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University System Expands Efforts to Meet State’s Shortage of Health-Care Professionals

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Atlanta — July 5, 2005

The University System of Georgia (USG) has stepped up its already significant effort to address Georgia’s shortage of health-care professionals. Today USG officials announced a new $7 million program that will add more than 300 nurses and technologists to the Georgia workforce over the next two years.

The initiative will be administered under the auspices of the USG’s Intellectual Capital Partnership Program (ICAPP®). It is targeted toward non-traditional students who seek a second career in healthcare and current college students who are not currently enrolled in health-care courses or degree program.

Seven University System institutions will collaborate with 22 private health-care providers throughout Georgia on the initiative that begins this fall and concludes in December 2007. State dollars for the two-year program total $2.3 million, with private sector partners contributing more than $4.7 million to the effort.

“Since 2002, the Board of Regents has focused considerable resources on the shortage of health-care professionals,” said University System Chancellor Thomas C. Meredith. “This marks the latest round in our on-going efforts aimed at ensuring that Georgia hospitals and clinics have the people needed to serve local communities with high-quality healthcare.”

The new program uses ICAPP’s® proven model that meets the “just-in-time-needs” of the state’s business community. While a separate effort, the special project is similar to the current ICAPP® Health Professionals Initiative (HPI) that matches private sector health-care providers with University System colleges and universities. In operation for three years, the HPI model provides accelerated education to produce graduates in the fields of nursing, medical technology and pharmacy.

The following University System institutions, programs, and partners have joined forces in this latest ICAPP® project:

  • Augusta State University LPN to RN Bridge Program: The corporate partners for this $906,016 program are Doctor’s Hospital, University Hospital, and St. Joseph Hospital. The program is projected to produce 64 graduates.
  • Coastal Georgia Community College Associate Degree in Nursing Program: The corporate partner for this $575,005 program is Southeast Georgia Health System. The program is projected to produce 36 graduates.
  • Dalton State College Associate Degree in Nursing Program: The corporate partner for this $241,125 program is Hamilton Health Care System, Inc. The program is projected to produce 40 graduates.
  • Darton College Paramedic to RN Bridge and Polysomnographic Technologist Programs: The corporate partners for these two programs totaling $1,254,663 in funding are Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital, Archbold Medical Center, Miller County Hospital, Palmyra Medical Center, Sumter Regional Hospital, DCI, Inc., St. Francis Hospital, Albany Pulmonary and Critical Care, Inc., and Colquitt Regional Medical Center. The program is projected to produce 48 registered nursing graduates and 15 polysomnographic technologists.
  • Georgia Southwestern State University Bachelor to BSN Program: The corporate partners for this $482,238 program are Crisp Regional Hospital, Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital, Sumter Regional Hospital, and Palmyra Hospital. The program is projected to produce 40 graduates eligible to qualify for RN licensing.
  • Gordon College LPN to RN Bridge Program: The corporate partners for this $3,145,316 program are Spalding Regional Medical Center, Upson Regional Medical Center, Anchor Psychiatric Hospital, and Brightmoor Nursing Center. The program is projected to produce 54 graduates.
  • Valdosta State University Bachelor to BSN Program: The corporate partners for this $384,151 program are South Georgia Medical Center, Smith Northview Hospital, and Archbold Medical Center. The program is projected to produce 36 graduates.

Students attending the polysomnographic courses will earn a certificate. All other graduates will earn either an associate’s degree or a Bachelor of Science in Nursing that qualifies individuals to take the national licensing exam for registered nurses.

Individuals who want to enroll in any of these special programs should contact the Nursing or Allied Health department at the institution offering the program in which they are interested.

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