level course (if applicable)
ENGL 0097 Non exit level course
ENGL 0096 Non exit level course
Mathematics
MATH 0099 Exit level course
MATH 0098 Second exit level course (if applicable)
MATH 0097 Non exit level course
MATH0096 Non exit level course
Reading
READ 0099 Exit level course
READ 0098 Second exit level course (if applicable)
READ 0097 Non exit level course
READ 0096 Non exit level course
ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies.
ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze structure and performance of the market economy.
ENGL 1101 English Composition I A composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills.
ENGL 1102 English Composition II A composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101, that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods.
ENGL 2110 World Literature (one course only) A survey of important works of world literature.
ENGL 2111 World Literature I (as part of a two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid-seventeenth century.
ENGL 2112 World Literature II (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of world literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present.
ENGL 2120 British Literature (one course only) A survey of important works of British literature.
ENGL 2121 British Literature I (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of British literature from the Old English period through the neoclassical age.
ENGL 2122 British Literature II (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of British literature from the Romantic era to the present.
ENGL 2130 American Literature (one course only) A survey of important works of American literature.
ENGL 2131 American Literature I (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of American literature from the pre colonial age to the mid-nineteenth century.
ENGL 2132 American Literature II (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of American literature from the mid nineteenth century to the present.
Fine and Applied Arts
ART The Visual Art Common Prefix for Area C and Area F courses is ART (with the fourth letter being an institutional prerogative).
ART 1010 Drawing I Introduction to the techniques, materials and principles of drawing.
ART 1011 Drawing II Techniques, materials and principles of drawing.
ART 1020 Two Dimensional Design The fundamentals of two dimensional design introduced through projects in a variety of media.
ART 1030 Three Dimensional Design An investigation of three dimensional forms and space using various materials and methods.
COMM 1100 Human Communications A broad approach to oral communications skills including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and public speaking
COMM 1110 Public Speaking The organization of materials and the vocal and physical aspects of delivery in various speaking situations.
MUSC 1100 Music Appreciation (or equivalent) Introduction to Music History and literature.
MUSC 1080 or 2080 Band (or equivalent) Study, rehearsal, and concert performance or literature for band.
MUSC 1090 or 2090 Choir (or equivalent) Study, rehearsal, and concert performance of literature for choir.
THEA 1100 Theatre Appreciation Survey and critical appreciation of Theatre.
Foreign Language Courses
____ 1001 1st semester elementary course (This course will not meet degree requirements at some USG institutions.)
____ 1002 2nd semester elementary course
____ 2001 1st semester intermediate course
____ 2002 2nd semester intermediate course
FREN 1001 Elementary French I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French and to the culture of French-speaking regions.
FREN 1002 Elementary French II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in French with further study of the culture of French-speaking regions.
GREK 1001 Elementary Greek Introduction to the grammar, reading, and translation of Classical Attic Greek.
GREK 1002 Elementary Greek II Continued study of the grammar of Classical Attic Greek begun in GREK 1001, with further reading and translation.
GRMN 1001 Elementary German I An introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Beginning of a survey of basic German grammar and the grammar and the development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Some aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. [INSTITUTIONAL OPTION: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.]
GRMN 1002 Elementary German II The second part of an introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Completion of the survey of basic German grammar and further development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. [INSTITUTIONAL OPTION: Work with other media(audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.]
ITAL 1001 Elementary Italian I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing in Italian and to the culture of Italian-speaking regions.
ITAL 1002 Elementary Italian II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in Italian with further study of the culture of Italian-speaking regions.
LATN 1001 Elementary Latin I Introduction to the Latin language: pronunciation, fundamentals of grammar, reading, and translation.
LATN 1002 Elementary Latin II Continued study of Latin grammar and syntax begun in LATN 1001, with further reading and translation.
PORT 1001 Elementary Portuguese I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing Portuguese and to the culture of Portuguese-speaking regions.
PORT 1002 Elementary Portuguese II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in Portuguese with further study of the culture of Portuguese-speaking regions.
SPAN 1001 Elementary Spanish I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish and to the culture of Spanish-speaking regions.
SPAN 1002 Elementary Spanish II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish with further study of the culture of Spanish-speaking regions.
Other Foreign Language Prefixes
ARAB Arabic
CHIN Chinese
FARS Farsi
HEBR Hebrew
JAPN Japanese
NORW Norwegian
RUSS Russian
YORU Yoruba
Geography
GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography A survey of global patterns of resources, population, culture, and economic systems. Emphasis is placed upon the factors contributing to these patterns and the distinctions between the technologically advanced and less advanced regions of the world.
GEOG 1103 Geographic Perspectives on Multiculturalism in the U.S. Geographic factors underlying multiculturalism and ethnic relationships in the United States. Three interrelated themes are emphasized: the spatial development and organization of culture; population growth, migration, and urbanization; and the spatial dimensions of political, economic, and social processes.
GEOG 1111 Introduction to Physical Geography (Earth Science Survey) An introduction to physical geography, surveying climate, vegetation, soils, landforms, and water resources in their areal interrelations and distributions.
GEOG 1112 Introduction to Weather and Climate
(3 credits lecture, 1 credit for optional lab, or 4 credits if combined)
Components of weather processes, and their measurement. Climatic elements and their control factors. Geographic classification of climatic and vegetative types on the Earth’s surface.
GEOG 1113 Introduction to Landforms (3 credits lecture, 1 credit for optional lab, or 4 credits if combined) Introductory analysis and classification of major types of land surfaces, stressing geographic characteristics. Study and interpretation of relationships between landforms and other phenomena through maps, air photos, and field observations. World coverage with stress on North America.
GEOG 1125 Resources, Society, and the Environment Interactions between physical systems and human activities, and their effects on environmental quality and sustainability are emphasized. Topics include: geography of population and resource consumption, food production, water and air quality, energy policy, land/biotic resource management. Contrasting social, ethical, and technological perspectives on environmental concerns are explored.
GEOL 1121 Introductory Geosciences I (institutional option name, such as Physical Geology) This course covers Earth materials and processes.
GEOL 1122 Introductory Geosciences II (institutional option name, such as Historical Geology) This course covers geologic time, sedimentary environments, fossils, and Earth history.
History The numbers and content of history courses depend on whether the courses are taught as one, two, or three-semester versions.
Survey of World History/Civilization (One-semester version)
HIST 1100 A thematic survey of World History to the present era.
Survey of World History/Civilization (Two-semester version)
HIST 1111 A survey of World History to early modern times.
HIST 1112 A survey of World History from early modern times to the present.
Survey of World History/Civilization (Three-semester version)
HIST 1011 A survey of World History to the post-classical period.
HIST 1012 A survey of World History from the post-classical to early modern times.
HIST 1013 A survey of World History from early modern times to the present.
Survey of Western Civilization (One-semester version)
HIST 1120 A thematic survey of Western Civilization to the present.
Survey of Western Civilization (Two-semester version)
HIST 1121 A survey of Western Civilization to early modern times.
HIST 1122 A survey of Western Civilization from early modern times to the present.
Survey of Western Civilization (Three-semester version)
HIST 1021 A survey of Western Civilization to the medieval period.
HIST 1022 A survey of Western Civilization from medieval to early modern times.
HIST 1023 A survey of Western Civilization from early modern times to the present.
Survey of U.S. History (One-semester version)
HIST 2110 A thematic survey of U.S. History to the present.
Survey of U.S. History (Two-semester version)
HIST 2111 A survey of U.S. History to the post-Civil War period.
HIST 2112 A survey of U.S. History from the post-Civil War period to the present.
Course Prefix and NumberCourse NameCourse Description
MATH 1001 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning This course places quantitative skills and reasoning in the context of experiences that students will be likely to encounter. It emphasizes processing information in context from a variety of representations, understanding of both the information and the processing, and understanding which conclusions can be reasonably determined.
MATH 1101 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling This course is an introduction to mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. Emphasis is on the use of elementary functions to investigate and analyze applied problems and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communication of quantitative concepts and results.
MATH 1111 College Algebra This course is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be placed on the study of functions, and their graphs, inequalities, and linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included.
MATH 1113 Pre-calculus This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry.
MUSC See Fine and Applied Arts.
PHIL 1010 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 2 credit-hour critical thinking courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2010 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit introduction to philosophy courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2020 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hours critical thinking courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2030 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hour introduction to ethics courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2040 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hour introduction to philosophy of art courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2500 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hour symbolic logic courses. Specific course description not specified.
Physics For science courses in biology, chemistry, and physics, the sequences designed for non-science majors will be entitled “Introductory Biology, Introductory Chemistry, and Introductory Physics.”
The sequences designed for science majors will be entitled “Principles of Biology, Principles of Chemistry, and Principles of Physics”.
Combined lecture/lab courses should be indicated with a “K” suffix, and stand-alone lab courses should be indicated with an “L” suffix. The approved course descriptions shown for chemistry illustrate the use of the suffixes.
PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I An introductory course which will include material from mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used.
PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II An introductory course which will include material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics, Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used.
PHYS 1211 or 2211 Principles of Physics I An introductory course which will include material from mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. Elementary differential calculus will be used.
PHYS 1212 or 2212 Principles of Physics II (level 1 or 2 to be specified by institution) An introductory course which will include material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. Elementary differential and integral calculus will be used.
PHSC or PHYS 1011 Physical Science I PHSC or PHYS is the recommended prefix for common physical science courses that are developed. To date, there are no common physical science courses.
PHSC or PHYS 1012 Physical Science II
POLS 1101 American Government
POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science
POLS 2201 State and Local Government
POLS 2301 Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLS 2401 Global Issues
POLS 2501 Domestic Issues
POLS 2601 Introduction to Public Administration
PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology (Institutional option for name addendum - e.g. Principles I) A broad survey of the major topics in psychology including, but not limited to, research methodology, biological and social factors influencing behavior, development, learning, memory, personality, and abnormal.
PSYC 2101 Introduction to the Psychology of Adjustment (Institutional option for name addendum) An introductory examination of the applied psychological theory and research concerning mental health and well being.
PSYC 2103 Introduction to Human Development (Institutional option for name addendum) An introductory, non-laboratory based examination of human development across the lifespan with an emphasis on normal patterns of physical, cognitive, and social development.
Regents Test Remediation courses
RGTE 0199 Essay
RGTR 0198 Reading
Other Regents Test courses
RGTE 0197 Essay
RGTR 0196 Reading
SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology A survey of the discipline of sociology. Topics will include sociological theory, methods and selected substantive area.
SOCI 1160 Introduction to Social Problems A theoretical and empirical analysis of selected major social problems confronting American society.
SOCI 2293 Introduction to Marriage and Family An introduction to the structure, processes, problems and adjustments of contemporary marriage and family life.

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