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Business Procedures Manual

The University System of Georgia (USG) operates in a complex business environment whereby operating and non-operating revenue is generated. Management of any accounts receivable resulting from the revenue generating activities is important to the financial health of its institutions. The wide variety of receivables generated by the various activities of the University System results in thousands of individual accounts representing, in total, millions of dollars.

In order to effect early conversion of these receivables to cash and minimize credit losses, each institution must maintain a diligent program for managing receivables. The management function consists of granting credit, billing accounts, effecting collection, analyzing outstanding accounts (aging), and providing for bad debts.

This section provides a brief summary of rules and regulations affecting accounts receivable at USG institutions. Each institution must comply with regulations regarding billing, collections, and write-off of uncollectible accounts.

Receivable accounts are established for students (tuition and fees), employees (travel), federal and state agencies (grants and contracts), sponsored students (scholarships), auxiliary service enterprises (residence halls and bookstores), and other miscellaneous receivables that may be specific to certain institutions. These receivables are explained below.

10.1.1 Student Receivables

Tuition

  1. Granting of Credit: Receivable accounts for tuition are established while waiting for financial aid funds or scholarship funds from third parties on behalf of the student. Students who have not paid or whose financial aid has not been affirmed by the “add/drop” date should be dropped from class rolls.

  2. Aging and Analysis: Although student account receivables for tuition should be kept current, they should be reported on the aging report that is submitted to the University System Office (USO), as noted in Section 10.5.

  3. Collections: Due process should be followed in the collection of student receivables. Students should be given written notice about the nature and the amount of the outstanding obligation. If financial aid funds, scholarship funds, or guaranteed third party payor funds are not authorized for the student and he/she cannot pay the tuition, the student should be dropped from class. See Section 10.7.4, Table 2

Fees

  1. Granting of Credit: Receivable accounts are established for additional student fees that may be determined after the student registers and for the administration of fines.

  2. Aging and Analysis: All receivables for fees should be reported on the aging report that is submitted to the University System Office, as noted in Section 10.5.

  3. Collections: Due process should be followed in the collection of student receivables. Students should be given written notice about the nature and the amount of the outstanding obligation. See Section 10.7.4, Table 2

In the case of uncollectible student receivables, after due process is followed and the account is turned over to a collection agency, the bad debt should be written off as detailed in section 10.4.1.

Restriction of Services to Students

All students having student accounts with a balance older than ninety (90) days must have services withheld until the balance is paid. The restriction of services will prevent the student from having access to transcripts, registering for additional classes, or graduating until the receivable is paid. At many institutions, this restriction of services may be referenced as a “hold” on the student’s records.

Note: Institutions may have more stringent restrictions than this section requires.


10.1.2 Employee Receivables

Travel

  1. Granting of Credit: Normally, an employee should not have more than one advance outstanding at a time. Each advance should be accounted for before another advance is granted.

  2. Aging and Analysis: Data similar to that needed for miscellaneous debtor bills is required in the case of travel advance claims. Aging will be based on the date travel is completed plus ten (10) days.

  3. Collection: USG travel regulations require that all outstanding advances be settled within ten (10) days after completion of the trip. The amount of an advance that exceeds the allowed travel expenditures shall immediately be refunded to the institution. Immediate refund of a travel advance is also required when an authorized trip is cancelled or indefinitely postponed.

If an outstanding advance has not been recovered by the time the accounting for the trip is due, institutions should, in the absence of extenuating circumstances, initiate action for recovery. See Section 10.7.4, Table 1.


10.1.3 State, Federal, and Similar Receivables

Billing

Claims originating with federal contract and grant activity or with state or private research agreements must be submitted promptly and accurately, since these claims are usually for large sums. Each institution must maintain procedures to ensure that the following billing standards are observed to the fullest extent practicable.

  1. Periodic Interim Claims: All reimbursable expenditures, net of amounts that are required to be withheld until final claims, should be billed to the proper agency within thirty (30) days of the close of the period (monthly, bimonthly, quarterly, etc.) for which reimbursement can be claimed.

  2. Final Claims: Final claims for reimbursable expenditures should be submitted to the proper agency within ninety (90) days of the completion of the term of the contract, grant, or other agreement under which the expenses have been incurred.

Collection and Analysis

In order to ensure the prompt collection of these claims, a definite sequence of reimbursement collection efforts must be established, although the procedures will vary by funding agency. Aging information required is similar to that needed for miscellaneous receivables. In those instances where claims must be rebilled, the original billing date will continue to be used for aging purposes. Institutional follow-up procedures should take advantage of existing direct contacts available to campus contract and grant officers. See Section 10.7.4, Table 1.


10.1.4 Sponsored Students Deferred Fees

Deferred registration fees for sponsored students should be billed to the proper sponsoring agency within thirty (30) days of the close of the registration period for the quarter for which the fees are due.


10.1.5 Auxiliary and Service Enterprises

Residence Halls

Residence hall receivables are managed at each institution in accordance with the terms of the contract between the students and the institution. Amounts due from students who no longer live in a residence hall are to be pursued in accordance with the procedures described in Section 10.7.4, Table 2, for student bills. In analyzing these receivables, accounting offices must separately identify amounts representing deferred income (paid in advance) and age them as amounts not yet due.

Bookstores

Bookstores should limit the extension of credit to faculty and staff members, and outside organizations that regularly deal with bookstores. Their receivables should be managed in accordance with procedures described in Section 10.7.4, Table 1, for employees and the general public.


10.1.6 Other Receivables

Accruals and Other Unbilled Receivables

This category includes the following kinds of accounts:

  • Fiscal year-end accruals for unbilled current expenditures against contracts and grants.
  • Deferred registration fees for sponsored students that have not yet been billed to the sponsoring agency.
  • Credits due from vendors for returned merchandise, to be applied to subsequent purchases.
  • Miscellaneous receivables representing miscellaneous accruals.
  • Cash received in excess of recorded receivables, applicable to unrecorded receivables. These excess funds should be recorded as Deferred Revenue at year end.

Each institution must establish procedures to ensure that accrued and unbilled receivables are continuously reviewed, and that billings are issued and recorded without undue delay.

Miscellaneous Receivables

Each institution has a variety of miscellaneous receivables not specifically described above. In each case, these accounts are to be analyzed and managed according to the control procedures described above that are most applicable to the particular receivable. Installment receivables, deposits, and other amounts not yet due should be so identified.

Miscellaneous receivable accounts require particular attention in all phases of the management function because they represent a large number of transactions that arise from all types of activities throughout the University System. The bulk of the transactions involve relatively small amounts that become significant when taken as a whole. The potential for bad debts is high due to the fact that most debtors do not do business with the University System regularly.

There are three basic types of miscellaneous receivable transactions that require the granting of credit: student fines, departmental services, and special agreements.

  1. Student Fines: Miscellaneous invoices to students are primarily the result of punitive action for failure to comply with institution or departmental regulations. In most cases, the student is not available at the time it is determined that a fine is in order. Consequently, a bill must be issued notifying the student of his/her fine, and the University System is obligated to grant temporary credit to the student. A restriction of services to the student must be implemented as described in section 10.1.1.

  2. Departmental Services: Many institution departments are authorized to provide services or products to students and the general public. In these cases, the solicitation of customers and generation of income are not primary aims of the activities. As most transactions are for small amounts, the preparation of a bill and the granting of credit are properly influenced more by the need for the service than by the ability to pay. The risk of a few bad debts is acceptable compared to the avoidable administrative cost of credit investigation.

  3. Special Agreements: To handle recurring transactions with outside organizations, an institution will often establish special arrangements. Establishment of credit and timeliness of billing these cases should conform to normal commercial practice. Regular billing cycles will minimize the credit risk involved in these transactions.


The granting of credit is not a primary function of the University System. Therefore, credit will be granted only as indicated below:

  1. Credit is granted to students as required for the administration of fines and the assessment of additional fees that may be determined to be applicable after the student registers.

  2. Credit is also granted to students in accordance with Section 7.3.3 of the BoR Policy Manual, Tuition and Fee Payment and Deferral. Short-term credit may be granted to students while waiting for financial aid funds or scholarship funds from third parties. This credit is granted only when a notice of award or a written agreement from a third party has been received.

  3. Credit is automatically granted to faculty and staff for travel advances. Travel advances to non-University System personnel may be granted only in unusual circumstances and must be approved in advance by the president or chief business officer.

  4. Credit is granted to retirees and other persons receiving benefits under COBRA. All credit granted under this provision should be kept current; i.e., collected within thirty (30) days. If continued collection efforts are not successful, then termination of benefits must be accomplished according to the deadlines established in Section 5.1.5, COBRA and Retiree Billing.

  5. Credit may be granted to the general public, which may include students and staff, by campus departments that are authorized to provide services or products; these services or products are normally provided as an adjunct to instruction or research activities. Although cash should be collected whenever possible, credit may be granted when there are no facilities for the collection of cash, or when non-collection of cash is deemed to be in the best interest of the college/university. In these cases, prudence with respect to the credit risk incurred must be observed at the time of transaction.

  6. Credit is automatically extended to governmental units and foundations during the time claims for reimbursement are outstanding. Diligence must be exercised to ensure timely billing and collection efforts to minimize the receivables arising from these claims.

  7. Implicit in the granting of credit by institution departments is the intention that payment will be made in full upon receipt of a bill. Any formal arrangements authorizing credit for more than thirty (30) days must be approved by the president unless other institutional or USG policies or regulations operate to the contrary.

Prompt billing for reimbursement of expenses or fees arising from services provided under various agreements is essential for effective management of receivables. Information must be maintained on the status of all unbilled accounts to ensure that all actions necessary for the preparation of the bill have been taken as required. This will allow the bill to be issued as expeditiously as possible.

Senate Bill 73, codified as OCGA Section 50-16-18, provides state agencies with a mechanism for writing off debts of an immaterial nature owed to the state. The materiality threshold, as specified by the legislation, is “$3,000.00 or less for the institutions of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.”

This legislation authorizes state agencies and departments

…to develop appropriate standards, in conjunction with the Department of Audits and Accounts, which will provide a mechanism to consider administratively discharging any obligation or charge in favor of such agency or department when such obligation or charge is ….. $3,000 or any lesser amount for the institutions of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.

The following standards or procedures should be followed when writing off receivables that qualify under this statute.

Collection of receivables is primarily a responsibility of the institution. Amounts not collected through routine follow-up should be referred to collection agencies for further collection effort. In addition, presidents and chief business officers are authorized to file actions in small claims courts for the collection of debts over which they have administrative control. Adequate information concerning the age of outstanding bills and claims is essential for proper overall control of accounts receivable and related reserves for bad debts. Therefore:

  1. Aging information must be collected, maintained, reported, and acted upon in a standardized and consistent manner.

  2. Levels of effort in record keeping and collection must be commensurate with collection value. See Section 10.7.4

  3. In general, bills must be collected as expeditiously as possible, but the cost of collection must not be allowed to exceed the expected revenue. Accounting data gathering systems must recognize and preclude situations in which collection effort and potential benefits become imbalanced.

10.4.1 Provision for Bad Debts

Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) requires that bad debts be treated as a contra-revenue rather than an expense for financial reporting purposes. Budgetary reporting for Georgia also allows for like treatment for bad debts. This treatment effectively reduces revenue for debts that are not probable for collection. In order that realized revenue will be reflected properly, bad debts must be regularly recognized in the accounts of the University System as follows:

  1. All uncollectible accounts will be reserved as specific accounts are aged and consequently deemed to be uncollectible. Generally, debts aged more than one hundred eighty (180) days from the due date are no longer probable for collection. Circumstances may arise when specific accounts become uncollectible earlier than one hundred eighty (180) days.

    Note: Due date is defined as follows:

    • For student accounts, the due date is the first day of classes for the term.
    • For non-student accounts, the due date is generally thirty (30) days after the invoice date.
    • A student account due date may be modified to the date that financial aid is withdrawn in order to give the student and institution an opportunity to locate other payment arrangements.
  2. Accounts receivable should be analyzed and accounted for monthly as appropriate, no less than quarterly.

  3. All uncollectible accounts aged more than one hundred eighty (180) days from the due date should be reserved as an uncollectible account. This is the time by which collection agency efforts should commence.

  4. Once an invoice is determined to be uncollectible, either before or by the one hundred eighty (180) day past due date, all invoices within that account should be reserved as an uncollectible account.

  5. When uncollectible accounts are reserved, a funding source must be identified to fund the reserve. GASB requires that revenue-generated transactions, which generate accounts receivable that are deemed uncollectible, should be reversed. This methodology is the correct method for both budgetary and GAAP financial reporting. Georgia Annotated Code 50-16-18 allows for true write-off of uncollectible receivables for $3,000 or less.

    In order to accomplish the appropriate recognition of revenue, the following method will be used: The Allowance for Doubtful Revenue (Contra Revenue) account should be debited and the Allowance for Doubtful Accounts Receivable (Contra Accounts Receivable) account should be credited. This effectively reverses the revenue from current year operations for both budgetary accounting and GAAP reporting.

    The Contra-Revenue entry ensures that the uncollectible account amount is not spent. For budgetary reporting purposes, the Allowance for Doubtful Accounts Receivable (Contra Receivable) is reported as a Net Asset reserve and not as a reduction to Accounts Receivable.

    This method will be used regardless of the amount of each uncollectible account. As approved by the state auditors under Procedural Directive 17 (July 21, 1992), “fund integrity must be maintained at all times with regard to the uncollectible accounts”.

  6. When accounts receivable of $3,000 or less are ultimately determined uncollectible and due diligence for collection has taken place, the Accounts Receivable account should be credited and the Allowance for Doubtful Accounts Receivable account should be debited. This eliminates the receivable from the books of the campus in compliance with Georgia law.

    Note: Due diligence is defined as the performance of both:

    • Collection efforts by the institution according to the minimum guidelines in Section 10.7.4, and
    • Collection agency efforts, subject to cost vs. benefit assessment by the institution.

    Write-off of receivables is based upon the aggregate of the debtor, not on individual transactions. For example, a student may owe $4,000 in aggregate, with ten transactions of which no single transaction exceeds $3,000. In this case, the $4,000 cannot be written-off.

  7. The accounts receivable should be analyzed to determine if all receivables aged more than one hundred eighty (180) days from the due date are collectible. After due diligence collection efforts, the bad debts (less than or equal to $3,000) should be written off as follows:

    • Against existing Allowance for Doubtful Accounts Receivable account, as described in item #6 above, or
    • Against the contra-revenue account if the account was not previously reserved.
  8. The entries for uncollectible Accounts Receivable and the funding source for those amounts can be summarized in the following table: Uncollectible Accounts Receivable

  9. For accounts receivable write-offs resulting from non-revenue transactions, such as cash advances, there is no offsetting revenue. Therefore, the accounting entry should debit the bad debts expense account and credit the receivable account.


10.4.2 Death of a Debtor

A claim against the estate of a Georgia resident must be prepared in accordance with specific regulations and filed within six (6) months after first publication of notice to creditors. Therefore, in order to assure that the University System’s interests are fully protected, help from the institution’s general counsel or the USO, as appropriate, is to be sought whenever an institution receives notification that a person owing money to the institution has died. Potential claims against deceased nonresidents are to be referred to the institution’s general counsel for guidance. All tuition and fees shall be refunded and the revenue transaction reversed in the event of the death of a student at any time during the academic session. Refer to Section 7.3.5, Refunds, of the BoR Policy Manual.


10.4.3 Other – Accounting Issues for Uncollectible Accounts Federal Funds

Federal receivables resulting from contract and grant activity are to be considered, for write-off purposes, as disallowed charges. The funding source for disallowed charges is indirect cost recoveries (revenue). The account number for indirect cost recoveries is 4721xx. Other receivables from the federal government such as tuition, fees, veterans’ processing allowances, etc., that result in uncollectible accounts will qualify for one of the categories described in Section 10.4.1, item numbers 1 through 6, depending on the credit side of the entry setting up the receivable.

Unrecorded Receivables

From time to time it may be possible that amounts due the University System may not be recorded in any account. For instance, it may not be practical or cost efficient to maintain a perpetual subsidiary account balance for small dollar receivable amounts, such as parking fines and library fines. Write-offs of these accounts would therefore not be necessary. However, controls must be in place to ensure that:

  • Reasonable collection efforts are made.
  • Proper/independent supervisory personnel approve any non-collection.
  • Non-collection approval is documented.

Loan Funds

When loans advanced from loan funds are determined to be uncollectible and have been approved for write-off, they are to be written off either against the specific fund from which the loan has been advanced or against campus current funds, if any are available.

Punitive Damages – Bad Checks

When punitive damages have been collected from the writer of a bad check, the amount is to be recorded as income of the fund receiving the credit when the receivable was established. The cost of the collection effort may be recorded as an expense of the same fund.

Recoveries

Recoveries will be recorded by reversing the entry made to create the allowance for uncollectible accounts, with the exception of uncollectible accounts charged to bad debts expense. Recoveries of this nature will be recorded as miscellaneous income.


10.4.4 Assigning Receivables to Third Party Collection Agencies Write-off Policy

Uncollected accounts are to be considered as bad debts and, if less than or equal to $3,000, written off within thirty (30) days after notification by a collection agency that collection efforts have been exhausted. Before that point, institutions should consider reserving at least the portion of the account balance that will be kept as the collection fee by the collection agency, if the entire balance is not already reserved.

Authority to approve writing off of uncollectible accounts in the categories shown above has been delegated to the chief business officers for their respective institutions, and to the Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs for the University System Office (USO). Final approval for write-offs must be made by the State Accounting Office. See Sections 10.7.6 and 10.7.7

Collection Agencies

In order to maximize collection effectiveness, accounts should be referred to a collection agency as soon as the collection efforts specified in Sections 10.7.1 and 10.7.2, are completed. Unless there has been evidence of good faith intention to pay, an uncollected account should be referred for collection when it has become more than one hundred twenty (120) days and less than one hundred eighty (180) days past the due date. Collection agencies should not retain accounts more than twelve (12) months unless there is evidence that collection is imminent.

See Georgia Unannotated Code 10-1-382 for Georgia state law regarding collection agencies.


Each institution will submit an analysis of receivables, as shown in Section 10.7.5, to the Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs in accordance with the schedule indicated below.

Date of Analysis Date Due to Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs
As of December 31st February 10th
As of June 30th Ten (10) days after submission of Annual Financial Report (AFR)

10.6.1 Maintenance of Records

Physical Security

The physical paperwork providing proof of the receivable, and the computerized records recording the receivable and the continuing balance, should be stored according to current Records Retention Standards published by the State of Georgia. Even though records retention standards may allow destroying of paper documents and related electronic records after a certain period of time, institutions should be diligent in protecting all physical paperwork and electronic records that provide proof of the receivable. These paper documents providing proof of receivables may be very valuable in future collections, and may be checked during audits by state and internal auditors. If electronic archiving of data systems will destroy or make inaccessible these receivable records, then the institution should print and file this information for use.

Reference Numbers

All source documents will carry reference numbers that will appear in the computer-produced records. These reference numbers will be consecutive within each of the document series involved. The numbered documents will be filed in the Accounting office, or will be available for review by the Accounting office.

Breakdown of Control Standards

Any material breakdown of the record-keeping capability will be reported in writing to the Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs.


10.6.2 Reconciliation and Review

Aged listing of individual receivable balances will be prepared at least quarterly and will reflect the results of billing and collection follow-up activity. Management above the level responsible for supervising the billing and collection follow-up function will review old dated balances. The Accounting office will ensure that subsidiary ledger records (including those maintained outside the Accounting office) are reconciled to the control account balances at least quarterly.


10.6.3 Division of Responsibility

Personnel responsible for the following activities will be functionally divided and the divisions maintained as follows:

  1. Establishment of credit.

  2. Recording of charges.

  3. Recording of cash collections. Only cash collection stations will record cash, and the recording of cash will be the only function related to receivables performed by cash collection stations.

  4. Approval of write-off requests and other types of non-cash credits, such as cancellations. Non-cash credits will be approved by management levels above the supervisors of the functional divisions involved.

  5. Processing of documents. Input data will not be originated by computer facilities and operations personnel.

  6. Accounting.

    • All control account input will be approved and transmitted to computer facilities and operations by the Accounting office.
    • A subsidiary record of balances written-off as uncollectible will be maintained.
  7. Billing. Billings to individual debtors will be accessible only to billing activity personnel.

  8. Collection follow-up. Input data will not be originated by collection follow-up personnel.


10.7.1 Past Due Notices – Employees and the General Public

Past Due Stamp

PAST DUE
This bill is 60 days overdue;
prompt payment will be appreciated.

Interim Notice Letter

4TH NOTICE
Peachtree State University
Peachtree City, Georgia

Date March xx, 2005

Once again we call to your attention your account, which has a long overdue balance of $___________ representing charges billed through ___________________________. While we have received no reply to our previous notices, we are still assuming that you are interested in the settlement of your account. If you are unable to send your remittance by return mail, it will be to your advantage to write or call us immediately to make arrangements necessary to clear this balance, in order that we will not be forced to suspend further credit and take legal steps to effect a collection.

Very truly yours,

Final Notice Letter

FINAL NOTICE
Peachtree State University
Peachtree City, Georgia

Date April xx, 2005

This notice is in reference to your delinquent account balance of $___________ representing charges billed through _______________________. As all ordinary means used for collection of your account in a normal manner have failed to bring the desired results, we are notifying you that unless this balance is paid in full or suitable arrangements are made within ten days, we will suspend further credit and take legal steps to effect a collection.

Very truly yours,


10.7.2 Past Due Notices – Student Bills

Past Due Stamp

PAST DUE This bill is 60 days
overdue; prompt payment
will be appreciated.

Final Notice Letter

FINAL NOTICE
Peachtree State University
Peachtree City, Georgia 300000
Date September xx, 2004
Student Name
Address
Dear _________________:

We would like to call to your attention that your account with the (Specify department or office as appropriate), Peachtree State University, has an overdue balance as shown below. If this balance is not paid by (date), a restriction of services will be placed on your account, which will prevent you from having access to transcripts, registering for additional classes, or graduating until the receivable is paid. If you are unable to pay this account because of financial difficulties, we urge you to seek advice or assistance from the Financial Aid Office at (address and phone), or other source.

If you have any questions regarding your account, or if you wish an administrative review to consider any contentions you may have that all or some portion of the balance is not due, please contact [person(s)], before whom review will be held.

Sincerely,


Due: (account) Bill No. Amount: $


10.7.3 Sample Bad Check Demand Letter

(Date)
(Name of Check Writer)
(Address of Check Writer)
Dear:

Our records show that you have not responded to our (letter, conversation, telephone conversation) regarding your check number, dated. That check was made payable to Peachtree State University and was returned to us by (Name of Bank). We are prepared to proceed to a court of law unless payment on the amount below is received within 30 days of the date of this demand.

Amount of check $.
Returned check fee $.
Total to be paid $.

According to the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, Section 13-6-15, any person who writes a bad check or any order for payment of money that is dishonored for lack of funds is civilly liable and can be sued for double the amount of the check or $500, whichever is greater, plus the amount of the check and court costs. You will also be liable for a service charge in the amount of $30.00 or 5% of the face amount of the face amount of the check, whichever is greater.

IMMEDIATE COURT ACTION: Our court action against you will be in the amount of $ .

or

ESTABLISHED COLLECTION EFFORT: Unless payment of the amount specified above is received within 30 days of the date of this demand, the amount you owe the Peachtree State University , including punitive damages, will be in the amount of $ . Please mail your payment promptly to:

(Address)
You should be aware that these damages are allowed by law in a CIVIL action and do not take the place of any criminal prosecution that may be imposed by local law enforcement officials.

Sincerely,
(Signature)
Send certified mail, return receipt requested.


10.7.4 Collection Efforts

Table 1 – Employees and the General Public

Actions Required to be Taken

Activity 2nd Billing (Copy of Original) 3rd Billing (Past Due Stamp) Dunning Letter (Fourth Notice) Stronger Dunning Letter (Final Notice) Referral to Collection Agency
Days since Payment Due 30 days 60 days 90 days 120 days 180 days
           
Amount of Bill          
Up to $100 X X      
$100 - $300 X X X    
Over $300 X X X X X

Table 2 – Inactive Students

Actions Required to be Taken

Activity 2nd Billing (Copy of Original) 3rd Billing (Past Due Stamp) Dunning Letter   Referral to Collection Agency
Days since Payment Due 30 days 60 days 90 days   180 days
           
Amount of Bill          
Up to $100 X X      
$100 - $300 X X X    
Over $300 X X X   X

10.7.5 Accounts Receivable Report for Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs

Accounts Receivable sample spreadsheet


10.7.6 Sample Request for Write-off

SAMPLE

Peachtree State University
Listing of Accounts Receivable of $3,000 or Less
Request for Write-off

Name and Address Amount Previous Write-Off Debt Description Comments
John H. Doe
462 Amos Circle
Atlanta, GA 30331
$250.00 No Student Fees No response to last three attempts. Referred to collection agency 5-31-xx.
Mary S. Jones
1964 Rock Bridge Rd.
Augusta, GA 30910
$500.00 No Dormitory Rent Deceased.
Ronald A. Jones
4252 Allen Lane
Savannah, GA 31404
$66.00 No Student Activity Fee Moved. No current address available. Two attempts made.
Morris L. Cates
3476 Overlook
Stone Mtn., GA 30083
$1,500.00 No Vendor Payment not received Four attempts – referred to collection agency 5-31-xx. Prior year receivable.

I have reviewed the above listing and the attending documentation of collection attempts. I approve the request to write-off these accounts receivable under the statutory provisions contained in Senate Bill 73 (O.C.G.A Section 50-16-18) enacted by the 2003 General Assembly.

Date: June 30, 20xx                     Approved: _____________________________
                                                                       Chief Business Officer
                                                                       Peachtree State University

Date: ______________                  Approved: _____________________________
                                                                       Georgia State Accounting Office


10.7.7 Sample Request for Establishment of Reserve

SAMPLE

Peachtree State University
Listing of Uncollectable Accounts Greater Than $3,000
Request for Establishment of Reserve

Name and Address Amount Previous Write-Off Debt Description Comments
John H. Doe
462 Amos Circle
Atlanta, GA 30331
$3,500.00 No Student Tuition and Fees No response to last three attempts. | Referred to Collection agency mm/dd/yyyy
Mary S. Jones
1964 Rock Bridge Rd
Augusta, GA 30910
$3,400.00 No Dormitory Rent Deceased.
Morris L. Cates
3476 Overlook
Stone Mtn., GA 30083
$4,500.00 No Vendor Payment not received No response to last four attempts. Referred to Collection agency mm/dd/yyyy

I have reviewed the above listing and the attending documentation of collection attempts. I approve the request to establish a reserve for uncollectables as directed by Section 10.0 Accounts Receivable.

Date: June 30, 20xx                     Approved: _____________________________
                                                                       Chief Business Officer
                                                                       Peachtree State University


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