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Academic & Student Affairs Handbook

3.2 Freshman Requirements

SOURCE:
BoR POLICY 4.2.1.1, FRESHMAN REQUIREMENTS

Students seeking admission to a USG institution as a freshman must meet the following criteria:

3.2.1 High School Graduation

Last reviewed: January 2010 The student must be a graduate from a public school regulated by a school system and state department of education or be a graduate from a high school accredited by one of the following: A regional accrediting association such as the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools The Georgia Accrediting Commission The Georgia Private School Accrediting Council

A student graduating from a non-accredited high school or a non-accredited homeschool program can be considered for admission as a freshman under the provision for alternative requirements for home-schooled students and graduates of non-accredited high schools. See Section 3.2.6, Alternative Requirements for Homeschooled Students and Graduates of Non-accredited High Schools.

General Education Diploma (GED)
Students who earn the GED may be considered for admission at a two-year or state college. A student who presents the GED is expected to be at least 18 years of age and for his/her high school class to have graduated. However, should the student in possession of the GED be younger than 18 or from a class not graduated, the institution is permitted to make an exception on a case-by-case basis. See Appendix A, Admitting GED Students, for more information.


3.2.2 High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA)

Last reviewed: January 2010

The High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA) is calculated on an alpha four point scale. Numerical grades indicated on transcripts should be converted to letter grades based on the conversion table provided by the high school. Institutions must obtain these tables. The letter grades should be converted to quality points as follows:

  • A = 4
  • B = 3
  • C = 2
  • D = 1
  • F = 0

The HSGPA is calculated only on the Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) units required for all students. If a student takes more than the required number of courses in any one area, the best grades may be used in the calculation of the HSGPA (instead of the first courses taken that satisfy the requirement). If a student takes two years each of two foreign languages, the language in which the student had the best grades would be counted.

Students graduating from high school before 2012 must have the following HSGPA:

  • Students graduating with a College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) Diploma must have a 2.00 HSGPA calculated on the grades in the 16 required units of the CPC.
  • Students graduating with a Technical/Career Program (TCP) Diploma must have a 2.20 HSGPA calculated on the grades in the 12 academic units of the TCP.

Students graduating from high school 2012 or later must have 2.00 HSGPA calculated on the grades in the required 17 units of the RHSC.

Institutions are required to use a standard procedure to calculate the HSGPA for reporting to the BoR, which includes not adding weights to particular courses. However, institutions may use other methods of HSGPA calculation for determining admission eligibility.


3.2.3 Required High School Curriculum (RHSC)

Last reviewed: January 2010

(Formerly called College Preparatory Curriculum)

Students are expected to meet the USG’s RHSC requirements. In addition to these course requirements, students are encouraged to take additional academic units in high school to improve their probability for admission and success.

Students graduating from high school in 2012 must present 17 specified RHSC units of credit. Students graduating from high school prior to 2012 must present 16 CPC units.

  • 4 units of mathematics
  • 4 units of English
  • 3 units of science (Students who graduate in 2012 or later must have 4 units.)
  • 3 units of social science, including one course focusing on world studies.
  • 2 units in the same foreign language (2 units of American Sign Language may be used to satisfy this requirement.)

The Office of Student Affairs maintains a complete list of courses that can be used to satisfy the RHSC requirements. See Staying on Course


3.2.4 Test Scores

Last revised: October 2014

Students seeking regular admission to a college or university as a first time student or transfer student with fewer than 30 transferable hours must have a minimum SAT Verbal/Critical Reading score of 430 and Mathematics score of 400 or must have an ACT English score of 17 and ACT Mathematics score of 17. However, with approval, institutions may set higher SAT/ACT requirements. Students who do not meet the SAT/ACT scores required for exemption from Learning Support will be evaluated for Learning Support placement and may be required to take placement tests.

In Fall 2010, the BoR approved a change in policy which allows state colleges to choose between requiring the SAT/ACT/FI or using the High School grade point average (HSGPA) for admission. Individuals applying to institutions that do not require SAT/ACT/FI are encouraged to submit SAT or ACT scores but are not required to do so. Those who apply to these institutions and who submit SAT/ACT scores at least as high as the system minimums (SAT Verbal/Critical Reading score of 430 and Mathematics score of 400 or ACT English score of 17 and ACT Mathematics score of 17) may exempt the Learning Support evaluation process outlined below. (Some institutions require higher SAT or ACT scores than the system minimums). Students who submit lower SAT/ACT scores or who do not report SAT/ACT scores must be evaluated for Learning Support placement as outlined below

If the student has taken the SAT or ACT more than once, the highest scores may be used for determining eligibility for admission. Students must use verbal/critical reading and math scores from the SAT, OR English and math scores from the ACT; students may not use a combination of SAT and ACT scores to meet minimum requirements. SAT or ACT test scores submitted toward satisfying Learning Support requirements must have been earned prior to enrollment.

Applicants who have been out of high school for at least five years who apply to institutions which require SAT or ACT scores are not required to submit SAT/ACT scores. However, in order to avoid additional testing, such applicants may submit SAT/ACT scores that are no older than seven years and which are at least 500 in both Verbal/Critical Reading and Mathematics or ACT scores of at least 21 on both English and Mathematics. Applicants who do not report SAT/ACT scores at least that high must be evaluated for Learning Support placement as outlined below.

Students seeking admission to a USG institution who submit SAT test scores of 430/400 or higher or ACT test scores of 17 or higher are exempt from Learning Support evaluation unless that institution sets higher minimum scores for regular freshman admission.

Evaluation for Learning Support Placement
Students taking courses or seeking to enter applied associate degree or certificate programs with Learning Support prerequisites or seeking to enter programs leading to the associate or baccalaureate degree must be evaluated for Learning Support placement in English (reading/writing) and mathematics unless they exempt by the appropriate scores on SAT/ACT or the Georgia High School Graduation Test in English/Language Arts (HSGT-ELA). The COMPASS exam will be used as the placement test. (Alternative tests to the COMPASS placement tests may be allowed with authorization of the Chief Academic Officer or designee. Scores from authorized alternative tests must be converted to equivalent COMPASS scores for purposes of calculating the placement indices described below. Refer to the CPE-COMPASS-ASSET Linkage Table. In all cases, students should be encouraged to submit test scores that can be used to exempt placement testing.

A Mathematics Placement Index (MPI) and an English Placement Index (EPI) will be calculated based on High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA), SAT or ACT and, when indicated, the COMPASS placement test or other approved placement test.

Indices will be composed of:

  1. HSGPA and SAT/ACT - when both are available
  2. HSGPA and COMPASS - when SAT/ACT are not available
  3. COMPASS - when neither HSGPA nor SAT/ACT is available

For some students who score below the cutoff EPI or MPI, COMPASS test scores add some additional information over that contained in HSGPA and SAT/ACT; those students will be required to take the appropriate COMPASS tests. The COMPASS score will be combined with the HSGPA and SAT/ACT and the resultant EPI or MPI will be compared to the System level cut scores to determine students’ Learning Support Placement.

When COMPASS testing is required, the COMPASS Math (Algebra) test will be used for math placement. The Compass Reading and COMPASS e-Write 2-12 tests will be used for English placement.

EPIs and MPIs will be calculated as listed below, in priority order for calculation. That is, if available, SAT or ACT and High School Grade Point Averages (HSGPA) must be used in the calculations.

For the purposes of calculating placement indices, it is recommended that scores be no older than the maximums listed below.

Measure or Score Recommended Maximum “Age”
SAT/ACT 7 years from date of administration
HSGPA 5 years from date of graduation
COMPASS 1 year from date of administration

Institutions have the option to accept older scores and HSGPA.

Student has:EPIMPI
SAT and HSGPA (1603*HSGPA)+ SATV (291*HSGPA)+ SATM
with COMPASS added (1475*HSGPA )+ (0.3*SATV) + (5.1*(CompassR+e-Write))(287*HSGPA)+ (0.5*SATM) + (5*CompassM)
ACT and HSGPA (1553*HSGPA) + (34*ACTE) (298*HSGPA) + (25*ACTM)
with COMPASS added (1315*HSGPA) + (30*ACTE)+ (4.2*(CompassR +e-Write)) (250*HSGPA) + (27*ACTM)+ (2*CompassM)
GPA only (794*HSGPA )+ (23.6*(CompassR+e-Write)) (323*HSGPA)+ (6*CompassM)
No info 51.6*(CompassR+e-Write (10*CompassM) + 795
SAT only (6.3*SATV) + (17.1*(CompassR+e-Write))(1.8*SATM) + (14*CompassM)
ACT only (155.3*ACTE) + (13.8*(CompassR+ e-Write))( 63.2 * ACTM) + (6.0 * CompassM)

Students with EPIs and MPIs equal to or greater than the minimum collegiate placement index scores listed below will be placed directly into the appropriate gateway college course(s). Note that because a higher level of preparation is required for success in Math 1111, a higher MPI will be required for direct placement into that course.

Minimum Collegiate Placement Index Scores
EnglishMathematics
ENGL 1101 MATH 1011 or 1101MATH 111
4230 11651265

Students with placement indices less than the minimum collegiate placement index will be placed into corequisite or Foundations-level Learning Support.

Students who score below the floor scores in both English and mathematics will be denied admission to all USG institutions. The floor scores for the two indices are as follows:

Floor Scores
EPIMPI
3032 928

If the EPI is less than 3032 AND the MPI is less than 928, then student may NOT be admitted to a USG institution.

Students who score below the floor index score in only one area may be admitted to USG institutions if their scores in the other area are equal to or greater than the offsetting index score listed below.

Minimum Offsetting Placement Index
EPIMPI
3905 1028

  • If the EPI is less than 3032, then the MPI must be greater than or equal to 1028.
  • If the MPI is less than 928, than the EPI must be greater than or equal to 3905.

3.2.5 Freshman Index (FI)

The BoR has set minimum scores for each sector. With permission, institutions can require higher FI requirements; or they can use a combination of test scores, HSGPA, and FI as their admission standards. Following are the FI requirements for regular freshman admissions and limited freshman admissions by sector.

Freshman Index (FI) Combination of High School GPA and SAT or ACT Scores
Sector Requirements for Regular Freshman Admissions Requirements for Limited Freshman Admissions
Research Universities FI must be greater than or equal to 2500
SAT must be at least 430 on Verbal/Critical Reading and 400 on Math ACT must be 17 on English and Math
FI must be greater than or equal to 2020
SAT must be at least 430 on Verbal/Critical Reading and 400 on Math
ACT must be 17 on English and Math
Regional Universities FI must be greater than or equal to 2040
SAT must be at least 430 on Verbal/Critical Reading and 400 on Math
ACT must be 17 on English and Math
FI must be greater than or equal to 1830
SAT must be at least 430 on Verbal/Critical Reading and 400 on Math
ACT must be 17 on English and Math
State Universities FI must be greater than or equal to 1940
SAT must be at least 430 on Verbal/Critical Reading and 400 on Math
ACT must be 17 on English and Math
FI must be greater than or equal to 1790
SAT must be at least 430 on Verbal/Critical Reading and 400 on Math
ACT must be 17 on English and Math
State Colleges (baccalaureate programs only) FI must be greater than or equal to 1830
SAT I must be at least 330 on Verbal/Critical Reading and 310 on Math
ACT must be 12 on English and 14 on Math
SAT I must be at least 330 on Verbal/Critical Reading and 310 on Math
ACT must be 12 on English and 14 on Math
All LS requirements apply, and any RHSC deficiencies must be made up.

FI for Two-year Institutions
As part of the Pilot Admissions Project, the FI was waived for students seeking admission to two-year institutions. The FI is required for State Colleges that reinstate test scores as an admissions requirement for baccalaureate programs.

Calculation of Freshman Index
The FI report is calculated only on the high school curriculum units required for all students. If a student takes more than the required number of courses in any one area, the best grades may be used in the calculation of the HSGPA (instead of the first courses taken that satisfy the requirement). If a student takes two years each of two foreign languages, the language in which the student had the best grades would be counted.

The HSGPA for the FI report is the sum of all quality points divided by the number of courses, rounded to two decimal places, and with a maximum value not to exceed 4.0.

If the student has taken the SAT or ACT more than once, the highest verbal/critical reading and highest mathematics scores may be used to calculate the FI. Students must use verbal/critical reading and math scores from the SAT, OR verbal/critical reading and math scores from the ACT; students may not use a combination of SAT and ACT scores to meet minimum requirements.

The comparable score tables from a joint study by ACT, ETS, and the College Board should be used for institutional admissions criteria above the USG minimum scores. See Appendix C, ACT/SAT Concordance Tables.


3.2.6 Special Admissions

Last Revised: October 2014

Students may also be admitted as freshmen based on other evidence of college readiness. Following are modified or additional requirements for specific groups of applicants.

Limited Admissions

In recognition of the fact that a limited group of students does not meet established standards but does demonstrate special potential for success, the BoR has created other categories of admission that institutions can use. Institutions are expected to adhere to requirements prescribed and the admissions percentages allotted for their sectors.

Limited Admissions Restrictions
Institutions are restricted by sector to a maximum number of students who may be admitted in this category. The number of traditional freshmen students who can be granted Limited Admissions for the entire academic year will be no more than the following percentages of the institution’s annual first-time freshman headcount enrollment.

Research Universities Up to 7 percent
Comprehensive Universities Up to 15 percent
State Universities Up to 20 percent
State Colleges* Up to 33 percent

*State Colleges that elect to require test scores for admission are required to adhere to the limited admit percentage.

Non-traditional freshmen and transfer students are not to be included in the Limited Admissions percentage allowed for each institution, nor will these groups be included in determining the base.

Presidential Exceptions
Under the limited admissions provision, presidents of USG institutions may grant exceptions to the BoR minimum freshman admission requirements if the student shows promise for academic success in college. Institutions can use multiple measures, such as interviews, portfolios, and records of experiential achievements for considering students in this category.

Students who are admitted under the Presidential Exception option should be included in the maximum number of Limited Admissions allowed for an institution.

Even under very special and rare circumstances when institutions have extensive evidence that a student has potential for success despite not meeting USG requirements, institutions must demonstrate that the student meets at least one of the following:

Addressing RHSC Deficiencies

Students with RHSC deficiencies shall be required to satisfy those deficiencies using one of the following methods:

Address Deficiency Prior to Enrollment
Students who have Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) deficiencies but can demonstrate competency in the deficient area(s) will be deemed as meeting the RHSC requirements. Provided these students meet all other requirements for regular admission for the sector of institution to which he/she is applying, the institution will not be required to admit them under the Limited Admissions category.

An out-of-state applicant, who has successfully completed the college preparatory curriculum requirements of his or her home state but has been determined to have a deficiency according to the USG’s RHSC policy. As part of the exemption, the applicant must provide documentation that provides overwhelming evidence of competency in the deficient area (see Demonstrate Subject Matter Proficiency section) or provide documentation that demonstrates that the coursework he/she completed is equivalent in content and rigor to the required course.

Demonstrate Subject Matter Proficiency
A student can satisfy an RHSC deficiency by demonstrating competency in the area(s) considered deficient or by addressing the deficiency through an appropriate course successfully completed prior to enrollment at a USG institution. Institutions may set additional and/or higher requirements for demonstrating subject matter proficiency than those listed below.

Option 1: Demonstrate Subject Matter Proficiency Through Approved Standardized Tests

A student may demonstrate competency through standardized examinations such as the SAT, ACT, CLEP, DSST, COMPASS or other comparable examinations approved by the BOR. Written requests to use other examinations should be submitted to Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

  1. A student whose SAT or ACT score in the deficient area is at or above the average SAT or ACT score of the previous year’s fall semester first-time freshmen admitted to the USG institution indicates competency in the area.

  2. A student may use the following SAT II Subject Tests to demonstrate competency in a deficient area: English, Writing, Literature, Foreign Languages, Math IC or Math IIC, American History & Social Studies, World History, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Students may use SAT II Subject Tests to demonstrate exposure and competencies for areas not reflected in their course work. For example, students that are deemed deficient by one science course but took physics, biology and chemistry in high school cannot address the science deficiency by taking an SAT II subject test in physics, biology or chemistry. Institutions using SAT II tests to validate a student’s high school curriculum requirements are expected to establish required scores needed to demonstrate subject matter proficiency.

  3. A student may use the CLEP and DSST subject examination to demonstrate competency in a deficient area. Institutions using CLEP or DSST to validate a student’s high school curriculum requirements are expected to establish required scores needed to demonstrate subject matter proficiency. When possible institutions should refer to the credit recommendations of the American Council on Education Guide.

  4. COMPASS (for English and Mathematics) – Students with fewer than four required units of English or mathematics and (after Fall 2015) without SAT/ACT scores are required to take the comparable COMPASS sections or comparable placement examination approved by the BOR for determining Learning Support placement. Based on their scores or placement indices (see 2.9.1 in the Academic and Student Affairs Handbook), students will exempt Learning Support, which will satisfy the deficiency, or be placed in the appropriate Learning Support course in English and/or mathematics. Successfully exiting Learning Support will satisfy the deficiency.

  5. Comparable examinations approved by the BOR. Written requests to use other examinations should be submitted to Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

Option 2: Demonstrate Subject Matter Proficiency Through Approved Coursework.

A student may address the deficiency prior to enrollment by taking a USG-approved high school course in the deficiency area(s) or a three credit collegiate course in the appropriate subject area(s). A student who has taken a terminal course in a subject area (for example, a student who has completed calculus in the 11th grade) will be deemed as meeting the RHSC requirement in that subject area.

Address Deficiency After Enrollment
Students who have RHSC deficiencies, which are addressed after enrollment, can be admitted under the Limited Admissions category.

Students who have RHSC deficiencies and who successfully complete collegiate courses addressing all of their deficiencies within their first 30 credit hours will be considered as having satisfied the deficiency or deficiencies. These students will receive collegiate credit that can count towards the student’s degree program. If a student does not address the deficiencies within the first 30 credit hours, then the student may not register for other courses, unless they also register for the appropriate deficiency course or courses. Successful completion of a three credit collegiate course in the appropriate subject area demonstrates collegiate-level preparedness and is sufficient for satisfying an RHSC deficiency in that subject area.

Summary of Regular and Limited Freshman Admissions Standards

Summary of Minimum System Admissions Requirements by Sector for Freshman Applicants
Sector Regular Admission Limited Admission
Research Universities 16 CPC or 17 RHSC units
FI of 2500
Minimum testing scores:
430 SAT Verbal/Critical Reading 400 SAT I Math or 17 ACT English and Math
16 CPC or 17 RHSC units
FI of 2020
Minimum testing scores:
430 SAT Verbal/Critical Reading 400 SAT I Math or 17 ACT English and Math
Regional Universities 16 CPC or 17 RHSC units
FI of 2040 or more
Minimum testing scores:
430 SAT Verbal/Critical Reading 400 on the SAT I Math or 17 on ACT English and Math
16 CPC or 17 RHSC units
FI of 1830 or more
Minimum testing scores:
430 SAT Verbal/Critical Reading 400 SAT I Math test or 17 on ACT English and Math
State Universities 16 CPC or 17 RHSC units
FI of 1940 or more
Minimum testing scores:
430 SAT Verbal/Critical Reading 400 SAT I Math or 17 on ACT English and Math
16 CPC or 17 RHSC units
FI of 1790 or more
Minimum testing scores:
430 SAT Verbal/Critical Reading 400 on the SAT I Math or 17 on ACT English and Math
State Colleges (Requiring SAT or ACT) 16 CPC or 17 RHSC units
FI of 1830 or more
Minimum testing scores:
330 SAT Verbal/Critical Reading 310 SAT I Math or 12 on ACT English and 14 on Math
High School diploma or
Minimum testing scores:
330 SAT Verbal/Critical Reading
310 SAT I Math or 12 on ACT English and 14 on Math
State Colleges (Not requiring SAT or ACT) 16 CPC or 17 RHSC units High school diploma or GED

Alternative Requirements for Students Graduating from Non-Accredited High Schools or Non-Accredited Home School Programs
Applicants who have graduated from a non-accredited high school or a non-accredited homeschool program may be considered for admission at any USG institution. BoR Policy 4.2.1.1, Freshman Requirements, establishes guidelines for institutions to determine a homeschooled/non accredited high school student’s probability of success in college.

Institutions wishing to use SAT II tests to validate a student’s college preparatory requirements are expected to establish required scores for students seeking admission to the institution.

Each institution may establish additional admission requirements above those set by the BoR. Institutions are encouraged to list requirements for homeschooled and graduates of non-accredited high schools in the catalog and on the institution’s website.

Homeschooled students or graduates of non-accredited high schools must submit SAT or ACT equivalent scores and satisfactory documentation of equivalent competence in each of the RHSC areas at the college preparatory level in lieu of the Freshman Index and Carnegie unit requirements of the RHSC.

For the period of time the Pilot Admission Project is in effect, homeschooled students or students from non-accredited high schools seeking admission to a two-year institution will be expected to present test scores at or above the average test scores for the institution’s Fall 2005 freshman class. Homeschooled students seeking admission to a state college that has reinstated the test score requirement must meet the test score requirement for the institution.

Admission of Students with Outstanding Scores
BoR Policy 4.2.1.1 permits institutions to consider those few students who, through test scores and personal achievement, have demonstrated their potential for success in college. However, institutions are advised to assess the student’s readiness to do college work. Factors that should be considered include academic experience, historical attendance patterns, and level of maturity. Students under the age of 18 are at greater risk for failure, and institutions are advised to admit only those students who show the greatest potential for success. Institutions seeking to enroll students under the age of 16 should consult federal guidelines for compliance rules before offering letters of acceptance. For requirements for students who have not yet graduated from high school but who wish to enroll in USG core courses, see Opportunities for High School Students in this same section.

Admission of Students with Non-U.S. Academic Credentials/ Admission of Students Whose First Language Is Not English

Freshman International Students

Freshman international students may be considered for admission in any category or in this special category. International students may also be admitted as Presidential Exceptions.

Students whose secondary education was completed outside the United States system of education may be admitted with acceptable foreign credentials and English language proficiency as described below:

  • Foreign Credentials
    Academic performance described by a certificate, diploma, or other document deemed generally equivalent to a U.S. required high school curriculum by a reputable credential evaluator (internal or external to the institution) is acceptable.

  • English Language Proficiency Requirements
    The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), or some other USG-approved evaluation of English proficiency is required.

    The minimum and recommended scores acceptable for admission follow:

      Minimum Score for Admission Recommended Score for Admission
    Paper TOEFL 523 550
    Computer TOEFL 193 213
    Internet TOEFL 69 79
    IELTS 6 6.5
    SAT Critical Reading 430  
    ACT English 17  

    Institutions and departmental programs within the institution may set higher minimum test scores for admission.

    Institutions may develop procedures to determine whether there is a need for placement in Learning Support English and/or ESL courses for students who meet the minimum English Proficiency requirements.

    Math admissions criteria, including the SAT or ACT, and placement criteria are required for international students.

    An academically admissible applicant with credentials from another country who needs supplemental English language instruction (as indicated by an approved method for determining English Proficiency described above) may be admitted to a degree program on the condition that the student will receive the supplemental English language instruction in a System-approved program. This conditional admission is possible only at those institutions approved to provide English language instruction for non-native speakers of English. Programs of English-as-a Second Language used under this provision must be approved by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer.

    English Proficiency and Transfer Students
    Students who are non-native speakers of English, who transfer from an institution of higher education outside the U.S. where English was not the language of instruction, are required to submit a TOEFL or IELTS score or some other recognized evaluation of English along with their foreign credentials.

    The minimum and recommended scores acceptable for admission follows:

      Minimum Score for Admission Recommended Score for Admission
    Paper TOEFL 523 550
    Computer TOEFL 193 213
    Internet TOEFL 69 79
    IELTS 6 6.5

    Institutions and departmental programs within the institution may set higher minimum test scores for admission.

    Students who are non-native speakers of English and who are transferring from an accredited institution of higher education inside the U.S. may be required to retake the TOEFL if their English proficiency cannot be demonstrated to the satisfaction of the admitting institution.

U.S. Immigration Regulations
Federal regulations place significant responsibilities on students and universities in the administration of the U.S. laws pertaining to F-1 or J-1 non-immigrant students. Institutions are required to follow certain record-keeping and reporting requirements of the U.S. government.

Institutions enrolling international students are required to determine the academic admissibility and the financial resources of applicants prior to the issuance of the immigration document I-20 A-B or IAP-66.

Only a Designated School Official appointed by the institution’s president and registered with the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) may sign forms I-20 A-B, I-538, and other F-1 student immigration-related documents. Only a Responsible Officer or Alternate Responsible Officer approved by the U.S. Department of State may sign forms IAP-66. For more information, see http://www.immigrationdirect.com/?gclid=CK3qo_zM85oCFQJ-xgodwmDydA and http://www.ice.gov/sevis/.

Admission of Students with Disabilities
Students who meet regular admission requirements should be admitted without regard to disabilities. Students with documented disabilities seeking admission to a USG institution are required to meet the RHSC requirements and achieve the institution’s SAT or ACT score requirements with testing accommodations. Students who are unable to meet the foreign language requirement due to a documented disability may petition for a course substitution following the procedures described in Section 3.11.3. See Section 3.11 for additional information regarding students with disabilities.

Opportunities for High School Students
The USG is committed to providing opportunities to high school students allowing for the enhancement of their high school curriculum through the availability of college offerings prior to high school graduation.

The USG has approved the following three opportunities for academically talented high school students to earn college credit before graduating from high school:

Dual enrollment A student, while continuing his/her enrollment in high school, enrolls in a course for both high school and college credit.
Joint enrollment A student, while continuing his/her enrollment in high school as a junior or senior, enrolls in courses for college credit.
Early admissions The student enrolls as a full-time college student following completion of the junior year in high school.

To participate in one of these options a student must be enrolled in a public or private secondary high school that is regulated by a school system and state department of education or accredited by one of the following:

  • A regional accrediting association (such as the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools)
  • The Georgia Accrediting Commission
  • The Georgia Private School Accrediting Council (GAPSAC)

Homeschooled Students
Homeschooled students may be considered for joint enrollment if they are enrolled in Non-traditional Educational Centers that are recognized by GAPSAC or by state departments of education. Students attending non-accredited home school programs or non-accredited high schools may also be eligible to participate in joint enrollment opportunities if they meet all general admission requirements for dual enrollment and have validated their on-track Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) units according to the policy of the institution to which they are applying. Institutions are encouraged to include information about joint enrollment requirements for students from non-accredited home school programs or non-accredited high schools in their catalog and on their web sites.

General Admission Requirements
The BoR has established the following admission standards for accelerated learning; however, each institution has the authority to establish higher and additional admission requirements.

  • Minimum SAT score of 970 (combined Verbal/Critical Reading and Mathematics sections) or ACT composite of 20. Institutions seeking to use alternative placement test(s) must seek prior approval from the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.
  • Minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 3.0 as calculated by the institution for admission purposes
  • Exemption of all Learning Support requirements
  • Written consent of parent or guardian if the student is a minor
  • Evidence in the transcript that student is on track towards the completion of the USG RHSC requirements and high school graduation.

Institutions may have more restrictive requirements for high school juniors; however, establishing such higher requirements may not preclude high school juniors from participating in these programs.


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