Academic & Student Affairs Handbook

Procedural guide for implementing BoR policies related to Academic Affairs

2.1 Semester System, Uniform Academic Calendar, Cancellation of Classes and Religious Holidays

(Last Modified March 5, 2019)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.7, LEARNING SUPPORT PROGRAMS

(Last Modified April 6, 2011)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 10.0, INFORMATION, RECORDS, AND PUBLICATIONS

Each USG institution shall have an institutional catalog that provides, at a minimum, the following information:

  • General information about the institution, e.g., mission, accreditation, degrees and certificates offered
  • Admissions and enrollment
  • Registration and reentry
  • Academic resources
  • Policies and disclosures
  • Programs of study and required courses
  • Student services
  • Course descriptions
  • Administration and faculty
  • Graduation requirements

The catalog informs students of expectations. The institution has the right to change the catalog without notice to individual students. It is the student’s responsibility to keep apprised of current graduation requirements for a particular degree program.

2.3.1 Majors and Minors

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SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.1, CORE CURRICULUM
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.8.1, DEGREES,GENERAL

A record of all degrees offered by an individual institution shall be on file in the respective registrar’s office and shall be listed in the USG’s database of Degrees and Majors. A new degree, including external degrees, shall not be listed until it has been approved by the Board of Regents.

Major Programs

A baccalaureate degree must contain 120 semester hours (exclusive of physical education activity/basic health or orientation course hours that the institution may require).

A baccalaureate degree program must require at least 21 semester hours of upper division courses in the major field and at least 39 semester hours of upper division work overall.

All majors must be authorized by the Board of Regents.

Exceptions to degree semester hour requirements indicated above may be made only with approval of the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG

Minor Programs

A minor must contain 15 to 18 semester hours of coursework with at least 9 hours of upper-division coursework. Courses taken to satisfy Core Areas A through E may not be counted as coursework in the minor. Core Area F courses may be counted as coursework in the minor.


2.3.2 New Academic Programs

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SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.6.1, CREATION OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

New Degree Programs Overview

All proposals for new degree programs must be consistent with the college or university mission and must be high on the list of academic priorities as delineated in the institution’s strategic plan. It is expected that the institution will have already planned for redirected internal resources toward support of the proposed program before asking for new resources centrally. Program proposals requesting new state funding should be forwarded to the Chancellor as a part of the annual budget request, which will be the only time program proposals requiring new state funds will be accepted for review.

The Office of Academic Affairs in the University System Office will review new proposals using the guidelines at the following URL: https://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/new_program_proposal_forms_and_resources .

2.3.2.1 Academic Program Forecast

Added: February 2011; Revised November 2014; Revised July 2016

An annual report should be forwarded electronically to the Office of Academic Programs presenting an academic program forecast of potential new programs. All programs included in the forecast should be consistent with the college or university mission and must be high on the list of academic priorities as delineated in the institution’s strategic plan. This forecast should only include programs the institution definitely plans to implement. Institutions are required to include new programs, existing programs if planning to evolve to an online teaching format that will exceed 50% online. Future online programs should also be included. New programs that are not part of the most current forecast may be forwarded to the BOR; however, submitting programs not included in the academic program forecast must be justified.

The academic program forecast should be forwarded to the Office of Academic Programs using the linked form.


2.3.3 Deactivation and Termination of Academic Programs

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SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.6.2, TERMINATION OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

When applied to educational programs, the terms “termination” and “discontinuation” refer to the same action. Termination means that the institution is no longer authorized to offer the program. Termination requires Board approval, and subsequent reinstatement must be handled as submission of a proposal for a new program.

When applied to educational programs, the terms “temporary suspension” and “deactivation,” refer to the same action. Presidents can temporarily suspend a program for a period not to exceed two academic years, without obtaining Board approval, and may subsequently reinstate the program within that period.

However, the President of the institution should advise the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG or the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs of such actions. If the suspension has not been (or will not be) lifted (i.e., the program has not been reactivated) by the end of the second academic year, the president should take action to terminate the program. The institution’s Office of Academic Affairs will submit a request to terminate an academic program with the following information:

  • Termination date to coincide with the a regularly scheduled Board meeting
  • Confirmation that no students are currently matriculating through the program or confirmation that any remaining students in the program have been appropriately advised and counseled concerning degree program options
  • Confirmation that termination of the program will not have an adverse impact on tenured and non-tenured faculty or students
  • Rationale for terminating the program
  • Length of time that the program was in a deactivated status, if at all, before requesting action to terminate

A suspended program remains an authorized program at the institution, but new students are no longer permitted to enroll. Suspended programs should not be listed in the college catalog but will remain in the Degrees and Majors inventory of the Board with a notation that they are on a deactivated status.

For details and forms related to the deactivation and termination process, see https://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/academic_affairs_approvals_and_notifications.


2.3.4 Program Modification

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SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 8.3.7.9, TERMINATION OR LAYOFF OF TENURED PERSONNEL DUE TO PROGRAM MODIFICATION
BOARD MINUTES, 1/2008

Institutions that find themselves in programmatic decline as a result of a significant change in institutional mission or academic priorities, shall request a program modification from the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG or the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs. The President or Vice President of Academic Affairs shall include the following in the request:

  • List of programs that require permanent termination
  • List of impacted faculty, staff, and administrators
  • List of tenured faculty out of those impacted
  • Rationale for permanent reduction in programs
  • Request for in-depth study by academic staff
  • Request for report and timeline
  • Request to include outside evaluators with list of evaluators included
  • Request for action by the Board of Regents within the specified timetable
  • Analysis and impact statement on facilities and fiscal resources
  • Plan for student advisement with regard to other available academic programs
  • Plan for any current matriculants in programs slated for permanent termination
  • Plan for communications and notification to the campus community

For details and forms related to program modification, see https://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/academic_affairs_approvals_and_notifications.


2.3.5 Degree Requirements

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Associate Degrees

An associate degree must include a minimum of 60 semester hours.

Associate of Arts and Associate of Science transfer degrees have a maximum of 60 semester hours (exclusive of physical education activity/basic health or orientation course hours that the institution may require).

Career degrees include the Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) and Associate of Science (A.S.) in allied health areas in designated fields. Career degrees may be awarded for the completion of two-year collegiate programs designed to prepare students for immediate employment. Associate of Applied Science degrees and Associate of Science career degrees in allied health and nursing have a maximum of 70 semester hours (exclusive of physical education activity/basic health or orientation course hours that the institution may require. These degrees must contain a minimum of 20 semester hours of general education.

Exceptions to the maximum degree length requirements indicated above may be made only with the approval of the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

Baccalaureate Degrees

A baccalaureate degree program must require at least 21 semester hours of upper division courses in the major field and at least 39 semester hours of upper division work overall.

Any changes above the 120 degree credit hour maximum must be presented in the form of a request for waiver to degree-credit hour length through the institution’s vice president for academic affairs with a rationale for such changes and a sketch of the existing and proposed curriculum. The rationale shall include references to external accrediting body requirements that exacerbate the need and requirement to increase credit hours in a program. Likewise, changes above the minimum requirement for associate and master’s degrees must be presented in the form of a request for waiver to degree-credit hour length with a rationale for such changes.

Master’s Degrees

Master’s degrees are established at a maximum of 36 semester hours. In some cases, the master’s degree may require fewer than 36 hours but not contain fewer than 30 semester hours.

To offer a program above the 36-semester hour maximum, a request must be made to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG for approval.


2.3.6 Comprehensive Program Review (CPR)

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SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.6.3, COMPREHENSIVE ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW
EFFECTIVE DATE: THIS POLICY AND ITS ACCOMPANYING PROCEDURES WERE DEVELOPED BY THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE ON INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS AND ENDORSED BY THE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ON 7/18/ 2000. FURTHER REVISIONS TO COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM REVIEW (CPR) POLICIES WERE UNDERTAKEN BY THE TASK FORCE ON NEW AND COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM REVIEW IN A REPORT COMPLETED 1/2009.

The Comprehensive Program Review process is a campus-based program review with the University System Office serving in an oversight capacity to evaluate initial program review processes and conduct periodic audits. For information about institutional responsibilities and to view institutional program assessment plans, see http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/.

Comprehensive Academic Program Review

Each USG institution shall conduct academic program review on a periodic basis. Consistent with efforts in institutional effectiveness and strategic planning, each USG institution shall develop procedures to evaluate the effectiveness of its academic programs to address the quality, viability, and productivity of efforts in teaching and learning, scholarship, and service as appropriate to the institution’s mission. Institutional review of academic programs shall involve analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data, and institutions must demonstrate that they make judgments about the future of academic programs within a culture of evidence. Planning and conduct of academic program reviews shall be used for the progressive improvement and adjustment of programs in the context of the institution’s strategic plan and in response to findings and recommendations of the reviews. Adjustment may include program enhancement, maintenance at the current level, reduction in scope, or, if fully justified, consolidation or termination.

An institution’s cycle of review for all undergraduate academic programs shall be no longer than seven (7) years, and for all graduate programs no longer than ten (10) years. Newly approved programs should automatically be reviewed seven years after launch. If successfully reviewed, the new program will then become part of the regular institutional cycle. If unsuccessful, the institution will present a plan of action to the System Office. Programs accredited by external entities may not substitute an external review for institutional program review, but material submitted as part of an external accreditation process may be used in the institutional review. Institutions may align program review cycles with required external accreditation review, so long as no program review cycle at any level exceeds ten (10) years. Institutions must also review General Education every five (5) years; learning outcomes for each Area A-E of institutional core curricula must be approved by the Council on General Education. Institutions are also encouraged to review Learning Support programs.

Each USG institution shall provide a web link outlining institutional comprehensive program review procedures and shall post program review results on a password protected institutional web site, which shall include the institutional review cycle and a summary of current institutional reviews.

Academic Affairs staff will perform spot audits on the posted institutional comprehensive program reviews to ensure that reviews are being used to inform institutional decision-making on the issues of program quality, productivity and viability. The System Office staff will continue to provide data on programs with low enrollment for institutional information.


(Last Modified October 12, 2020)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.1, CORE CURRICULUM
BOARD OF REGENTS MINUTES, 10/14/2009
EFFECTIVE DATE: ALL INSTITUTIONS WILL IMPLEMENT THIS POLICY NO LATER THAN FALL 2011 BUT MAY IMPLEMENT IT EARLIER. HOWEVER, IN ORDER TO ALLOW FOR CURRICULAR ALIGNMENT WITH FOUR-YEAR INSTITUTIONS, TWO-YEAR INSTITUTIONS MAY DELAY IMPLEMENTATION UNTIL FALL 2012.

2.4.1 General Education Learning Goals

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The University System of Georgia (USG) is a composite of diverse institutions that, in spite of their diversity, require System-wide coherence to facilitate success for transfer students. To achieve these ends, the USG outlines general education learning goals that serve as guides for each institution to develop its own general education learning outcomes. Each institution is required to develop one or more learning outcomes for each learning goal. Instead of presenting the learning goals with descriptions or specific required outcomes, examples of learning outcomes that would fall under each learning goal are provided.

The learning outcomes for Goals A–E developed by institutions must be approved by the Council on General Education. All learning outcomes must be collegiate level, not skills-based, and broadly focused. They must be consistent with the learning goals and with the mission of the USG.

The academic advisory committees will specify learning outcomes for each Area F. These learning outcomes must be collegiate level and provide an appropriate base for later learning outcomes in the relevant degree program. They must be consistent with the mission of the USG.

Per the USG Comprehensive Program Review Policy (BoR Policy 3.6.3, Comprehensive Academic Program Review), the assessment of general education learning outcomes is required at all institutions and must be a part of each institution’s regular report on comprehensive program review posted on the institution’s Comprehensive Program Review website. The Regents’ Administrative Committee on Effectiveness and Accreditation (RACEA) will conduct spot reviews of all institutional programs. SACS’ final recommendations and findings regarding the assessment of general education outcomes (if any) must also be sent to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Achievement.

Learning Goal A1: Communication Outcomes
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students produce well-organized communication that meets conventional standards of correctness, exhibits an appropriate style, and presents substantial material.
  • Students communicate effectively using appropriate writing conventions.
  • Students have the ability to assimilate, analyze, and present in oral and written forms, a body of information.
  • Students have the ability to adapt communication to circumstances and audience.
  • Students have the ability to interpret content of written materials on related topics from various disciplines.
  • Students demonstrate an understanding of what constitutes plagiarism and acknowledge the use of information sources.

Learning Goal A2: Quantitative Outcomes
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students have a strong foundation in mathematical concepts, processes, and structure.
  • Students effectively apply symbolic representations to model and solve problems.
  • Students have the ability to model situations from a variety of settings in generalized mathematical forms.
  • Students have the ability to express and manipulate mathematical information, concepts, and thoughts in verbal, numeric, graphical, and symbolic forms while solving a variety of problems.
  • Students have the ability to solve multiple-step problems through different (inductive, deductive, and symbolic) modes of reasoning.

Learning Goal B: Institutional Options
System institutions may develop additional learning goals (and their associated outcomes) that fit their respective missions.
Examples of possible additional goals include: collaboration, technology, ethics, civic responsibility and/or civic engagement, and service learning.

Learning Goal C: Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students can compare and contrast the meaning of major texts from both Western and non-Western cultures.
  • Students recognize themselves as participants in a particular culture and see how this affects their experiences and values.
  • Students have the ability to make informed judgments about art forms from various cultures including their own culture.
  • Students have the ability to recognize the fine arts as expressions of human experience.
  • Students have the ability to critically appreciate historical and contemporary fine art forms as they relate to individual and social needs and values.
  • Students have the ability to apply knowledge of historical, social, and cultural influences to understanding a work of art.
  • Students recognize that an ethical issue is present and can distinguish ethical choices from mere self-interest.
  • Students are aware of the ways that culture shapes ethical views and can critically evaluate those views.

Learning Goal D: Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Technology
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students have the ability to understand the physical universe and science’s relationship to it.
  • Students have the ability to understand the changing nature of science.

Learning Goal E: Social Sciences
Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:

  • Students have the ability to describe how historical, economic, political, social, and spatial relationships develop, persist, and change.
  • Students have the ability to articulate the complexity of human behavior as a function of the commonality and diversity within groups.

(Last Modified October 12, 2020)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3, ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
BoR POLICY MANUAL 8, PERSONNEL
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.4.1, SEMESTER SYSTEM
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.4.2, UNIFORM ACADEMIC CALENDAR
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.4.3, RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.4.4, INSTRUCTIONAL TIME
BoR POLICY MANUAL 8.2.6, HOLIDAYS

Procedures related to the Calendar of Academic Activities for USG institutions include the following information:

Semester System
Determination of specific days and times of course offerings is left to the discretion of the institution in order to provide for flexible scheduling within the parameters of BOR Policy 3.4.1

Uniform Academic Calendar
The starting and ending dates for each semester are determined by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG. The following link provides information concerning the earliest starting and latest ending dates by term for each institution: http://www.usg.edu/academics/calendars/.

Religious Holiday Schedule
Decisions as to which religious holidays are covered by institutional policy are left to the discretion of individual USG institutions since the characteristics of the student body and faculty may vary considerably among institutions. The intent and spirit of the policy should be honored by making special arrangements for individuals where such an action is deemed to be best for the institution as a whole.

Cancellation of Classes
If severe weather requires the cancellation of classes, “makeup” days shall be scheduled according to the academic calendar of the institution with sensitivity to institutionally established dates. Any rescheduling shall observe the institution’s policy on religious holidays.

Institutional Holidays
USG institutions shall have twelve official paid holidays each calendar year for employees. The paid holidays are in addition to earned vacation time. Terminated employees are not paid for official holidays or sick leave after the last working day of employment.

2.4.2 Areas A–F

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Every institution in the USG will have a core curriculum of precisely 42 semester hours and an Area F of precisely 18 hours. All students must meet the core requirements of the institutions from which they receive their degrees. However, see the rules regarding transfer credit in Section 2.4.9, Transfer Rules.

Area Area Name Description Hours Required
A1 Communication Outcomes Courses that address learning outcomes in writing in English At least 6 hours
A2 Quantitative Outcomes Courses that address learning outcomes in quantitative reasoning At least 3 hours
B Institutional Options Courses that address general education learning outcomes of the institution’s choosing At least 3 hours
C Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics Courses that address learning outcomes in humanities, fine arts, and ethics At least 6 hours
D Natural Science, Mathematics, and Technology Courses that address learning outcomes in the natural sciences, mathematics, and technology. At least 7 hours. At least 4 of these hours must be in a lab science course.
E Social Sciences Courses that address learning outcomes in the social sciences At least 6 hours
F Lower-Division Major Requirements Lower division courses required by the degree program and courses that are prerequisites to major courses at higher levels. 18 hours

The minimal for Areas D and E are lower than the hours required in these Areas in the 1998 core. This is not intended as a signal that institutions should reduce (or increase) the hours in these areas. The intent is to put this matter in the hands of the faculty of individual institutions by roughly requiring two courses in each of Areas C–E. See Section 2.4.4, for details regarding Area D.


2.4.3 Section Removed

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This section has been removed due to removal of the “overlay” requirement.


2.4.4 Details Regarding Areas A–F

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All courses in Areas A–E must be taught at the collegiate level and be broadly focused. They must clearly address the general education learning outcomes of the institution. They must be consistent with the USG’s mission and strategic plan.

Area A1 Communication Skills
If offered, ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 must be placed in this area. Other approved courses may be placed in this area. See Section 2.4.6 for course approval rules.

Effective Fall 2010, for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2010, students who have earned 60 hours but have not completed Area A1 must enroll in the next course necessary to make progress toward completing this Area in every semester in which they take classes.

Effective Fall 2011, this hour limit is lowered to 45 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2011, Spring 2012, and Summer 2012.

Effective Fall 2012, the hour limit is lowered to 30 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2012 and thereafter.

Institutions are allowed to move to the 45/30 hour limits before they are required to do so. For students with Learning Support requirements in English, taking the required Learning Support course counts as making progress toward completing Area A1.

Area A2 Quantitative Skills
If offered, MATH 1001, MATH 1101, MATH 1111 and MATH 1113 must be placed in this area. MATH 1113 may also be placed in Area D. Other approved courses may be placed in this area. See Section 2.4.6 for course approval rules.

Math Pathways for STEM students - For students majoring in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, engineering technology, architecture, computer science, geology, geography (B.S.), forestry, pharmacy, physical therapy, secondary science, or mathematics education, pre-calculus must be the required mathematics course in Area A2 at all institutions. In this document, these majors are collectively referred to as “science programs.”

Institutions may require pre-calculus in Area A2 for majors in agricultural science and environmental science. While students may fulfill this requirement with a math course higher than pre-calculus, institutions may not require them to do so.

A calculus course is required in Area A2 for all engineering majors and for all programs at Georgia Institute of Technology. While students may fulfill this requirement with a math course higher than a first course in calculus, institutions may not require them to do so.

At institutions where trigonometry serves as an immediate prerequisite for Calculus I, the completion of trigonometry will be regarded as completion of pre-calculus in Area A2. Institutions do not need Council on General Education approval to designate a trigonometry course approved for Area A2 as satisfying the pre-calculus standard, but the course catalog and the institution’s listing of Area A2 courses on the Academic Programs website (http://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/information/core_curriculum_requirements_for_usg_colleges_and_universities/) should indicate that the trigonometry course in Area A2 meets the pre-calculus requirement.

Math Pathways for non-STEM students - Students in programs other than the mathematics, science, technology, and engineering programs listed above may select from among MATH 1001 – Quantitative Reasoning, MATH 1101 – Introduction to Mathematical Modeling, or MATH 1111 - College Algebra.

Institutions may not require students in non-STEM programs to take a particular mathematics course from among MATH 1001, 1101, and 1111 unless this course appeared as a prerequisite for a program-required course in the institution’s 2008-2009 catalog, or the institution has applied for and received permission to specify that students in certain degree programs be required to take particular courses with on Areas A – E (see Section 2.4.7, Exceptions 3 & 4 below).

The purpose of MATH 1111 - College Algebra is to prepare students for taking Pre-Calculus and Calculus. It is not an appropriate mathematics course for students whose programs of study will not require them to take a Calculus course. Students whose programs of study will not require them to take a Calculus course should be advised to take MATH 1001 or MATH 1101.

MATH 1401/STAT 1401 Elementary Statistics is an appropriate first or second math course for students in non-STEM pathways as well as for students in some STEM pathways. Most students who plan to take MATH 1401/STAT 1401 as their second math course should select MATH 1001 or 1101 as their Area A2 math course.

Symbolic logic and math for liberal arts may not be used as substitutions for Quantitative Reasoning, or Introduction to Mathematical Modeling, or College Algebra in Area A2.

Institutions or programs may grant one semester hour of credit for an Area A2 course to count in Area F or in the general degree requirements.

Effective Fall 2010, for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2010, students who have earned 60 hours but have not completed Area A2 must enroll in the next course necessary to make progress toward completing this Area in every semester in which they take classes.

Effective Fall 2011, this hour limit is lowered to 45 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2011, Spring 2012, and Summer 2012.

Effective Fall 2012, freshmen entering the USG system Fall 2012 and thereafter, the hour limit is lowered to 30 hours.

Institutions are allowed to move to the 45/30 hour limits before required to do so. For students with Learning Support requirements in mathematics, taking the required Learning Support course counts as making progress toward completing Area A2.

Area B Institutional Options
These courses must include analytical, historical, critical and/or appreciative material.

Area C Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics
These courses must include analytical, historical, critical, and/or appreciative material.

Area D Natural Science, Mathematics, and Technology
These courses must be introductory and broadly focused. They must be analytic in nature and have a problem-solving component.

Science programs must require two four-hour laboratory science courses in Area D.

Science programs may specify a higher level math course in Area D.

Given the importance of natural science, mathematics, and technology, any institution that wishes to drop Area D below 10 hours must make a compelling intellectual case that its core proposal will not lead to students’ knowing less about the natural sciences, mathematics, and technology than under the current core.

An example of such a compelling case might be if the institution proposed to put 3 or more hours of math in Area B and 7 hours of natural science in Area D.

Institutions may have Area D requirements specific to all science programs, but no science program may require that students take a particular science in Area D. See the rules on prerequisites below.

For example, institutions may not require that chemistry majors complete Area D with chemistry courses.

Creative writing and technical communication courses may not be included in Area D.

Institutions or programs may grant one semester hour of credit for an Area D course to count in Area F or in the general degree requirements.

Students in the health professions, including nursing, must fulfill the Area D science requirement with a two-semester laboratory sequence in either physics, chemistry, or biology. The only biology courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are Introductory Biology (designed for non-science majors) and Principles of Biology (designed for science majors). The Survey of Chemistry sequence (CHEM 1151 and CHEM 1152) has been designed for the Area D health professions track. Health professions majors have the option of taking the Survey of Chemistry sequence or the sequence appropriate for science majors, but they may not fulfill their Area D requirements with chemistry courses designed for non-science majors.

Non-science majors may use the Survey of Chemistry sequence to fulfill the Area D requirements, but it may not be used to fulfill the science requirements for science majors not in the health professions.

Area E Social Sciences
These courses must include analytical, historical, critical and/or appreciative material. If course work is used to satisfy the U.S./Georgia history and constitutions requirements, these course(s) must be part of Area E.

Area F Lower-Division Major Requirements
This area must be composed exclusively of 1000/2000 level courses. These courses may be prerequisites for other Area F courses and/or for major courses at higher levels.


2.4.5 Rules Regarding Inclusion in Areas A–F

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Every institution must offer a path to completing all Area A–E requirements composed exclusively of 1000 and 2000 level courses. Other approved 3000 and 4000 level courses may also be placed in Areas A–E. See Section 2.4.6 for course approval rules.

Physical education activity/basic health requirements may not be placed in Areas A–F. Up to four hours of physical education activity/basic health courses may be required outside of Areas A–F in excess of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees. Offerings in physical education/health in excess of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees must be limited to activity, basic health information, first aid, CPR, and safety courses. Transferring students taking physical education/basic health hours at one institution may not be required to duplicate these hours at the receiving institution.

Orientation courses may not be placed in Areas A–F. Up to four hours of orientation courses may be required outside of Areas A–F in excess of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees. Transferring students taking orientation hours at one institution may be required to take additional orientation hours (outside the maximum hours indicated for the undergraduate degree) at the receiving institution.

Courses with a primary emphasis on studio, performance, field study, or internship may not be placed in Areas A–E.

Institutions may decide that the first course in a foreign language falls outside of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees and/or outside of Areas A–F. Institutions that decide that the first course in a foreign language falls outside of the maximum number of hours are not required to grant transfer credit for such courses but may do so if they wish.

Courses in Areas A–F may not carry a fraction of a semester hour of credit.

Except as required by accrediting agencies, core curriculum credits do not have an expiration date.

Institutions may not permit the completion of any course to fulfill requirements in more than one Area A–F. Where the same course is authorized in more than one Area A–F, the student completing the course to meet the requirements of one area must take another course in the second area to meet the requirements of the second area.


2.4.6 Approval Procedures

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Each institution will first submit the courses proposed for Areas A–E to the relevant Academic Advisory Committee and then to the Council on General Education.

Courses previously approved for use in Area A–F at an institution do not require re-approval for use at that institution.

Learning outcomes and courses that are authorized for Area F must be established by the relevant Academic Advisory Committees. Institutions must follow these guidelines when making changes to Area F requirements for their degree programs. Therefore, no approval is needed for institutions to add individual courses to Area F. The respective Academic Advisory Committees must review their Area F guidelines and institutional offerings regularly to ensure institutional compliance with the Advisory Committee-approved guidelines. Advisory Committees will discuss perceived non-compliant Area Fs with the Chief Academic Officer of the impacted institution. If necessary, the matter will be referred to the USG Chief Academic Officer or another Academic Affairs Officer.

Academic Advisory Committees must follow the process described below when making changes to the learning outcomes and course guidelines for their respective Area Fs.

  • The proposed changes to Area F guidelines must be approved by the respective Academic Advisory Committee and submitted for consideration by the General Education Council.
  • Changes to Area F guidelines must be approved by the Council on General Education and submitted to the Regents Advisory Committee on Academic Affairs (RACAA).
  • If approved by RACAA, the Area F changes will be submitted to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs for revision of the academic programs website and implementation in the review of new program proposals.

Form: The form to be used for making changes to Area F Learning Outcomes or Course Guidelines is linked below.

Form for Proposed Changes to Area F Learning Outcomes or Course Guidelines


2.4.7 Prerequisites and Exceptions

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Courses in one area (A–E) may be prerequisites for other courses in that area.

Except as noted below,

  • No course in Area A–E may be a prerequisite for any course outside Areas A–E
  • No course in one area (A–E) may be a prerequisite for any course in any other area (A–E).

Exception 1
If one particular course is required in order to complete an Area, that course may be a prerequisite for a course in another Area or for a course outside of Area A–E.

Exception 2
Degree programs may add courses in Areas A–E to their Area Fs. Students in such degree programs will receive credit for the course in Area F, and this course may be a prerequisite for courses in Area F or the major. Unless required of all students in Area B or C, any foreign language courses approved for inclusion in Areas A – E must also be included in Area F for majors requiring foreign languages, so that foreign language courses included in Areas A – E do not become required prerequisites for Area F courses.

Exception 3
Institutions may require their students to complete their A2 requirements before taking math courses in Areas D and F. They may do so by making their A2 courses prerequisites for their math courses in Areas D and F.

Exception 4
A course that, according to an institution’s 2008–2009 catalog, appears in Area A–E (but not in Area F) and is a prerequisite for a course outside of Area A–E may remain a prerequisite for that course and remain in the core.

Exception 5
Institutions may apply for permission to specify that students in one or more of their degree programs are required to take particular courses within Areas A–E. Institutions may apply for up to 9 hours of such requirements. If permission is granted, these courses may be prerequisites for courses in Area F or in the major’s degree requirements.

Applications will be considered first by the relevant Academic Advisory Committees (the advisory committee for the degree program and the advisory committee for course), then by the Regents’ Administrative Committee on Academic Affairs (RACAA), then by the Council on General Education (Gen Ed Council). The Gen Ed Council will make a recommendation to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

Applications will be considered only if requiring particular courses in Areas A–E will allow the degree program to reduce the number of hours required for the degree.

In evaluating such requests RACAA and the Gen Ed Council will consider the following criteria:

  • The degree program is in an area in which demand for graduates in Georgia significantly outstrips the supply,
  • The degree program requires a special admission process beyond that required for admission to the institution,
  • The degree program has an accreditation body that requires so many hours it is difficult to design a degree program that is 120 hours without requiring particular courses in Areas A–E, and
  • Graduates of the degree program must pass a certification or licensure exam before they can exercise the relevant profession.

The courses required in Areas A–E must be available to and count in Areas A–E for all students, not just those in the degree program.

Some Examples:

  • PHIL 2010 is in Area C at Winder State. It is one of many courses in Area C and is not required in the philosophy Area F and is a prerequisite for upper-level philosophy courses. This is not allowed.
  • PHIL 2010 is in Area C at Decatur State. It is also required in the philosophy Area F and is a prerequisite for upper-level philosophy courses. Philosophy majors receive credit for PHIL 2010 in Area F and must take other courses to fulfill their Area C requirements. This is allowed.
  • Moultrie State requires ENGL 1101 and 1102 in Area A1. ENGL 1101 is a prerequisite for ENGL 1102. This is allowed.
  • Jesup State requires all students to take ENGL 1102 in Area A1. ENGL 1102 is a prerequisite for ENGL 2110 and ENGL 2110 is in Area C. This is allowed.
  • Seneca State requires nine hours in Area A1—ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, and one of the following four courses: ENGL 1105, Writing in the Humanities, ENGL 1106, Writing in the Fine Arts, ENGL 1107, Writing in the Natural Sciences, ENGL 1108, Writing in the Social Sciences. ENGL 1105 is a prerequisite for PHIL 2010 in Area C. This is not allowed.
  • Seneca State’s nursing program wants to move from 123 to 120 hours. To do so, they propose to require all nursing students to take a new course, PSYCH 1234, in Area E. PSYCH 1234 is approved for use in the core according to the procedures noted in Exception 5 and counts towards Area E for all students. This is allowed.

2.4.8 Rules for Change of Major

(Last Modified April 12, 2011)   Report a broken link

Students switching from a non-science major to a science major must meet the Area A2 and Area D requirements for science majors even if they have already completed the Area A2 and Area D requirements for non-science majors.


2.4.9 Transfer Rules

(Last Modified September 28, 2020)   Report a broken link

Students in the USG must declare one home institution at a time. Students who transfer from one institution to another automatically change their home institution.

Students must meet the USG-specified minimum number of hours in each Area A–E.

Students successfully completing a course in one institution’s Areas A–E will receive full credit in Areas A–E for the course upon transfer to another USG institution as long as the following conditions are met:

  • The course is within the Area hours limitations of either the sending institution or the receiving institution and
  • The student does not change from a non-science major to a science major

An Example to Illustrate Cross-Area Transfer Credit

Decatur State Winder State Moultrie State
Area A1 6 hours 6 hours 6 hours
Area A2 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours
Area B 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours
Area C 12 hours 9 hours 9 hours
Area D 9 hours 12 hours 9 hours
Area E 9 hours 9 hours 12 hours
Total 42 hours 42 hours 42 hours

A student transferring from Decatur State to Winder State having completed the Decatur State core must be given credit in Area D (Natural Science) for the 3 excess hours of work done in Area C (Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics). If a student took 12 hours of Area E (Social Science) courses at Decatur State, only nine of those hours would transfer to Winder State but all 12 would transfer to Moultrie State.

Students successfully completing a course in one institution’s Area F will receive full credit for the course upon transferring to another USG institution as long as the student retains the same major.

Receiving institutions may require transfer students to complete the requirements as specified for native students. However, the total number of hours required of transfer students for the degree must not exceed the number of hours required of native students for the same major.

Students who wish to take Area A–F courses (including distance learning courses) from a USG institution other than the home institution, either concurrently or intermittently, may receive transient permission to take and receive credit for Areas A–F courses satisfying home institution Area A–F requirements.

Provided that native and transfer students are treated equally, institutions may impose additional reasonable expectations, such as a grade of “C” in Area A–F courses.

Chief Transfer Officer
Each institution will designate a Chief Transfer Officer (CTO) to facilitate the transfer of students within the USG. The CTO must have senior administrative and/or faculty status. The CTO is the contact person for students, faculty, advisors, records and admissions personnel, and academic administrators when problems related to transfer of Area A–F course work across USG institutions occur. However, CTOs should also be proactive and work to develop institutional procedures that minimize transfer problems.

Students with questions or concerns about the transfer of credit between USG institutions should contact the CTO at the receiving institution.

Chief Transfer Officers


2.4.10 Common Course Prefixes, Numbers, and Descriptions

(Last Modified July 1, 2021)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
MEMORANDA FROM SENIOR VICE CHANCELLOR FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS, 5/2/1997; 5/23/1997; 6/3/1997; 6/30/1997; AND 11/19/1997 (APPROVED 6/1/1997, FOR IMPLEMENTATION WITH SEMESTER CONVERSION)

Following are common course prefixes, numbers, and descriptions that all institutions shall use for their programs of study.

Course Prefix and NumberCourse NameCourse Description
ACCT 2101Principles of Accounting IA study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts.
ACCT 2102Principles of Accounting IIA study of the underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts.
ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology  
ANTH 1103 Introduction to Social Anthropology  
ANTH 1104 Introduction to Archaeology  
ANTH 1105 Introduction to Physical Anthropology  
ANTH 1106 Introduction to Cultural Diversity  
ARAB 1001 Elementary Arabic I
ARAB 1002 Elementary Arabic II
ARAB 2001 Intermediate Arabic I
ARAB 2002 Intermediate Arabic II
ART The Visual Art Common Prefix for Area C and Area F courses is ART (with the fourth letter being an institutional prerogative).  
ART 1010 Drawing I Introduction to the techniques, materials and principles of drawing.
ART 1011 Drawing II Techniques, materials and principles of drawing.
ART 1020 Two Dimensional Design The fundamentals of two dimensional design introduced through projects in a variety of media.
ART 1030 Three Dimensional Design An investigation of three dimensional forms and space using various materials and methods.
ASTR 1000 Introduction to the UniverseA survey of the universe, examining the historical origins of astronomy; the motions and physical properties of the Sun, Moon, and planets; the formation, evolution, and death of stars; and the structure of galaxies and the expansion of the universe.
ASTR 1010 Astronomy of the Solar SystemAstronomy from early ideas of the cosmos to modern observational techniques. The solar system planets, satellites, and minor bodies. The origin and evolution of the solar system.
ASTR 1020 Stellar and Galactic AstronomyThe study of the Sun and stars, their physical properties and evolution, interstellar matter, star clusters, our galaxy and other galaxies, and the origin and evolution of the Universe.
ATSC 1112Understanding the WeatherThis course explains the basic processes which control and influence atmospheric conditions, both on a local and global scale. The course will address the composition, origin, and structure of the atmosphere, earth-sun relationships, the atmosphere and energy, atmospheric moisture and state changes in water, air pressure and atmospheric circulation, fog, clouds, air masses, air pollution, climate and climate change, atmospheric optics, and the interaction of all these physical phenomena to produce the weather we experience on our planet. [This course is an alternative version of GEOG 1112.]
ATSC 1112LUnderstanding the Weather LabThis course is the lab component of ATSC 1112 Understanding the Weather. Lab exercises cover geographic coordinate systems and maps, temperature and pressure changes in Earth’s atmosphere, interactions between solar radiation and the Earth, factors which control temperature, daily and annual changes in temperature and precipitation, atmospheric moisture and humidity, formation of clouds, utilization of data charts in understanding and predicting weather conditions, and construction and utilization of weather maps. Additionally, the course will introduce the various instruments used in meteorology: thermometers, barometers, psychrometers, and anemometers.
BiologyFor science courses in biology, chemistry, and physics, the sequences designed for non-science majors will be entitled “Introductory Biology, Introductory Chemistry, and Introductory Physics.”
The sequences designed for science majors will be entitled “Principles of Biology, Principles of Chemistry, and Principles of Physics.”
Combined lecture/lab courses should be indicated with a “K” suffix, and stand-alone lab courses should be indicated with an “L” suffix. The approved course descriptions shown for chemistry illustrate the use of the suffixes.
The Principles of Biology sequence will be numbered BIOL 1107 and 1108 (or BIOL 2107 and 2108 for institutions offering the courses in the second year).
BIOL 1107 or 2107 Principles of Biology I Lecture part of a sequence designed for science majors. Use 1107 if course is offered in first year, 2107 if course is offered in second year at an institution.
BIOL 1107K or 2107K Principles of Biology I Part of a sequence designed for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement lecture material. Use 1107K if course is offered in first year, 2107K if course is offered in second year at an institution.
BIOL 1107L or 2107L Principles of Biology I Laboratory Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of BIOL 1107. Use 1107L if course is offered in first year, 2107L if course is offered in second year at an institution.
BIOL 1108 or 2018 Principles of Biology II Lecture part of a sequence designed for science majors. Use 1108 if course is offered in first year, 2108 if course is offered in second year at an institution.
BIOL 1108K or 2108K Principles of Biology II Part of a sequence designed for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement lecture material. Use 1108K if course is offered in first year, 2108K if course is offered in second year at an institution.
BIOL 1108L or 2108L Principles of Biology II Laboratory Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material of BIOL 1108. Use 1108L if course is offered in first year, 2108L if course is offered in second year at an institution.
BUSA 1105 Introduction to Business An integrative study of the functional areas of business (finance, operations, marketing, human resources, etc.)
BUSA 2105 Communicating in the Business Environment A course emphasizing both interpersonal and organizational communications; to include written and oral exercises appropriate to business practice.
BUSA 2106 The Environment of Business An introduction to the legal, regulatory, political, social, ethical, cultural environmental and technological issues which form the context for business; to include an overview of the impact and demographic diversity on organizations.
Chemistry For science courses in biology, chemistry, and physics, the sequences designed for non-science majors will be entitled “Introductory Biology, Introductory Chemistry, and Introductory Physics.”
The sequences designed for science majors will be entitled “Principles of Biology, Principles of Chemistry, and Principles of Physics.”
Combined lecture/lab courses should be indicated with a “K” suffix, and stand-alone lab courses should be indicated with an “L” suffix.
CHEM 1100 Introductory Chemistry A one-semester course covering basic concepts and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. There is no laboratory component.
CHEM 1101 Introductory Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. Topics to be covered include atomic structure and isotopes, periodicity and chemical equations.
CHEM 1101K Introductory Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. Topics to be covered include atomic structure and isotopes, periodicity and chemical equations. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1101L Introductory Chemistry I Laboratory Laboratory exercises designed to supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1101.
CHEM 1102 Introductory Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors.
CHEM 1102K Introductory Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1102L Introductory Chemistry II Laboratory Laboratory exercises designed to supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1102.
CHEM 1151 Survey of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Topics to be covered include elements and compounds, chemical equations, nomenclature, and molecular geometry.
CHEM 1151K Survey of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Topics to be covered include elements and compounds, chemical equations, nomenclature, and molecular geometry. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1151L Survey of Chemistry Laboratory I Laboratory exercises designed to supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1151.
CHEM 1152 Survey of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors.
CHEM 1152K Survey of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1152L Survey of Chemistry Laboratory II Laboratory exercises designed to supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1152.
CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature.
CHEM 1211K Principles of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1211L Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I Laboratory exercises designed to supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1211.
CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors.
CHEM 1212KPrinciples of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1212L Principles of Chemistry Laboratory II Laboratory exercises designed to supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1212.
CHIN 1001 Elementary Chinese I
CHIN 1002 Elementary Chinese II
CHIN 2001 Intermediate Chinese I
CHIN 2002 Intermediate Chinese II
COMM 1100 Human Communication A broad approach to oral communication skills including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and public speaking
COMM 1110 Public Speaking The organization of materials and the vocal and physical aspects of delivery in various speaking situations.
CSCI 1301 Computer Science I The course includes an overview of computers and programming; problem solving and algorithm development; simple data types; arithmetic and logic operators; selection structures; repetition structures; text files; arrays (one-and-two-dimensional); procedural abstraction and software design; modular programming (including subprograms or the equivalent).
CSCI 1302 Computer Science II The course includes an overview of abstract data types (ADTs); arrays (multi-dimensional) and records; sets and strings; binary files; searching and sorting; introductory algorithm analysis (including Big-O); recursion; pointers and linked lists; software engineering concepts; dynamic data structures (stacks, queues, trees).
DATA 1501 Introduction to Data Science This course is intended to provide an introduction into the field of Data Science. Students will develop skills in appropriate technology and basic statistical methods by completing hands-on projects focused on real-world data and addresses the social consequences of data analysis and application. Link to course outline. This is a templated course.
ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies.
ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze structure and performance of the market economy.
EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical & Contemporary Issues in Education This course engages students in observations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Students will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Students will actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, students will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture and examine the moral and ethical responsibilities of teaching in a democracy.
EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Diversity in Educational ContextsGiven the rapidly changing demographics in our state and country, this course is designed to equip future teachers with the fundamental knowledge of understanding culture and teaching children from diverse backgrounds. Specifically, this course is designed to examine 1) the nature and function of culture; 2) the development of individual and group cultural identity; 3) definitions and implications of diversity, and 4) the influences of culture on learning, development, and pedagogy.
EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning & TeachingExplore key aspects of learning and teaching through examining your own learning processes and those of others, with the goal of applying your knowledge to enhance the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts.
ENGL 0999 Support for English Composition This Learning Support course provides corequisite support in reading and writing for students enrolled in ENGL 1101 – English Composition I. Topics will parallel those being studied in ENGL 1101 and the course will provide support for the essential reading and writing skills needed to be successful in ENGL 1101. Taken with ENGL 1101, this is a composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills.
ENGL 1101 English Composition I A composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills.
ENGL 1102 English Composition II A composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101, that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods.
ENGL 2110 World Literature (one course only) A survey of important works of world literature.
ENGL 2111 World Literature I (as part of a two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid-seventeenth century.
ENGL 2112 World Literature II (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of world literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present.
ENGL 2120 British Literature (one course only) A survey of important works of British literature.
ENGL 2121 British Literature I (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of British literature from the Old English period through the neoclassical age.
ENGL 2122 British Literature II (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of important works of British literature from the Romantic era to the present.
ENGL 2130 American Literature (one course only) A survey of important works of American literature.
ENGL 2131 American Literature I (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of American literature from the pre colonial age to the mid-nineteenth century.
ENGL 2132 American Literature II (as part of two-course sequence or option) A survey of American literature from the mid nineteenth century to the present.
ENGL 2140 African American Literature (one course only) Survey of important works of African American literature.
ENGL 2141 African American Literature I (as part of two-course sequence or option) Survey of important works of African American literature, from its beginnings to the Harlem Renaissance.
ENGL 2142 African American Literature II (as part of two-course sequence or option) Survey of important works of African American literature, from the Harlem Renaissance to contemporary time.
FARS 1001 Elementary Farsi I
FARS 1002 Elementary Farsi II
FARS 2001 Intermediate Farsi I
FARS 2002 Intermediate Farsi II
Foreign Language Courses (Generic specifications)
____ 1001 1st semester elementary course (This course will not meet degree requirements at some USG institutions.)
____ 1002 2nd semester elementary course
____ 2001 1st semester intermediate course
____ 2002 2nd semester intermediate course
FREN 1001 Elementary French I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French and to the culture of French-speaking regions.
FREN 1002 Elementary French II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in French with further study of the culture of French-speaking regions.
FREN 2001 Intermediate French I
FREN 2002 Intermediate French II
GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography A survey of global patterns of resources, population, culture, and economic systems. Emphasis is placed upon the factors contributing to these patterns and the distinctions between the technologically advanced and less advanced regions of the world.
GEOG 1103 Geographic Perspectives on Multiculturalism in the U.S. Geographic factors underlying multiculturalism and ethnic relationships in the United States. Three interrelated themes are emphasized: the spatial development and organization of culture; population growth, migration, and urbanization; and the spatial dimensions of political, economic, and social processes.
GEOG 1111 Introduction to Physical Geography (Earth Science Survey) An introduction to physical geography, surveying climate, vegetation, soils, landforms, and water resources in their areal interrelations and distributions.
GEOG 1112 Introduction to Weather and Climate
(3 credits lecture, 1 credit for optional lab, or 4 credits if combined)
Components of weather processes, and their measurement. Climatic elements and their control factors. Geographic classification of climatic and vegetative types on the Earth’s surface. [May also be offered as ATSC 1112.]
GEOG 1113 Introduction to Landforms (3 credits lecture, 1 credit for optional lab, or 4 credits if combined) Introductory analysis and classification of major types of land surfaces, stressing geographic characteristics. Study and interpretation of relationships between landforms and other phenomena through maps, air photos, and field observations. World coverage with stress on North America.
GEOG 1125 Resources, Society, and the Environment Interactions between physical systems and human activities, and their effects on environmental quality and sustainability are emphasized. Topics include: geography of population and resource consumption, food production, water and air quality, energy policy, land/biotic resource management. Contrasting social, ethical, and technological perspectives on environmental concerns are explored.
GEOL 1121 Introductory Geosciences I (institutional option name, such as Physical Geology) This course covers Earth materials and processes.
GEOL 1122 Introductory Geosciences II (institutional option name, such as Historical Geology) This course covers geologic time, sedimentary environments, fossils, and Earth history.
GRMN 1001 Elementary German I An introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Beginning of a survey of basic German grammar and the grammar and the development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Some aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. [INSTITUTIONAL OPTION: Work with other media (audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.]
GRMN 1002 Elementary German II The second part of an introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Completion of the survey of basic German grammar and further development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. [INSTITUTIONAL OPTION: Work with other media(audio, video, and/or computer) outside of class is required.]
GRMN 2001 Intermediate German I
GRMN 2002 Intermediate German II
GREK 1001 Elementary Greek Introduction to the grammar, reading, and translation of Classical Attic Greek.
GREK 1002 Elementary Greek II Continued study of the grammar of Classical Attic Greek begun in GREK 1001, with further reading and translation.
GREK 2001 Intermediate Greek I
GREK 2002 Intermediate Greek II
HEBR 1001 Elementary Hebrew I
HEBR 1002 Elementary Hebrew II
HEBR 2001 Intermediate Hebrew I
HEBR 2002 Intermediate Hebrew II
HIST 1011 Survey of World History/Civilization I A survey of World History to the post-classical period. (Three-semester version)
HIST 1012 Survey of World History/Civilization II A survey of World History from the post-classical to early modern times. (Three-semester version)
HIST 1013 Survey of World History/Civilization III A survey of World History from early modern times to the present. (Three-semester version)
HIST 1021 Survey of Western Civilization I A survey of Western Civilization to the medieval period. (Three-semester version)
HIST 1022 Survey of Western Civilization II A survey of Western Civilization from medieval to early modern times. (Three-semester version)
HIST 1023 Survey of Western Civilization III A survey of Western Civilization from early modern times to the present. (Three-semester version)
HIST 1100Survey of World History/Civilization A thematic survey of World History to the present era. (One-semester version)
HIST 1111 Survey of World History/Civilization I A survey of World History to early modern times. (Two-semester version)
HIST 1112 Survey of World History/Civilization II A survey of World History from early modern times to the present. (Two-semester version)
HIST 1120 Survey of Western Civilization A thematic survey of Western Civilization to the present. (One-semester version)
HIST 1121 Survey of Western Civilization I A survey of Western Civilization to early modern times. (Two-semester version)
HIST 1122 Survey of Western Civilization II A survey of Western Civilization from early modern times to the present. (Two-semester version)
HIST 2110 Survey of U.S. History A thematic survey of U.S. History to the present. (One-semester version)
HIST 2111 Survey of U.S. History I A survey of U.S. History to the post-Civil War period. (Two-semester version)
HIST 2112 Survey of U.S. History II A survey of U.S. History from the post-Civil War period to the present. (Two-semester version)
ITAL 1001 Elementary Italian I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing in Italian and to the culture of Italian-speaking regions.
ITAL 1002 Elementary Italian II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in Italian with further study of the culture of Italian-speaking regions.
ITAL 2001 Intermediate Italian I
ITAL 2002 Intermediate Italian II
JAPN 1001 Elementary Japanese I
JAPN 1002 Elementary Japanese II
JAPN 2001 Intermediate Japanese I
JAPN 2002 Intermediate Japanese II
LATN 1001 Elementary Latin I Introduction to the Latin language: pronunciation, fundamentals of grammar, reading, and translation.
LATN 1002 Elementary Latin II Continued study of Latin grammar and syntax begun in LATN 1001, with further reading and translation.
LATN 2001 Intermediate Latin I
LATN 2002 Intermediate Latin II
MATH 0996 Support for Elementary Statistics This Learning Support course provides corequisite support for students enrolled in MATH or STAT 1401 – Elementary Statistics. Topics will parallel topics being studied in MATH/STAT 1401 and the course will provide support for the essential skills needed to be successful in MATH/STAT 1401. Taken with MATH/STAT 1401, topics to be covered will include descriptive statistics, probability theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and other selected statistics topics.
MATH 0997 Support for Quantitative Reasoning This Learning Support course provides corequisite support in mathematics for students enrolled in MATH 1001 – Quantitative Reasoning. Topics will parallel topics being studied in MATH 1001 and the course will provide support for the essential quantitative skills needed to be successful in MATH 1001. Taken with MATH 1001, topics to be covered will include logic, basic probability, data analysis and modeling from data.
MATH 0998 Support for Mathematical Modeling This Learning Support course provides corequisite support in mathematics for students enrolled in MATH 1101 – Introduction to Mathematical Modeling. Topics will parallel topics being studied in MATH 1101 and the course will provide support for essential quantitative skills needed to be successful in MATH 1101. Taken with MATH 1101, this course is an introduction to mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. Emphasis is on the use of elementary functions to investigate and analyze applied problems and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communication of quantitative concepts and results.
MATH 0999 Support for College Algebra This Learning Support course provides corequisite support in mathematics for students enrolled in MATH 1111 – College Algebra. Topics will parallel topics being studied in MATH 1111 and the course will provide support for the essential quantitative skills needed to be successful in MATH 1111. Taken with MATH 1111, this course provides an in-depth study of the properties of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions as needed for calculus. Emphasis is on using algebraic and graphical techniques for solving problems involving linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions.
MATH 1001 Quantitative Reasoning This course emphasizes quantitative reasoning skills needed for informed citizens to understand the world around them. Topics include logic, basic probability, data analysis and modeling from data.
MATH 1101 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling This course is an introduction to mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. Emphasis is on the use of elementary functions to investigate and analyze applied problems and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communication of quantitative concepts and results.
MATH 1111 College Algebra This course provides an in-depth study of the properties of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions as needed for calculus. Emphasis is on using algebraic and graphical techniques for solving problems involving linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions.
MATH 1112 College Trigonometry This course is an in-depth study of the properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses. Topics include circular functions, special angles, solutions of triangles, trigonometric identities and equations, graphs of trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, and vectors.
MATH 1113 Pre-calculus This course is an intensive study of the basic functions needed for the study of calculus. Topics include algebraic, functional, and graphical techniques for solving problems with algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their inverses.
MATH 1401 or STAT 1401 Elementary Statistics This is a non-calculus based introduction to statistics. Course content includes descriptive statistics, probability theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and other selected statistical topics.
MATH 2401 or STAT 2401 Elementary Statistics II
MUSC 1100 Music Appreciation (or equivalent) Introduction to Music History and literature.
MUSC 1080 Band (or equivalent) Study, rehearsal, and concert performance or literature for band.
MUSC 1090 Choir (or equivalent) Study, rehearsal, and concert performance of literature for choir.
MUSC 2080 Band (or equivalent) Study, rehearsal, and concert performance or literature for band.
MUSC 2090 Choir (or equivalent) Study, rehearsal, and concert performance of literature for choir.
NORW 1001 Elementary Norwegian I
NORW 1002 Elementary Norwegian II
NORW 2001 Intermediate Norwegian I
NORW 2002 Intermediate Norwegian II
PHIL 1010 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 2 credit-hour critical thinking courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2010 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit introduction to philosophy courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2020 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hours critical thinking courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2030 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hour introduction to ethics courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2040 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hour introduction to philosophy of art courses. Specific course description not specified.
PHIL 2500 Specific course name not specified but this number is to be used for 3 credit hour symbolic logic courses. Specific course description not specified.
Physical Science PHSC or PHYS is the recommended prefix for common physical science courses that are developed. To date, there are no common physical science courses.
Combined lecture/lab courses should be indicated with a “K” suffix, and stand-alone lab courses should be indicated with an “L” suffix. The approved course descriptions shown for chemistry illustrate the use of the suffixes.
PHSC 1011 Physical Science I Physical science lecture. Same as PHYS 1011.
PHSC 1011K Physical Science I Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Same as PHYS 1011K.
PHSC 1011L Physical Science I Laboratory Laboratory exercises designed to supplement the lecture material of PHSC 1011. Same as PHYS 1011L.
PHSC 1012 Physical Science II Physical science lecture. Same as PHYS 1012.
PHSC 1012K Physical Science II Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Same as PHYS 1012K.
PHSC 1012L Physical Science II Laboratory Laboratory exercises designed to supplement the lecture material of PHSC 1012. Same as PHYS 1012L.
PHYS 1011 Physical Science I Physical science lecture. Same as PHSC 1011.
PHYS 1011K Physical Science I Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Same as PHSC 1011K.
PHYS 1011L Physical Science I Laboratory I Laboratory exercises designed to supplement the lecture material of PHYS 1011. Same as PHSC 1011L.
PHYS 1012 Physical Science II Physical science lecture. Same as PHSC 1012.
PHYS 1012K Physical Science II Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Same as PHSC 1012K.
PHYS 1012L Physical Science II Laboratory I Laboratory exercises designed to supplement the lecture material of PHYS 1012. Same as PHSC 1012L.
Physics For science courses in biology, chemistry, and physics, the sequences designed for non-science majors will be entitled “Introductory Biology, Introductory Chemistry, and Introductory Physics.”
The sequences designed for science majors will be entitled “Principles of Biology, Principles of Chemistry, and Principles of Physics”.
Combined lecture/lab courses should be indicated with a “K” suffix, and stand-alone lab courses should be indicated with an “L” suffix. The approved course descriptions shown for chemistry illustrate the use of the suffixes.
PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I An introductory course which will include mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, and rotational motion and statics), and may also include thermodynamics and waves. Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used.
PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II An introductory course which will include electrostatics, electric current and circuits, and electromagnetism, and may also include optics and modern physics, Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used.
PHYS 1211 or 2211 Principles of Physics I (1000 or 2000 level to be specified by institution) An introductory course which will include mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, and rotational motion and statics), and may also include thermodynamics and waves. Elementary calculus will be used.
PHYS 1212 or 2212 Principles of Physics II (level 1 or 2 to be specified by institution) An introductory course which will include electrostatics, electric current and circuits, and electromagnetism, and may also include optics and modern physics. Elementary calculus will be used.
POLS 1101 American Government
POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science
POLS 2201 State and Local Government
POLS 2301 Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLS 2401 Global Issues
POLS 2501 Domestic Issues
POLS 2601 Introduction to Public Administration
PORT 1001 Elementary Portuguese I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing Portuguese and to the culture of Portuguese-speaking regions.
PORT 1002 Elementary Portuguese II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in Portuguese with further study of the culture of Portuguese-speaking regions.
PORT 2001 Intermediate Portuguese I
PORT 2002 Intermediate Portuguese II
PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology (Institutional option for name addendum - e.g. Principles I) A broad survey of the major topics in psychology including, but not limited to, research methodology, biological and social factors influencing behavior, development, learning, memory, personality, and abnormal.
PSYC 2101 Introduction to the Psychology of Adjustment (Institutional option for name addendum) An introductory examination of the applied psychological theory and research concerning mental health and well being.
PSYC 2103 Introduction to Human Development (Institutional option for name addendum) An introductory, non-laboratory based examination of human development across the lifespan with an emphasis on normal patterns of physical, cognitive, and social development.
RUSS 1001 Elementary Russian I
RUSS 1002 Elementary Russian II
RUSS 2001 Intermediate Russian I
RUSS 2002 Intermediate Russian II
SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology A survey of the discipline of sociology. Topics will include sociological theory, methods and selected substantive area.
SOCI 1160 Introduction to Social Problems A theoretical and empirical analysis of selected major social problems confronting American society.
SOCI 2293 Introduction to Marriage and Family An introduction to the structure, processes, problems and adjustments of contemporary marriage and family life.
SPAN 1001 Elementary Spanish I Introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish and to the culture of Spanish-speaking regions.
SPAN 1002 Elementary Spanish II Continued listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish with further study of the culture of Spanish-speaking regions.
SPAN 2001 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN 2002 Intermediate Spanish II
STAT 0996 Support for Elementary Statistics This Learning Support course provides corequisite support for students enrolled in MATH or STAT 1401 – Elementary Statistics. Topics will parallel topics being studied in MATH/STAT 1401 and the course will provide support for the essential skills needed to be successful in MATH/STAT 1401. Taken with MATH/STAT 1401, topics to be covered will include descriptive statistics, probability theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and other selected statistics topics.
STAT 1401 or MATH 1401 Elementary Statistics This is a non-calculus based introduction to statistics. Course content includes descriptive statistics, probability theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and other selected statistical topics.
STAT 2401 or MATH 2401 Elementary Statistics II
THEA 1100 Theatre Appreciation Survey and critical appreciation of Theatre.
YORU 1001 Elementary Yoruba I
YORU 1002 Elementary Yoruba II
YORU 2001 Intermediate Yoruba I
YORU 2002 Intermediate Yoruba II

(Last Modified October 12, 2020)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.5, GRADING SYSTEM

The BoR Policy Manual identifies official grades approved for use by institutions.

2.5.1 Academic Renewal

(Last Modified September 28, 2020)   Report a broken link

Last reviewed: January 2010

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 3.5.3, Grade Point Average Upon Academic Renewal
EFFECTIVE DATE: JUNE 1995, UPDATED 5/24/2000 Revised 4/2015, 11/2018

Definition of Terms for the Purpose of These Procedures

Academic Renewal: A provision which allows USG degree-seeking students who earlier experienced academic difficulty to make a fresh start and have one final opportunity to earn an associate or bachelor’s degree. Students receiving academic renewal receive a new grade point average to be used for determining academic standing.

Required Minimum Period of Absence or Period of Absence: The minimum period of time a student must be absent from an institution before returning to be eligible for consideration for Academic Renewal at that institution. Each USG institution determines the required Period of Absence for academic renewal eligibility at that institution. The minimum period of absence set by an institution must be no less than three years and no longer than five years.

  1. Applying for Academic Renewal
    1. Degree-seeking undergraduate students may apply for Academic Renewal at the time of enrollment or reenrollment at a USG institution. Select USG institutions will permit applicants to apply for Academic Renewal at the time of admissions or readmissions.
    2. Institutions must set a maximum period of time for students to apply for Academic Renewal upon admission, enrolling or reenrolling at the institution. The maximum period of time set by the institution may not be less than one calendar year.
    3. Each USG institution shall establish the policies and procedures for the submission of applications for Academic Renewal to that institution.
  2. Eligibility for Academic Renewal
    1. Only undergraduate degree-seeking students may be eligible for Academic Renewal.
    2. A student shall only be granted Academic Renewal one time in the University System.
    3. Students may be eligible for Academic Renewal as either a student readmitted to a previously attended USG institution or as a student transferring to a USG institution.
      1. Readmitted Students
        1. Undergraduate students who return to a previously attended USG institution may be eligible for Academic Renewal.
        2. Readmitted students must be absent from the institution to which they are returning for a minimum period of time called the Required Minimum Period of Absence or Period of Absence.
        3. Each USG institution shall set the Period of Absence students must meet to be considered for Academic Renewal upon returning to that institution. The Period of Absence shall be set by the institution at no less than three years and no more than five years.
        4. The Period of Absence is calculated based on the period of time between the date of last enrollment at the institution and the date of return to the institution.
        5. Only coursework completed prior to the Period of Absence may be considered for Academic Renewal. If Academic Renewal is granted, all coursework completed prior to the Period of Absence will be renewed.
        6. Students may attend other institutions during the Period of Absence; however, that coursework will not be eligible for Academic Renewal. Transfer credit for any coursework taken during the Period of Absence shall be granted in accordance with the prevailing USG and institutional policies and procedures regarding the awarding of transfer credit.
      2. Transfer Students
        1. Students who previously attended a USG institution or any regionally-accredited institution of higher education and transfer to a USG institution may be eligible for Academic Renewal for coursework taken prior to the period of time equal to the Period of Absence set by the institution in their Academic Renewal procedures for readmitted students.
        2. If Academic Renewal is granted, all coursework completed prior to the period of time equal to the Required Minimum Period of Absence will be renewed.
        3. Courses taken during the period of time equal to the Required Period of Absence are ineligible for consideration for Academic Renewal. Transfer credit for any coursework taken during that period of time shall be granted in accordance with the prevailing USG and institutional policies and procedures regarding the awarding of transfer credit. Retained grades are not calculated in a Renewal GPA. Such credit is considered in the same context as transfer credit, credit by examination, and courses with grades of “S.”
    4. Each USG institution shall establish the criteria and procedures for the evaluation, approval, denial and re-application for Academic Renewal for their institution.
  3. Academic Renewal and Admissions
    1. At their discretion, institutions may elect to allow applicants to apply for Academic Renewal at the time of admissions or readmissions. Those institutions electing to grant academic renewal during the admission process should omit the renewed coursework from consideration when evaluating an applicant’s eligibility for admission to the institution.
    2. Receiving Academic Renewal does not guarantee admission or readmission to an institution. All students, including those granted Academic Renewal, must meet BOR and institution admission requirements.
    3. The granting of Academic Renewal does not supersede the admissions requirements of certain programs, e.g., teacher education and nursing, which require a specific minimum grade point average based upon all coursework.
  4. Impact of Academic Renewal on GPA, Academic Credit Earned, Financial Aid Eligibility
    1. If a student with Academic Renewal is admitted or readmitted to a USG institution, the institution shall honor the Academic Renewal granted at another USG institution such that the coursework for which Academic Renewal has been granted at one institution shall also be granted Academic Renewal at any other USG institution subsequently attended.
    2. All previously attempted courses, including those for which Academic Renewal has been granted, shall be recorded on the student’s official transcript.
    3. An Academic Renewal GPA is calculated when the student resumes taking coursework following approval for Academic Renewal.
    4. Coursework taken within the Period of Absence is not eligible for renewal but transfer credit for any coursework taken during that period of time shall be granted in accordance with the prevailing USG and institutional policies and procedures regarding the awarding of transfer credit.
    5. The Academic Renewal GPA will be used for determining academic standing and eligibility for graduation.
      1. Students are still expected to meet residency requirements (the number of credit hours that must be earned at the degree awarding institution) after acquiring Academic Renewal status. Renewed courses do not count towards the institutional residency requirement.
      2. Institutions will determine the eligibility for honors at graduation for those students granted Academic Renewal status based on their institution policies regarding honors graduation.
    6. Academic credit for previously completed coursework will be retained only for courses in which a grade of “A”, “B” or “C” has been earned.
      1. Retained grades are not calculated in an Academic Renewal GPA. Such credit is considered in the same context as transfer credit, credit by examination, and courses with grades of “S”.
      2. Courses with grades of “D” or “F” must be repeated if they are required in the student’s degree program.
      3. Institutions shall accept transient credits of students with Academic Renewal status per their policies regarding the acceptance of such credit.
    7. Applicability of retained credit to degree requirements will be determined by the degree requirements in effect at the time Academic Renewal status is conferred on the student. Specific institutional program regulations must also be met.
    8. Scholastic suspensions that occurred in the past shall remain recorded on the student’s permanent record. If a suspension (either first or second) is on the record and the student encounters subsequent academic difficulty after having been granted Academic Renewal, the student may be subject to suspension or dismissal per the institution’s academic standing policy.
    9. The granting of Academic Renewal does not supersede financial aid policies regarding Satisfactory Academic Progress.
  5. Documenting Academic Renewal in Student Records
    1. Institutions that grant Academic Renewal must document the renewal on student records as described in the associated business practice.

2.5.2 Withdrawal for Military Service:  Refunds and Grades

(Last Modified January 21, 2010)   Report a broken link

Last reviewed: January 2010

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY 7.3.5.3, MILITARY SERVICE REFUNDS

The following administrative guidelines are established for implementation of this action:

  • Students must officially withdraw and present official orders to qualify for refunds of tuition and fees.
  • Elective fees are pro rated according to the date that the student officially withdraws.
  • A student who withdraws and receives a full tuition refund will receive a grade of “WM,” military withdrawal, for all courses. A grade of WM entails no penalties that would ordinarily apply for federal or state aid. For example, the student does not have to pay back money already spent for books and fees, and a WM does not count against attempted hours for HOPE.
  • Requests for exceptional relief are made directly to the president of the institution. The president will make a determination on each request expeditiously.

(Last Modified October 13, 2020)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.8, DEGREES

2.6.1 Degrees, General

(Last Modified January 21, 2010)   Report a broken link

Last reviewed: January 2010

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.8.1, DEGREES, GENERAL

A bachelor’s degree may not exceed 120 hours, exclusive of physical education activity/basic health or orientation course hours that the institution may require unless approved by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.


2.6.2 Graduate Degrees

(Last Modified September 3, 2021)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.8.5, MASTER DEGREES

A master’s degree may not exceed 30 hours unless approved by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.


(Last Modified October 12, 2020)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.9, ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT

Each institution shall follow these general guidelines in establishing their academic advising program:

  • Each institution shall establish academic advising procedures within the academic units that comprise the college or university.
  • These academic advising procedures shall have baseline minimal uniformity in application and simultaneously be tailored to the specific needs of individual students.
  • Each institution shall establish training sessions associated with academic advising such that faculty advisors are aware of the rules and regulations associated with the core curriculum, academic transfer, student status, and grading policies.
  • Institutions that have advising units outside of academic units will be responsible for keeping abreast of changes in academic curricula and requirements as stipulated by the institution and individual academic units.
  • Student appeals concerning academic advising will follow the institutional appeals process.

2.7.1 Minority Advising Program

(Last Modified November 5, 2019)   Report a broken link

This section has been removed because this program is no longer active.


(Last Modified June 22, 2020)   Report a broken link

This section has been removed. The Regents’ Test is no longer offered in the University System of Georgia.

2.9.1 Administrative Procedures for Learning Support Programs

(Last Modified October 1, 2020)   Report a broken link

Last reviewed: February 2019

Learning Support is a generic term for programs designed to assist students with collegiate work. USG institutions may serve students who fall below USG collegiate placement standards but also have the flexibility to develop more rigorous academic criteria with which their students must comply. Learning Support programs are intended to serve students who need additional support in mathematics or English (reading/writing). Students who may be served within the Learning Support program are:

A. Students who do not meet USG criteria to exempt Learning Support placement.

B. Students who are determined by the institution to need academic assistance even though they are eligible to be admitted without Learning Support requirements under USG policy.

C. Students who elect to enroll in Learning Support courses to gain additional support while they are enrolled in entry-level English and mathematics courses.

2.9.1.1. Organization and Staff

  1. Each institution that accepts students with Learning Support requirements must designate a Learning Support Coordinator. The duties of the Learning Support Coordinator will include, but not be limited to:

    • Serving as a point of contact for the System Office for matters related to Learning Support.
    • Ensuring that appropriate corequisite Learning Support courses are provided for all admitted students requiring Learning Support.
    • Coordinating with institutional admissions, testing centers, and academic departments as needed regarding placement, and ensuring that all students are appropriately placed.
    • Ensuring that Learning Support placement and progress are accurately flagged and tracked in Banner.
    • Ensuring that the fundamental features of corequisite Learning Support are fully implemented at the institution.
    • Ensuring that corequisite Learning Support courses are carefully and appropriately coordinated with the college level courses they are intended to support.
    • Providing or coordinating training of institutional faculty, staff, and administrators as needed to ensure appropriate implementation of the corequisite Learning Support model.
  2. Institutions must have appropriate faculty or staff members who are responsible for determining appropriate placement and instruction of students enrolled in Learning Support courses.

  3. The record of each student’s Learning Support course work, including courses taken and grades earned will be maintained in a USG-approved format by the registrar as part of each student’s academic record.

  4. Each institution shall develop a set of procedures for its Learning Support programs. These procedures will include guidelines for implementing Board of Regents policy and administrative procedures and USG test administration guidelines as well as additional institutional policies and procedures. Such procedures shall be approved by the Chief Academic Officer and the President. The Chief Academic Officer of each institution will provide written notification to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG that the institutional procedures are consistent with Board Policy and Procedures.

  5. All USG institutions that accept students requiring Learning Support will provide Learning Support exclusively in accordance with USG rules regarding Learning Support program operation (ASAH 2.9.1-2.9.3).

2.9.1.2. Evaluation for Learning Support Placement

The “default placement” for all students will be in entry-level collegiate English and mathematics with corequisite Learning Support unless the exemption criteria outlined below are met.

  • Students who do not meet any exemption criteria may waive placement testing if they are willing to accept placement in corequisite Learning Support at the highest level of credit intensity offered at the institution.
  • All students must be made aware that they have the OPTION to take placement tests, which may place them directly into collegiate courses or in less credit-intensive levels of corequisite Learning Support. Students interested in taking placement tests should not be discouraged from doing so.
  • Exception: students wishing to enroll in MATH 1111 College Algebra, (with or without corequisite Learning Support), must take the mathematics placement test unless they have met the criteria for direct placement into MATH 1111 or MATH 1111 with corequisite Learning Support (see below).

All entering students will be enrolled in ENGL 1101 English Composition I and the corequisite Learning Support course, ENGL 0999 Support for English Composition, unless they meet or exceed one or more of the exemption criteria listed below or are enrolled in a program for which ENGL 1101 is not required. If students enroll in programs that do not require ENGL 1101, but they choose to take this course, standard assessment and placement rules will apply.

All entering students will be enrolled in one of three standard Area A college-level credit bearing mathematics courses (MATH 1001 Quantitative Reasoning, MATH 1101 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling, or MATH 1111 College Algebra) and a corequisite Learning Support course unless they meet one of the exemption criteria listed below or are enrolled in a program for which a mathematics course is not required. If students enroll in programs that do not require a mathematics course, but they choose to take a mathematics course, standard assessment and placement rules will apply.

To exempt placement in corequisite Learning Support students must:

For English (reading/writing): Students must meet or exceed one or more of the criteria listed below. Students must

  • have transferred or transferable credit for an Area A English course (must meet the minimum grade requirement for the institution – which may be a “C” or higher); OR
  • have an English Placement Index (EPI) of 4230 or higher; OR
  • have a High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA) of 3.1 or higher AND have completed the Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) in English; OR
  • score 430 or higher on the SAT (old) Critical Reading; OR
  • score 480 or higher on the SAT (new) Evidence-Based Reading and Writing (EBRW) section; OR
  • score 17 or higher on the ACT English or ACT Reading; OR
  • score 61 or higher on the Classic Accuplacer Reading Comprehension test AND score 4 or higher on the Accuplacer WritePlacer test; OR
  • score 237 or higher on the Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading Comprehension test AND score 4 or higher on the Accuplacer WritePlacer test.

For Mathematics:

Placement in MATH 1111 (College Algebra) without corequisite Learning Support. Students must meet or exceed one or more of the criteria listed below. Students meeting these criteria will also be eligible to enroll in MATH 1001 (Quantitative Reasoning) or MATH 1101 (Introduction to Mathematical Modeling) without corequisite Learning Support. Students must

  • have transferred or transferable credit for an Area A mathematics course (must meet the minimum grade requirement for the institution – which may be a “C” or higher); OR
  • have been placed in pre-calculus or a higher mathematics course (e.g., College Trigonometry or some form of calculus); OR
  • have a High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA) of 3.4 or higher AND have completed the Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) in Mathematics; OR
  • have a Mathematics Placement Index (MPI) of 1265 or higher OR
  • score 470 or higher on the SAT (old) Mathematics; OR
  • score 510 or higher on the SAT (new) Mathematics section; OR
  • score 20 or higher on the ACT Mathematics; OR
  • score 79 or higher on the Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra test; OR
  • score 266 or higher on the Next-Generation Accuplacer Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics test.

Students who do not meet the criteria for placement into MATH 1111 without corequisite Learning Support may meet criteria for placement into MATH 1111 with corequisite Learning Support or MATH 1001 or MATH 1101 without corequisite Learning Support.

For placement into MATH 1111 with corequisite Learning Support or MATH 1001 or MATH 1101 without corequisite Learning Support students must

  • have a High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA) of 3.2 or higher AND have completed the Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) in Mathematics; OR
  • have a Mathematics Placement Index (MPI) of 1165 or higher OR
  • score 400 or higher on the SAT (old) Mathematics; OR
  • score 440 or higher on the SAT (new) Mathematics section; OR
  • score 17 or higher on the ACT Mathematics; OR
  • score 67 or higher on the Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra test; OR
  • score 258 or higher on the Next-Generation Accuplacer Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics test.

Students who do not meet criteria for placement into MATH 1111 with corequisite Learning Support or MATH 1001 or MATH 1101 without corequisite Learning Support will be placed in MATH 1001 or MATH 1101 with corequisite Learning Support.

Students wishing to take MATH 1111 who do not receive initial placement into MATH 1111 with or without Learning Support must take MATH 1001 or MATH 1101 with or without Learning Support. Upon successful completion of MATH 1001 or 1101 these students will be eligible to enroll in MATH 1111 without corequisite Learning Support.

Institutions may set higher scores or require additional measures for screening and placement into collegiate courses or into MATH 1111 with corequisite Learning Support.

A Mathematics Placement Index (MPI) and an English Placement Index (EPI) may be calculated based on High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA), SAT or ACT and, when indicated, the Classic Accuplacer placement tests.

For instructions on how to calculate the EPI and the MPI, click here.

USG institutions may accept Accuplacer scores from tests administered by other USG or non-USG institutions or agencies as long as the receiving USG institution has agreed to do so and the scores are transmitted through official secure channels. Transmission of placement test scores may be through official transcript, direct electronic transfer between institutions, e-mail from a verified e-mail address, or fax from a verified fax number.

2.9.1.3. Rules Regarding Learning Support Program Operation

  1. Learning Support courses are to be offered exclusively in “corequisite” format. The corequisite format means that students requiring Learning Support will enroll in both a collegiate course (ENGL 1101, MATH 1001, MATH 1101, or MATH 1111) and a corequisite Learning Support course (ENGL 0999, MATH 0997, MATH 0998, or MATH 0999) that is designed to support mastery of the skills and concepts needed to pass the collegiate course in a “just-in-time” manner. Each corequisite course will be a required course that is aligned with and offered alongside the appropriate college-level course and should be designed specifically to help students master the skills and knowledge required for success in the linked college-level course. The college-level and corequisite sections must be carefully coordinated. In particular, the college-level and corequisite sections must cover the same topics in the same order at the same time.

  2. Courses in the Learning Support program shall include courses in English (reading/writing) and mathematics. Learning Support courses in English and mathematics shall carry course numbers of 0999 or below (see section 2.9.2).

  3. Students who are required to enroll in corequisite Learning Support courses along with collegiate courses must remain enrolled in BOTH courses. Students may not withdraw from either the corequisite Learning Support course or the paired collegiate course without withdrawing from both courses.

  4. Learning Support programs shall coordinate academic advisement of their students to ensure that these students are informed about their requirements.

  5. No degree credit will be earned in Learning Support courses, but institutional credit will be awarded.

  6. The following grades defined in detail in BoR Policy 3.5 are approved for LS courses in English (reading/writing), and mathematics:

    GradeDefinition
    A, B, or C Passing course grade
    F or WF Failing course grade
    I Academic progress satisfactory, but coursework incomplete (may only be awarded if the student also receives an “I” in the paired collegiate course)
    W Withdrawal without penalty
    WM Withdrawal without penalty for military service
    V Student auditing LS course that is not required but taken voluntarily

2.9.1.4. Rules for Students in Learning Support Programs

Satisfaction of Learning Support Requirements

Students will satisfy and exit Learning Support requirements by successfully passing (as defined by the institution) the corresponding Area A collegiate-level course.

Courses with Learning Support Prerequisites or Corequisites

  1. Students who are required to enroll in corequisite Learning Support courses are not permitted to enroll in credit-bearing courses that require mastery of the content or skills of the Learning Support courses as prerequisites.

  2. Institutions shall inform students of collegiate courses that require completion of or exemption from corequisite Learning Support courses. The following core curriculum areas may require students to complete or exempt corequisite Learning Support requirements.
    • Completion or exemption from corequisite Learning Support English may be a prerequisite for Social, Natural, and Physical Science courses. (Additional areas for exit or exemption such as Learning Support Mathematics are at the discretion of the institution.)
    • Placement into or exemption from corequisite Learning Support English is required for placement into ENGL 1101. Completion or exemption from corequisite Learning Support English is required for placement into all other college-level English courses.
    • Placement into or exemption from corequisite Learning Support mathematics is required for placement into MATH 1001, 1101, or 1111. Completion of or exemption from corequisite Learning Support mathematics is required for placement into all other college level mathematics courses.
    • Completion or exemption from corequisite Learning Support mathematics may be a prerequisite for physics and chemistry courses.
    • Any courses with prerequisite a of any other college-level course would require exit or exemption from related Learning Support requirements.
    • It is recommended that courses such as music, art, and drama remain open for students with Learning Support requirements whenever possible.

USG-mandated Enrollment in Learning Support Courses

The following requirements apply to students who have USG-mandated Learning Support requirements.

  1. During each semester of enrollment, students must first register for all required corequisite Learning Support courses and paired collegiate courses before being allowed to register for other courses. This policy also applies to part-time students. Two exceptions are possible:
    • Students requiring Learning Support in both English and mathematics may defer enrollment in corequisite Learning Support and the accompanying collegiate courses in one area, but must be continuously enrolled in one or both until the college-level courses have been passed. In cases where students cannot take courses in both Learning Support areas simultaneously, enrollment in ENGL 1101 with corequisite Learning Support should take priority. All Area A requirements must be completed within the first 30 credit hours, including college-level and corequisite requirements in both English and mathematics.
    • In the event that a required corequisite Learning Support/collegiate course pair is not available, a student may enroll in one or more unrelated courses for degree credit if the student has met the course requirements, subject to the written approval of the President or designee.
  2. Students who have accumulated 30 semester hours of college-level credit and have not successfully completed required Learning Support courses may enroll only in corequisite Learning Support courses and paired collegiate courses until all Area A requirements are successfully completed. Students with transfer credit or credit earned in a certificate or prior degree program who are required to take corequisite Learning Support courses for their current degree objectives may earn up to 30 additional hours of college-level credit. After earning the additional hours, such students may only enroll in corequisite Learning Support courses until all Area A requirements have been completed. Institutions have the authority to limit accumulation of college-level credit without completion of Area A requirements to 20 hours.

Enrollment in Institutionally-Required Learning Support Courses

Students who exceed the USG minimum requirements but are required by the institution to take Learning Support courses may, at the institution’s option, be exempted from any or all of the requirements specified in Section 2.9.1.4 above. However, all such Learning Support requirements imposed by the institution must be satisfied by the time the student has earned 30 semester credit hours or the student must enroll in course work that will satisfy the requirements every semester of enrollment until the requirements are satisfied.

Voluntary Enrollment in Learning Support Courses

Students who are not required to take Learning Support courses in a disciplinary area may elect to enroll in Learning Support courses in a non-required area for institutional credit or on an audit basis.

Learning Support for Transfer Students

Students transferring into a USG institution will be exempt from Learning Support English requirements if they have completed a transferrable Area A English course and will be exempt from Learning Support Mathematics requirements if they have completed a transferrable Area A mathematics course. Otherwise, they will be evaluated for Learning Support/collegiate placement according to the same criteria as other entering students.

Learning Support Rules for Returning Students

Students who return to USG institutions after an absence are subject to the following rules concerning Learning Support.

  • Students who have completed transferable coursework in Area A English or mathematics are exempt from Learning Support requirements in that area.
  • Students who were exempt from Learning Support requirements during their previous attendance period remain exempt from those requirements upon readmission.
  • Students who last attended with outstanding Learning Support requirements will be placed in the appropriate Area A courses with corequisite Learning Support courses upon readmission. Students who do not wish to be placed in Learning Support may opt to be reevaluated or to take a placement test for possible Learning Support exemption.

Students with Special Needs

  1. Students with documented learning disorders as defined in the Academic & Student Affairs Handbook, Section 3.3, who are required to enroll in Learning Support, must fulfill all stated requirements, including placement testing (if needed, Next-Generation Accuplacer or system-approved alternate) and course requirements. General and specific guidelines for documentation of learning disorders appear in Section 3, Appendices D and E. Students will be provided with appropriate testing and/or course accommodations as described in 3.3.5, Learning Support Considerations.

  2. Appropriate course and testing accommodations should be made for students with sensory, mobility, or systemic disorders. General and specific guidelines for documentation of these disorders appear in Section 3, Appendices D and E. Documentation on such students is to be maintained at the institution and summarized in the annual report on accommodations for students with disabilities.


2.9.2 Numbering of Learning Support Courses

(Last Modified February 26, 2019)   Report a broken link

Last reviewed: February 2019

A uniform procedure is to be used in reporting credit for Learning Support courses on the workload of both instructor and student. These courses should be reported on the workload of both instructor and student in the same way that courses for degree credit are reported.

All Learning Support courses should carry course numbers of 0999 or below.

Approved Learning Support course numbers and titles and their paired collegiate courses are listed below:

English
ENGL 0999
Support for English Composition (1 – 3 credits) paired with ENGL 1101 English Composition I

Mathematics
MATH 0997
Support for Quantitative Reasoning (1 – 3 credits) paired with MATH 1001 Quantitative Reasoning

MATH 0998 Support for Mathematical Modeling (1 – 3 credits) paired with MATH 1101 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling

MATH 0999 Support for College Algebra (1 – 3 credits) paired with MATH 1111 College Algebra

These courses should not form a part of associate degree or baccalaureate programs. Credit awarded for these courses may not be used to fulfill requirements for associate or baccalaureate degrees.


2.9.3 Reporting and Recording Learning Support Status

(Last Modified October 1, 2020)   Report a broken link

Last reviewed: February 2019

All students enrolled in Learning Support courses will be reported in the USG Academic Data Collection as having Learning Support requirements or enrolling as volunteers.

For placement and exit codes for students entering Fall Semester 2015 through Summer Semester 2018 click here.

For placement and exit codes for students entering Fall Quarter 1994 through Summer Semester 2015 click here.

For placement and exit codes for students entering prior to Fall Quarter 1994, click here.


(Last Modified June 3, 2021)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
ACADEMIC COMMON MARKET HANDBOOK SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD, 1985.

The Academic Common Market is an interstate agreement for sharing educational programs and facilities so that students can participate in selected programs not offered in their home states without having to pay out-of-state tuition charges. The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) coordinates the activities of the Academic Common Market for the 14 participating states (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia).

One of the primary functions of the Academic Common Market is to assist states in offering together what they cannot offer alone. Programs are added to and removed from the Market on an annual basis in order to reflect the changing needs of participating states.

States are asked to indicate to SREB the kinds of programs that are unavailable through their own institutions, and in which they want to gain access in other states. This information is shared with other states, which can then determine if they have programs that would be appropriate for the Common Market. On this basis, in early spring, states recommend programs from their own institutions to be included in the Common Market. The recommendations are compiled and circulated among the states. If one or more states select a given recommended program, it is included in the Market for residents of the state(s) which selected it. If a program is not selected at this time, it remains on the nominated program list for two more years. An updated booklet and other publicity materials are then prepared and distributed. For more information, see https://www.sreb.org/academic-common-market.

Students wishing to enter a program as a Common Market student should take the following steps: It is the student’s responsibility to contact their respective State Coordinator about possible access through the Academic Common Market.

  1. The student must first be accepted for admission into a program for which his/her state has access through the Academic Common Market. Unless accepted for admission, all other preparations could be wasted effort should the student not be accepted by the institution.
  2. The student must then be certified as a resident of his/her home state. Each state has developed its own forms and procedures for certifying students. The Georgia form for certifying students is located at http://www.usg.edu/divisions/academic_common_market/acm_procedures/. The criteria for certification are at least as strict as those used by the state in classifying students as residents for its own academic programs. As long as the student remains enrolled, this certification will be valid.
  3. After certifying the residency of an applicant, the State Coordinator, sends a notice of certification to the student and to the Institutional Coordinator at the receiving institution.
  4. The Institutional Coordinator then makes arrangements with the appropriate officials at his institution so that the student is not charged out-of-state tuition fees.
  5. For programs no longer available through the Market, students already enrolled will be given a reasonable amount of time to complete the degree program while receiving Market benefits.

For more information, see Academic Common Market.

(Last Modified October 13, 2020)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:

Report to the Board: Committee on Academic Affairs Agenda Item No. August 5, 2016 Meeting of the Board Effective Date: 8/5/2016

REPORT TO THE BOARD: COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AGENDA ITEM NO. 1, NOVEMBER 13, 1986 MEETING OF THE BOARD
EFFECTIVE DATE: 7/9/1986

Last update 1/7/20

The Regents’ Engineering Pathways - formerly known as Regents’ Engineering Transfer Program

The Regents’ Engineering Pathways (REP) is based upon the concept of students successfully completing thirty or more credit hours in specific courses at designated units of the USG and then completing their engineering degrees at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Southern University, Kennesaw State University, Mercer University, or the University of Georgia.

REP Agreement

REP Engineering Institutions:
Georgia Institute of Technology
Georgia Southern University
Kennesaw State University
Mercer University
University of Georgia

(Last Modified October 12, 2020)   Report a broken link

Information for this topic can be found under 2.3.7 of the Academic Affairs Handbook and the Board Policy 3.3.2, Academic Approval for Off-Campus Instructional Sites and Board Policy 9.3, Facilities Approval for Off-Campus Instructional Sites.

(Last Modified October 12, 2020)   Report a broken link

The contents of this section have been removed. Information on Study Abroad and other International programs may be found on the International Education web page.

(Last Modified April 6, 2011)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
INFORMATION ITEM, BOARD OF REGENTS, 11/1979

Research Centers
A research “center” provides an organizational base for research in a given academic area or closely related areas. It often provides a vehicle for interdisciplinary research in a given area involving faculty and students from a variety of internal administrative structures. A center may be involved in offering continuing education activities related to its area(s) of interest. The center structure may facilitate efforts of the college or university to obtain extramural funding in specific areas. It serves as a formalized link between the academic community and the professional community in the area(s) of focus. A center, however, is not an autonomous structure within the internal statutory organization of a college or university. It is administratively most often an appendage of one of the traditional administrative structures, such as a department. A center is not involved in the independent offering of credit course or degree programs.

Institutes
An “institute” shares a center’s focus on research, provision of opportunity for interdisciplinary activity, involvement in continuing education activities, value in facilitating efforts to obtain extramural funding, and service as a link between the academic and professional communities. An institute, however, is a far more formalized structure and may be equivalent to an autonomous unit within the internal structure of the college or university such as a department, division, school or (university level) college. Unlike a center, an institute may offer credit courses and degree programs.

(Last Modified October 12, 2020)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.8.2, ASSOCIATE DEGREES
BOARD MINUTES 1989-90, PP. 368–369
BOARD MINUTES, 2004–2005

2.15.1 Implementation Guidelines for Career Degrees

(Last Modified March 31, 2021)   Report a broken link

Following are guidelines to assist institutions implementing career degrees:

  1. All cooperative degree programs are to be listed as one of the following:

       
    A.A.S. in Business (AASBC) CIP 52.9999
    A.A.S. in Health (AASHC) CIP 51.9999
    A.A.S. in Services (AASSC) CIP 43.9999
    A.A.S. in Technology (AASTC) CIP 48.9999
  2. Although the four degree names and CIP codes may also be used for A.A.S. degrees offered independently by USG institutions, these four acronyms (AASBC, AASHC, AASSC, AASTC) may only be used for cooperative degrees. The “C” in each acronym will allow the University System Office to determine the number of students completing these cooperative programs.

  3. The options listed by institutions under one of these four cooperative degrees may not all be from the same CIP group as the degree itself. For example, there may be horticultural programs (CIP 01) listed as options under the business degree (CIP 07).

  4. The listed options and related CIP numbers should reflect the program names and CIP numbers approved for the cooperating technical institute by the State Board of Technical and Adult Education.

  5. Institutions wishing to propose new cooperative degree programs should complete the
    Form for Establishing a New Agreement

    Approval of such proposals will require Board action.

  6. Institutions wishing to propose modifications to existing independent A.A.S. programs may do so by using the
    Request to Reaffirm and/or Modify Existing A.A.S. Programs form


2.15.2 “REM” Courses

(Last Modified April 12, 2011)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
BoR POLICY MANUAL 4.2.2, ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS NOT LEADING TO THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

For those students in career associate degree, certificate, or non- degree programs who need remediation in an area but are not otherwise required to take Learning Support in that area, the institution should establish appropriate remedial experiences. If an institutional credit course is required for these students, it should be designated by the prefix “REM” and numbered below 100. Only students in career associate degree, certificate, or non-degree programs may register for “REM” courses.


(Last Modified February 26, 2021)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
TCSG SACSCOC 2016
BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.5, UNIVERSITY SYSTEM AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE SYSTEM OF GEORGIA ARTICULATION
EFFECTIVE DATE: 1/2012
Revised: 9/24/2014

According to a January 2012 agreement between the USG and the TCSG known as the “Complete College Georgia Articulation Agreement,” the courses listed in the chart below will transfer between USG and Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC)-accredited TCSG institutions, and comparable placement and exit test results are honored between systems.

TCSG USG Course Transfer Chart

Following are guidelines for implementation of the policy.

The Complete College Georgia articulation agreement is based on the principles of serving student needs, avoiding duplication of mission, using state resources efficiently, and expanding opportunities for post-secondary attainment in Georgia.

  1. USG institutions may create more expansive agreements with a local TCSG institution. This information should be published on the institutional website.
  2. USG institutions must notify BOR Office of Academic Affairs as soon as possible when discussions begin about potential AS degree articulation agreements with a TCSG institution AND before entering into an AS degree articulation with a TCSG institution. TCSG has agreed that AS degrees will be limited in number and meet the following criteria:
    1. Focused on specific career opportunities associated with a specific local community, i.e. AS in Logistics Management by Savannah Technical College with Georgia Southern University.
    2. Initiated in regions of the state where the proposed degree is not currently offered by a USG institution therefore avoiding unnecessary duplication.
    3. If a USG institution does have the program, consideration of necessary v. unnecessary duplication will be predicated on the capacity and willingness of the USG institution to offer the degree in the area.
  3. TCSG institutions will not offer AA degrees. These procedures shall apply to all TCSG degrees with one exception, Nursing.

  4. USG institutions must notify BOR Office of Academic Affairs prior to establishing expansive articulation agreements that include all TCSG institutions.

This transfer agreement is effective for those students from SACSCOC-accredited TCSG institutions:

  • who enrolled in any of the courses on the General Education Transfer Chart in January 2012 or later OR
  • who enrolled in ENG 191 and/or MAT 190 or 191 courses that began in January 2002 or thereafter
    AND
  • who meet the minimum requirements for exemption from Learning Support OR
  • who successfully complete and meet the requirements for exit from Learning Support English and/or mathematics beginning January 2002

To be eligible for articulation agreement transfer credit, students must have exempted or completed Learning Support requirements at a TCSG institution. To calculate Math Placement (MPI) and English Placement (EPI) Indices using USG formulae, a CPE-COMPASS-ASSET Linkage table is supplied. Since the formulae for calculating MPI and EPI do not use CPE or ASSET, these scores will have to be converted to equivalent COMPASS scores to calculate the placement indices.

  1. TCSG transfer students meeting USG standard admissions criteria are exempt from Learning Support evaluation (see BoR POLICY MANUAL 4.2.1.1, Freshman Requirements.)
  2. Students who have taken a COMPASS or ASSET placement test at a SACSCOC-accredited TCSG college and transfer to a USG institution will not be required to take another placement test if they have attended the institution and have the placement scores recorded on the transcript.
  3. USG and TCSG will accept comparable placement scores. See formulae for calculating placement indices in section 2.9.1.
  4. Test scores from non-SACSCOC-accredited TCSG institutions will not be accepted for exemption or exit from Learning Support.
  5. Exit from Learning Support at a SACSCOC-accredited TCSG institution will be honored at all USG institutions. Students who exempt Learning Support but transfer without credit for the core curriculum course may be placed in Learning Support at the receiving institution based on institutional requirements higher than the USG minimum.
  6. The current policy allowing institutions to individually evaluate courses other than the mini-core courses and make decisions about acceptance will continue.

List of SACSCOC - accredited TCSG Institutions

(Last Modified February 16, 2021)   Report a broken link

SOURCE:

BoR POLICY MANUAL 3.3.6, Academic Credit Earned Through Extra-Institutional and Prior Learning

Institutions shall use the criteria below when deciding to offer credit for military service and standardized examinations (including International Baccalaureate, Advanced Placement, College Level Examination Program, and DANTES Subject Standard Test Program).

Institutions shall maintain a review process for extra-institutional and prior learning that adheres to SACSCOC policies and guidelines, minimizes the number of credits that do not contribute to progress toward a degree program, and does not improperly affect student eligibility for financial aid.

Course Credit for Military Experience

Academic Credit
When a student requests academic credit based on experience in the military service, the following procedure is recommended:

  1. The Registrar researches the American Council on Education (ACE) Guide to determine the recommendation(s) made by that organization.
  2. The Registrar advises appropriate the academic department head(s) of the ACE recommendation(s).
  3. The appropriate academic officer advises the Registrar of what credit, if any, is to be granted in that specific discipline. Credit should not be awarded for course/experiences not offered by that academic institution.
  4. The Registrar records the appropriate credit on the student’s official transcript and advises both the student and academic advisor of the credit that has been granted.

Physical Education Credit
The granting of physical education credits should be based upon the following recommendations:

  1. Basic military training should serve as substitutes for Physical Conditioning and Marksmanship for a total of two (2) semester-hour credits.
  2. Experience beyond basic military training should be evaluated based upon length and type of activity and the level of accomplishment in the specific activity. For example:
    • A Navy Seal should receive credit for swimming.
    • A Medic should receive credit for first aid.
    • A Military Policeman should receive credit for self-defense.
  3. Credit by examination may be offered to students having mastered a specific area of the basic physical education requirement.
  4. If recommendations 1, 2, and 3 are not satisfactory, then the evaluation process will be determined by the appropriate academic office.

Course Credit for Standardized Examinations

University System of Georgia (USG) institutions shall establish and publish policies and procedures for awarding of course credit based on scores achieved on standardized examinations offered by nationally-recognized organizations including:

  • International Baccalaureate Program (IB)
  • Advanced Placement Program (AP)
  • College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
  • DANTES Subject Standardized Test Program (DSST)

The particular courses for which students receive college credit may vary from institution to institution, depending on what courses the institution offers. Determinations of course comparability shall be made by the respective departments. Institutions shall, however, attempt to have consistency in terms of minimum scores for awarding credit and the course(s) for which credit is awarded across the USG for common-numbered core courses based on recommendations made by System-wide Regents’ Advisory Committees (RACs) for the discipline (where available).

With all course credits based on standardized examination scores, students may opt not to accept credits. If students believe that the awarding of course credits based on standardized examination scores is in error, they may file appeals with the appropriate academic department office and request reevaluations. As with other academic matters, if the issue is not satisfactorily resolved at the department level, students may appeal to the dean of the respective school or college, with a final appeal to the vice president for academic affairs, whose decision in the matter will be final.

These policies and procedures shall apply to all students matriculating at the institution, including both resident and non-resident students. Qualifying scores and course credits to be awarded based on these examinations must be published on the institutions’ websites and may also be included elsewhere, including in the college catalog.

Course Credit for International Baccalaureate (IB) Examination Scores

USG institutions shall award academic credit for appropriate courses in the USG core curriculum for corresponding IB subject areas in which the student obtained designated end-of-course assessment scores.

Both Standard Level (college preparatory) and Higher Level (college comparable) exam scores will be considered for credit. Higher Level end- of-course assessment scores of four or more and Standard Level scores of five or more suggest that the IB Program work is comparable to a college course.

The course credit schema in the table below shall be used system-wide, with allowances made for variable credits in each category to account for labs, and on occasion, for depth of material covered in the IB Program subject area that may be comparable to more than one college-level course.

Semester Credit Hours Granted

Score Standard Level Higher Level
4 0 3-4
5 0-4 3-8
6-7 3-8 3-12

All institutions shall have a widely disseminated policy governing the award of course credits based on IB assessments. The policy will apply to both resident and non-resident students.

Course Credit for Advanced Placement (AP), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), and DANTES Subject Standardized Test Program (DSST)

In determining qualifying scores for college credit, institutions must consider American Council on Education (ACE) recommendations for credit associated with scores on standardized examinations as well as recommendations made by System-wide Regents’ Advisory Committees (RACs) for the discipline (where available).

For new students, credit should not be awarded for courses not offered by the admitting institution. Determinations of course comparability will be made initially by the respective departments and subsequently by published policies and procedures. When the content of AP courses or CLEP or DSST exams is close to that of USG common-numbered courses, institutions shall attempt to have consistency across the USG in terms of minimum scores for awarding credit and the course(s) for which credit is awarded.

For students transferring in with credit awarded at another institution for core courses based on standardized test scores, if the student has passed a higher level course in the course sequence offered at the sending institution, the core credit must be awarded as core transfer credit even if the receiving institution does not offer comparable course(s).

For students transferring in with credit based on standardized test scores awarded for courses outside the core, credit must be awarded if the student has passed another course in the sequence and the course(s) for which credit(s) has (have) been awarded is (are) part of the requirements for the degree the student is seeking.

Institutions have the option to award transfer credits based on standardized test scores even if the student has not passed a higher level course in the course sequence at the sending institution. In this case, institutions should follow their published policies and procedures for awarding of credit based on scores achieved on standardized examinations.

(Last Modified April 6, 2011)   Report a broken link

SOURCES:
UNIVERSITY SYSTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL, 08/17/90 MINUTES

Institutional Chief Academic Officers will encourage faculty to clarify for students, at the beginning of each course, the basis on which grades will be determined and to provide timely academic feedback as the course progresses. This encouragement should include the following:

  1. A statement in the syllabus stating whether the professor intends to have a portion of the cumulative class grade reported to the student prior to the midpoint of the total grading period and reference to how that portion of the grade is determined.
  2. Prior to midpoint of the total grading period, all assigned and “turned in” graded class assignments and examinations should be graded and available to the student.
  3. The instructor and student should make every effort to be available during instructor’s office hours for discussion of the student’s academic standing prior to the midpoint of the total grading period (particularly for classes that use subjective grading).

Each individual Chief Academic Officer should clarify his/her position on these points; discuss them with the faculty of his/her institution; establish policy or guidelines based upon faculty input; and, when appropriate, publish the campus response to these points in campus literature.

(Last Modified July 19, 2018)   Report a broken link

The Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG shall establish guidelines concerning the designation and sale of textbooks required for coursework.

Educational material is defined as any instruments, devices, software, web content, or copied or published materials used in the classroom, laboratory, on-line courses, or correspondence courses.

All information required for ordering educational materials should be submitted to institutional bookstores. Exceptions can be approved at the departmental level. The institutional bookstore will distribute lists of these educational materials to private competitors. Recommendations to students, as to source for materials, should not list one supplier over another.

  1. There are no restrictions on the adoption of textbooks written by faculty members. Prior to the adoption of a textbook, approval must be obtained from the departmental committee. The existence of such a committee is necessary to prevent any possible conflicts of interest.
  2. No faculty member may charge/collect remuneration for educational materials directly from the students.
  3. If any conflict of interest arises as a result of sales of textbooks or other educational materials, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, in consultation with the Deans Council, Faculty Senate, and Student Government, will appoint a committee to hear the case and advise the Vice President for Academic Affairs on a course of action.
  4. Copyright clearance must be obtained by the issuing department or faculty, where necessary, for compilations to be sold through institutional bookstores. Institutional and System general counsel may insist on this process.
  5. Royalties may not be paid to individual faculty for compilations he/she produces for copy and resale through an institutional bookstore.

2.3.7 External Degrees: Off-Campus & Online Instructional Delivery

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According to BOR Policies 3.3.2 and 3.3.3, the Board recognizes two categories of external degree offerings, off-campus instruction and distance education.

a) Off-campus instruction is defined as traditional face-to-face classroom instruction that occurs at a location away from the home premises of the institution.

b) Distance education is defined as a formal educational process in which the majority of the instruction occurs when student and instructor are not in the same place and the instruction is delivered using technology.

2.3.7.1 Off-Campus Delivery Approval Procedures

The designation of an off-campus instructional location as a campus, center, or consortium requires approval by the Board of Regents through its Committee on Academic Affairs. (See BOR Policy 9.3 - Facilities Approval for Off-Campus Instructional Sites for additional information on off-campus instruction.)

After an instructional site has been approved by the Board, the institution may offer 50% or more of any of their existing approved programs at the instructional location by obtaining administrative approval through the Office of Academic Affairs at least 60 days prior to the implementation of the additional program(s) at the site.

Institutions may also seek to offer 50% or more of any of their existing approved programs at a location that is not a Board-approved instructional campus, center, or consortium (e.g., a public school, a company, or an agency). Such program delivery arrangements do not involve the naming of this location as an official institutional instructional site and are usually contractual and time-limited. Institutions seeking to deliver 50% or more of any existing degree program at such a site must obtain administrative approval through the Office of Academic Affairs at least 60 days prior to the implementation of the program(s) at the site.

For all types of off-campus instructional delivery, it is desirable, in terms of program availability and mission appropriateness, to have the closest qualified institution respond to off-campus credit course needs. In cases where requests for services exceed the qualifications, mission, program availability, or capability of the closest institution, then attempts should be made to have such requests met by other qualified university system institutions.

Academic programs offered on campus are supported by processes, services, and infrastructure which were developed for campus-based educational delivery. When programs are delivered externally, those processes may be inappropriate or insufficient in the new location or format. Because academic and student support services are vital to the success of academic programs, those delivered in a non-traditional format or at an off-campus location must involve comparable levels of academic and student support services that contribute to overall student success and that are for students at that location.

Prior to the submission or a request for off-campus course work delivery, the president of the proposing institution will discuss and notify the president(s) of all other university system institution(s) located in closer geographic proximity to the site proposed for the off-campus course work. A letter of non-objection or support from the president of the closer proximity institution should be included in the administrative approval request. In the event the involved institutions are unable to arrive at a mutual agreement on the offering of off-campus credit courses, the issues will be referred to the Chief Academic Officer for final resolution.

Additional information and request forms for all off-campus instructional delivery may be found at the following website: https://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/academic_affairs_approvals_and_notifications.

2.3.7.2 Distance Learning Approval Procedures

The Board of Regents encourages the use of distance learning to help meet the instructional needs of the citizens of the State. Approval procedures for delivery of distance learning programs follow SACS requirements and are intended to allow institutions to avoid duplication of effort in the development of material submitted to SACS and the Board of Regents for approval.

Prior approval by the Board of Regents is required for an initial program delivered fifty percent or more via distance learning by an institution and for any additional distance learning program(s) requiring SACS approval for substantive change (i.e., significant departure from originally approved programs). See SACS Policy on Substantive Change

Institutions must receive Board approval for their initial distance learning delivery of fifty percent or more of an existing approved program prior to implementing the program. However, once an institution is approved for distance delivery, only notification to the Office of Academic Affairs is needed to offer additional existing approved programs 50% or more via distance learning, unless the distance delivery of the program requires SACS approval for a substantive change. In the latter case, Board approval must be obtained in order to implement the additional program.

Additional information and request forms for all off-campus instructional delivery may be found at the following website: https://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/academic_affairs_approvals_and_notifications.


2.3.8 Certificates

(Last Modified April 28, 2021)   Report a broken link

University System institutions are required to notify the Office of Academic Programs when a new certificate is established. Notification will be provided using the certificate notification form (https://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/academic_affairs_approvals_and_notifications). Changes in a certificate name should also be sent to the Office of Academic Programs as notification.

Embedded certificates, those certificates that are only awarded to a student upon completion of a degree and are a self-contained set of courses embedded in a major or stand-alone degree, do not require notification and are not listed separately on the Degrees and Majors inventory. Additional information may be found at the following website: https://www.usg.edu/academic_programs/academic_affairs_approvals_and_notifications.


2.3.9 Dual Degrees

(Last Modified April 28, 2021)   Report a broken link

Dual Degrees in the University System of Georgia are defined according to SACSCOC’s Agreements Involving Joint and Dual Academic Awards: Policy and Procedures. Programs of study offered in which each institution awards a separate program completion credential require notification to the Office of Academic Programs at least two weeks prior to implementation. Only dual degrees comprised of academic programs that have been previously approved by the Board of Regents either at a single University System institution or between University System institutions shall be forwarded as notification items. All new degree programs in collaborative arrangements require Board approval. Dual Degrees within a single University System institution also require notification to the Office of Academic Programs at least two weeks prior to implementation. See the Academic Affairs - Approvals and Notifications web page for appropriate notification forms for dual degrees.

Each institution conferring the degree assumes responsibility for meeting SACSCOC’s requirements for collaborative academic arrangements.

Should it be determined that a dissolution of the dual degree arrangement is in the best interest of the institution(s) involved, it is incumbent upon the institution(s) to advise faculty and students appropriately and in a timely manner of the conclusion of the dual degree program and with provisions for teach out agreements with one another. In such cases, notification of the dissolution of the dual degree arrangement will be submitted to the Office of Academic Programs two weeks prior to dissolution and within a timeframe that does not have an adverse impact on students or faculty.


2.3.10 Joint Degrees

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Joint educational programs in the University System of Georgia are defined according to SACSCOC’s Agreements Involving Joint and Dual Academic Awards: Policy and Procedures. A joint educational program is one whereby students study at two or more institutions and are awarded a single program completion credential bearing the names, seals, and signatures of each of the participating institutions. Only joint degrees comprised of academic programs that already exist and are Board of Regents approved programs either between or among University System institutions shall be forwarded as notification items. All new degree programs require Board approval.

All joint degree arrangements require each participating USG institution to notify the Office of Academic Programs at least two weeks prior to implementation. It is incumbent upon all USG institutions to meet SACSCOC requirements for Agreements Involving Joint and Dual Academic Awards: Policy and Procedures.

Three categories of joint degree arrangements are possible according to SACSCOC. They are: 1) joint degrees with institutional partner(s) which are SACSCOC accredited; 2) joint degrees with an institutional partner(s) which is accredited by a USDOE-Orecognized accreditor other than SACSCOC; and 3) joint degrees with an institutional partner(s) which is not accredited by a USDE-recognized accreditor.

Please see the Academic Affairs - Approvals and Notifications web page for the appropriate notification forms and documentation required for these degree arrangements.

Should it be determined that a dissolution of the joint degree arrangement is in the best interest of the institutions involved, it is incumbent upon the institutions to advise faculty and students appropriately and in a timely manner of the conclusion of the joint degree program and with provisions for teach out agreements with one another. In such cases, notification of the dissolution of the joint degree arrangement will be submitted via a notification letter to the Office of Academic programs two weeks prior to closure and within a time frame that does not have an adverse impact on students or faculty.


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